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Biased
Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do | Jennifer L. Eberhardt, PhD
2 posts | 3 read | 10 to read
"Groundbreaking."--Bryan Stevenson, New York Times bestselling author of Just Mercy From one of the world's leading experts on unconscious racial bias, a personal examination of one of the central controversies and culturally powerful issues of our time, and its influence on contemporary race relations and criminal justice. You don't have to be racist to be biased. Unconscious bias can be at work without our realizing it, and even when we genuinely wish to treat all people equally, ingrained stereotypes can infect our visual perception, attention, memory, and behavior. This has an impact on education, employment, housing, and criminal justice. In Biased, with a perspective that is at once scientific, investigative, and informed by personal experience, Jennifer Eberhardt offers us insights into the dilemma and a path forward. Eberhardt works extensively as a consultant to law enforcement and as a psychologist at the forefront of this new field. Her research takes place in courtrooms and boardrooms, in prisons, on the street, and in classrooms and coffee shops. She shows us the subtle--and sometimes dramatic--daily repercussions of implicit bias in how teachers grade students, or managers deal with customers. It has an enormous impact on the conduct of criminal justice, from the rapid decisions police officers have to make to sentencing practices in court. Eberhardt's work and her book are both influenced by her own life, and the personal stories she shares emphasize the need for change. She has helped companies that include Airbnb and Nextdoor address bias in their business practices and has led anti-bias initiatives for police departments across the country. Here, she offers practical suggestions for reform and new practices that are useful for organizations as well as individuals. Unblinking about the tragic consequences of prejudice, Eberhardt addresses how racial bias is not the fault of nor restricted to a few "bad apples" but is present at all levels of society in media, education, and business. The good news is that we are not hopelessly doomed by our innate prejudices. In Biased, Eberhardt reminds us that racial bias is a human problem--one all people can play a role in solving.
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review
Itchyfeetreader
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This is undoubtedly an important book - the author brings decades of clinical and social research into conscious and unconcious racial bias with a specific focus on criminal justice and education. She writes well and carefully explains a huge number of studies into the topic as well as explaining their significance. She does so without judgement whilst explaining some of the clinical as well as social with I found fascinating. ⬇️⬇️

Itchyfeetreader My only criticism is that at times it felt a little disjointed, however I learned a great deal and the chapters especially on education will stay with me especially when paired with some of my take always about data gaps from invisible women which I finished earlier in the week. 1mo
laurenslibrary I've been into all of these kind of books lately! Thanks for turning me on to a new one! 1mo
Itchyfeetreader @LaurensLibrary more than welcome - it‘s definitely worth reading. The author is hugely experienced and paints a really clear picture. We have been talking a lot about unconscious bias at work so her thoughts on training programmes on this topic were also incredibly timely for me 1mo
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review
Christine
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This was outstanding - highly recommend. Eberhardt expertly demonstrates (via study after scientific study, and plenty of heartfelt anecdotal evidence from her own experiences and those of others) that we ALL are racially biased, and how American culture is teeming with racial bias. And that we need to work much harder on recognizing, admitting to, and confronting it. Loved the audio - the author reads with passion.

SW-T Sounds like a good read. We form thoughts quickly and unconsciously, regardless of our intentions. Reminds me of Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman or Malcolm Gladwell‘s 2mo
Christine @SW-T Yes, and good call re: the similar titles! I still need to read the Kahneman book. 2mo
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