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tenar

tenar

Joined March 2019

all my reviews are belated, and I‘m just happy to be here. (they/them) storygraph says: reflective, informative •nonfiction •nature •scifi •classics
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tenar
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Pickpick

A #Victober surprise! I picked this up after reading a few of its lines on the Welsh countryside- ah, the gorse and heather. Its nature imagery is luscious, and the land is truly the heart and soul of the novel.

The simple religious and romantic plots are enriched by the care taken in developing the full family dynamics of the Owens of Garthowen. A gentle story that weighs up thoughtful questions about duty, longing, and our faith in one another.

tenar P.S. I would like to thank this book for healing the festering sore in my heart that was left earlier this year by Willa Cather‘s O Pioneers!. 3d
Suet624 💕💕💕 3d
16 likes2 comments
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New Year Who Dis? | Bitchy Fits
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Our #NewYearWhoDis matches are out, thanks to host @monalyisha, and I‘m delighted by my list from @jenniferw88. Like, one of my favorite niche topics is nonfiction about the author‘s relationship with birds, and you hit it. What are the odds? I can‘t wait for the new year!

These 6 reads are just scratching the surface for options to pick up in January; it‘s such a deep list, I‘d like to keep reading from it as the year goes on. I feel spoiled 😌

monalyisha OoOOo. Have you read anything by J. Drew Lanham? I just added a couple of his books to my TBR recently. They look so good! 6d
tenar @monalyisha What a timely question! I haven‘t yet, but I have his book The Home Place on this month‘s TBR for #NonfictionNovember (which will likely run over into December, hah). I hope we both love his work! 6d
monalyisha Me too! I'll be watching out for your review (in addition to all of the #NYWD22 reviews come January)! 6d
jenniferw88 A good selection here! Glad you think my list will keep you going throughout the year - I have a feeling yours will too for me! 6d
28 likes5 comments
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Thank you for the tag @ravenlee #Two4Tuesday

1. At the end of October I hit my year total goal of 50 books, which is how many books I read last year. It‘s all gravy from here!

2. For the end of the year, I have a list of fiction books by women authors I‘ve either never read from before or just got into- Edith Wharton, Vicki Baum, Nella Larsen, Virginia Woolf. And definitely Susanna Clarke‘s Piranesi.

Anyone who wants to play, I choose you!

TheSpineView Congrats on reaching your goal and thanks for playing! 1w
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Time for a readathon! I‘m going to join #NovelNovember with a simple goal: read at least one hour a day. I‘ve been neglecting reading for other hobbies.

I‘m delighted the Bookly app has added a readathon feature! Screenshot above, extra autumnal flavor not included. You enter the details yourself, and it will track pages, books, and/or hours read, and will keep a list of prompts. Love that app.

Thanks for hosting @Andrew65 🍁 Let‘s read!

Andrew65 I need to explore Bookly again, I used to use it a few years ago. Love the Readathon feature. Glad to have you with us, good luck 😊👍 2w
tenar @Andrew65 I find having stats really motivates me to read, so I love it! Good luck to you on your overlapping readathons! 👏🏻 2w
Andrew65 @tenar Thanks 😊 I agree, the stats do the same for me. (edited) 2w
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Here are 6 books I‘d love to read for #NonfictionNovember but maybe won‘t, due to an imminent Animal Crossing update 😅

Vanguard is our #SheSaid bookclub read, spotlighting black women who fought for the vote! Underland is “an exploration of Earth‘s underworlds”. Hideous Progeny examines disfigurement in classic horror film. The Home Place is a birding memoir on black identity. Rising is climate journalism & Science Friday‘s book club read. 👇🏻

tenar And Ill Feelings by Alice Hattrick is my most anticipated. It‘s a multi-genre book exploring 'unexplained‘ illness, particularly ME/CFS. The blurb hooked me, “[This] collective biography of illness branches out into the records of ill health women have written about in diaries and letters. The cast of characters includes Virginia Woolf and Alice James, the poets Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Emily Dickinson…”! 4w
fredthemoose Great list!! 4w
Lesliereads I enjoyed The Home Place. 💕 It was a little uneven but I was into it. 2w
tenar @Lesliereads I‘m delighted to hear that! I hadn‘t bumped into many people who have read it. I anticipate being into it, too. 2w
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The Moonstone | Wilkie COLLINS
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Pickpick

My second Wilkie Collins, and though it didn‘t live up to The Woman in White, there‘s a lot here to enjoy for the detective fan! As one of the earliest in the genre, it helped codify many tropes, like the reenactment of the crime. A good mystery.

Once again Mr. Collins‘ characters express sexism, racism, & ableism throughout, yet once again he has written “exceptional” characters into the novel that defy these stereotypes. An interesting author.

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Dropping my usual TBR for Booktube‘s #Victober! It‘s my fav month, and my Victorian October read last year, The Woman in White, was a highlight of 2020.

We‘ll see how many I get to; most count for multiple prompts. For ‘Popular‘, I wanted to read a book more popular then than now and thought Anne Brontë‘s book fit the bill. I learned Charlotte stopped its later reprinting! For the bonus “read aloud” challenge, I‘ll read Carmilla to my mom ?

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Mrs. Dalloway | Virginia Woolf
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Pickpick

I finally picked Mrs. Dalloway up after falling in love with Woolf‘s essay On Being Ill. This novel‘s stream of consciousness is like what living is like, for me at least, where the clock chime pulls me from a memory, and a character is stumbling into the biggest questions while just waiting to cross the street. Somehow so relatable while incredibly specifically set in London, in 1923, in the shadow of the Great War. I liked this a lot! #Bookspin

TiminCalifornia Great review. 2mo
tenar @TiminCalifornia Thank you. I think really lovely books somehow rub off on their reviews! 2mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 2mo
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Foundation | Isaac Asimov
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Mehso-so

I may like the idea of this book more than the reality of it. My teenage self set my Goodreads URL to /psychohistory, as I was fascinated by that fictional branch of mathematics which sets these stories in motion. On this reread, Asimov‘s predicted decline of the galactic empire by stagnation of investment in science felt more possible than ever, yet for every spark of my interest there was an equally deep waning as we skipped across time.

tenar This is unfortunate, as I consider myself a minor Asimov fan, and the Foundation series is my brother‘s absolute favorite! As my difficulty seems to be with execution rather than the ideas, I find myself looking forward to the upcoming TV adaptation! 2mo
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Frankenstein | Mary Shelley
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I read Frankenstein with an online class last week and was surprised by both the breadth of its themes and the depths of its tragedy. As an old epistolary monster tale, I expected suspense like Dracula, and this instead was like being beaten against a rocky shore by wave upon wave of misery! I enjoyed the interludes of alpine nature writing and comparing my 1818 edition w/ Shelley‘s edited 1831, in which she seemed to tone down her radical ideas.

beeweird "Wave upon wave of misery" is a great summary ? 3mo
tenar @beeweird I felt like I barely made it out alive! 😅 3mo
marleed I read this for the first time last October. I was surprised how much more I liked this book than any screen adaptation. 3mo
tenar @marleed It‘s so different. More sensitive, romantic, tragic. And I think that difference isn‘t just in the character of the monster, but in Victor! The book version of Mr. Frankenstein may be one of the most emotional characters I‘ve ever read. 3mo
marleed Completely agree! 3mo
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I don‘t feel ready for September, but here it comes anyway! I do have a list, and I did read my #BookSpin (Wordslut) and #DoubleSpin (O Pioneers!) in August, but I didn‘t get a chance to gather my thoughts to post reviews.

Here are my 10 nonfiction & 10 fiction picks. Thinking about quickly swapping in a U.K. Le Guin. 😂 I‘ll definitely read Foundation by Asimov, in anticipation of the TV show, and Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde with #SheSaid!

TheAromaofBooks Yay!!! And I checked off that you finished your August reads, even if you don't get a chance to review them!! 3mo
tenar @TheAromaofBooks Thanks so much, and thank you again for hosting! I so enjoy playing along ☺️ 3mo
TheAromaofBooks I really love seeing everyone's lists and enthusiasm, even though it means I totally have added more books to my TBR than I've taken off! 😂 3mo
tenar @TheAromaofBooks Hahahah, same on both counts! 3mo
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I‘ve been enjoying watching the Paralympics and wheelchair basketball this week, so much so I started craving a book pairing. Found it!

The subtitle, “How Paralyzed Veterans from World War II Invented Wheelchair Sports, Fought for Disability Rights, and Inspired a Nation”, is so darn long in an effort to cover the many movements that trace roots back to these US & British veterans, including, it seems, the Paralympics! Can‘t wait to learn more.

Amiable That looks really good! Looking forward to your review. 3mo
tenar @Amiable Thanks, I hope I can heartily recommend it! ☺️ 3mo
Amiable @tenar I looked it up on Goodreads —it has a a really good rating. 3mo
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Pickpick

Accessible and very brief at under 200 pages minus footnotes! Each chapter could be fleshed out into its own book, for better and for worse. Takes care to illuminate history using individual people‘s stories, using quotes when possible, beginning at the earliest written record of the land. Intersectional, focused on communities and movements, with a mildly sardonic tone that took for granted that the reader respects disabled people. I liked that.

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My August #BookSpin list, 10 fiction & 10 non-fiction. I‘m still deep in the airplane-mode-library-hole where all the ebooks I think I have are actually illusory.

I read 5 books off July‘s list and am meandering through 2 more, Miyazakiworld and Arsène Lupin. In August I‘m definitely reading the longest listed book, Children of Time 600p, with my scifi-loving mom, and Wordslut with the Litsy bookclub #SheSaid. Hoping to get to several more! ??

MallenNC I am often in airplane mode on my Ereader! Great list this month. 4mo
tenar @MallenNC I‘m glad to know I‘m not alone, hah! Thanks, and you, too. Interested in what you think of a lot of your list, especially 4mo
MallenNC @tenar It seems like all my holds come in at once and I think I just need a little more time! I‘m looking forward to How the Word is Passed. I already wanted to read it, and then a history professor I work with recommended it. I trusted her endorsement! 4mo
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tenar @MallenNC Me too!! And what a great endorsement. I‘m currently watching the author‘s series Crash Course Black American History on Youtube, and it‘s given me high expectations for his work! 4mo
MallenNC @tenar I will have to look for that series. 4mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! 4mo
tenar 🚨 Last minute emergency substitution! I am swapping #9 for Prelude to Foundation by Isaac Asimov, which my brother wants me to read prior to the upcoming TV adaptation. We are a sci-fi fam. 4mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Wordslut, of course I‘m reading it too. I‘ve also read the Hidden Lives of Trees and enjoyed that as well. I have not read Prelude to Foundation, let me know if it‘s good. (I‘ve only read Foundation) 4mo
tenar @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m glad, I‘m going to keep putting The Hidden Life of Trees on my list until it gets picked and read. I will let you know how Prelude goes! I‘ve also only read Foundation and am not huge on series and prequels, so I‘m a little nervous, but my brother thinks I‘ll like it. We‘ll see! 4mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @tenar I read The Hidden Life of Trees not long after Lab Girl, which I loved and highly recommend if you didn‘t read that one, I‘d recommend it too. 4mo
tenar @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I love nature nonfiction, and I think the three biggest books I haven‘t yet read have got to be The Hidden Life of Trees, Braiding Sweetgrass, and Lab Girl! You‘ve got me moving Lab Girl up the list. I wonder if #SheSaid would be interested in a nature/climate book. Have we had one on our list yet? 4mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @tenar No, we haven‘t yet. Braiding Sweetgrass was very good too. 4mo
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Pickpick

This is what I‘ve been looking for! Our Nobel-winning author stretched, altered, and enriched my conception of myself and our universe through a simplified exploration of ten choice insights from physics. Some of the bits on quantum particles have since leaked out my ears, but the sheer delight in how unusual matter is has remained. And though I‘m not much of a rereader, I think I‘d enjoy experiencing this short, fascinating book again. #BookSpin

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! 4mo
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The Lathe of Heaven | Ursula K Le Guin
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Pickpick

I‘m, again, surprised and delighted by U.K. Le Guin. This hypnotic tale, in which dreams alter reality, explores a power struggle about whether and how that ability should be used. The characters are embodiments of ideologies and the plot is a thought experiment, but this short novel ramped up the stakes so quickly and turned its twists so sharply that it was also very compulsively readable sci-fi! I especially recommend it to Philip K. Dick fans.

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Passing | Nella Larsen
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Pickpick

When The Vanishing Half wasn‘t one of my top reads last year, I felt left out! It made me want to try more takes on the central topic; this one was just my speed. I love a short book, and Passing, a 1929 work out of the Harlem Renaissance, packs a wallop for its slim size. A complex drama about the reunion of two childhood acquaintances whose lives have diverged across “the color line”, it also explores anxieties of marriage & class. #DoubleSpin

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yes, this is a good read! 4mo
TheAromaofBooks Great progress!! 4mo
tenar @Riveted_Reader_Melissa It‘s one of my favorite books I‘ve read this year! 4mo
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The Genius of Birds | Jennifer Ackerman
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Pickpick

An energetically written overview of what we know (and speculate) about the intellect of birds. Covering skills from spacial navigation to social manipulation, we meet many different species and many scientists‘ equally ingenious designs to test our feathered friends. I learned a ton, including delights like pigeons can learn to distinguish between the styles of famed impressionist painters, but the jumpy, short-winded style wasn‘t my favorite.

ChaoticMissAdventures Isn't she such a good writer? I was blown away by this one. 5mo
tenar @ChaoticMissAdventures She infused everything, from lab experiments to rainforest excursions, with the same intensity of enthusiasm and wonder! 5mo
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I‘ve gotten myself in a book mess, where I‘ve accumulated 20-odd e-books from the library, then had to disconnect my e-reader from the Wi-Fi so that it doesn‘t realize the library‘s taken them back. 😵‍💫 It started as a panicked way to hold onto a bookclub read, and it‘s gotten out of hand! I‘m going to join in on July‘s #BookSpin & #BookSpinBingo to put a dent in this collection. I‘m thrilled by these 10 fiction & 10 NF titles and happy to play!

ErinSueMreads Add this to the list of problems only a diehard book person would understand 5mo
TheAromaofBooks Yay! And I have TOTALLY been there! 😂 5mo
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My Dyslexia | Philip Schultz
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Pickpick

A brief (130 p.), moving memoir from Pulitzer-winning poet Philip Schultz about his life with dyslexia, undiagnosed until he was over fifty and his son was evaluated. He describes how school shattered his self-worth, how utterly and inexplicably hard ‘simple‘ things were, and shares the turning points of first being celebrated for his writing, and then, meaningfully, celebrated for sharing his dyslexia. A raw and open journey to self-acceptance.

tenar Notable to me was the blurbing about how the author was able to “rise above” and “defy” his disability, when he makes it beautifully clear that he believes he and his son are “special not despite, but because of” their dyslexia. #DisabilityReadathon 5mo
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Pickpick

This collection solidified UKLG as one of my top authors!

Set primarily in her famed scifi and fantasy universes, it deals with coming & going, learning & unlearning, finding your place and leaving your home behind. Space travel, politics, and magic are tools to investigate the right to know things could be different, how one discovers they could be different, and what it‘s like when your idea of the world shatters open, revealing something new.

tenar These themes are also central to my two favorite novels of hers, set each in her same scifi and fantasy universes: The Left Hand of Darkness & The Tombs of Atuan.

Super belated review of my #ChunksterChallenge2021 read!
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Amiable Yay! Congratulations on finishing! Is 816 the total page count? 5mo
tenar @Amiable Yes, that‘s right! A petite chunk 😉 Thanks for hosting this year! 5mo
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About Us: Essays from the Disability Series of the New York Times | Peter Catapano, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson
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A range of disabled writers share the variety of emotions, from fear to joy, humor to frustration, sparked by their circumstances.

An essay on living with Tourette‘s had me questioning medications not to improve health, but to make a patient palatable to society. ‘Intimacy Without Touch‘ had me in tears at the beauty in being disabled.

When disabled people express themselves, society often covers its ears. This collection is a chance to listen.

tenar Hi Litsy, I‘ve missed you! I‘m back from some of my own challenges with disability and am belatedly reviewing what I read for the #DisabilityReadathon in April. I hope you all have been as well as possible lately 🌼 6mo
LeahBergen So nice to see you again! 6mo
Amiable Welcome back! 6mo
KVanRead Welcome back!! 🤗 Great review! 6mo
tenar @LeahBergen @Amiable @KVanRead Thank y‘all! So nice to see all of you (and your books)! 6mo
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About Us: Essays from the Disability Series of the New York Times | Peter Catapano, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson
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I‘m back from outer space just in time for April and the #DisabilityReadathon! The only requirement to join is to pick up an #OwnVoices book inclusive of disability during the next month.

Here‘s what I‘ve got checked out in anticipation:
About Us: Essays from the Disability Series of the NYT, Being Heumann, a memoir from Judith Heumann (who you may have seen in Netflix‘s Crip Camp), The Pretty One, and My Dyslexia, from a Pulitzer-winning poet.

tenar To find prompts, sprints, and recommendations, check out the readathon‘s Twitter here:
https://mobile.twitter.com/DisabilityRead

And to look at a few books perfect for this readathon that I‘ve shared on Litsy, click this tag: #tdr
8mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Looks great! 8mo
ishan0986 @tenar Hey didn't see your posts from quite some time. How's everything? Trapped in a big book I suppose?? 6mo
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tenar @ishan0986 It has been a while, and I so appreciate you checking in! My reading groove got totally thrown off by other parts of my life, but I think I‘m starting to get back in the swing of things. I am still on page 600 of an 800 page U.K. LeGuin collection I started in January, so your diagnosis is correct! 😂 How are you enjoying your Kindle? 6mo
ishan0986 @tenar Happy to hear that you are getting your groove back. Buying the Kindle was the best decision this year. I do love books but the portability it offers really is amazing. 6mo
tenar @ishan0986 I‘m so glad you‘re loving it! It might be my favorite gadget. Thanks again for checking in on me! 6mo
ishan0986 @tenar Hey no need to thank me. This is one of the most amazing community and everyone here looks out of one another. I am just returning the favor. You people made this place special for me. This is the least I can do.😅🤗 6mo
tenar @ishan0986 You‘ve made me smile! This really is one of the nicest corners of the internet I‘ve ever come across. ☺️ Let‘s both try our best to give and receive that kindness. You‘re already doing it well! 6mo
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Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit | Jeanette Winterson
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Pickpick

A semi-autobiographical novel, sharp and dryly funny recounting a childhood under religious extremism. As the story progressed and Jeanette interspersed fairytale & legend to convey her mythic journey to self-acceptance, I was wanting deeper cuts, something less tidy.

But Winterson has said she “wrote a story I could live with. The other one was too painful. I could not survive it.” and a survivable lesbian story was invaluable then and is still.

kspenmoll Nice review! 8mo
tenar @kspenmoll Thank you! 🧡 8mo
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Pickpick

A star-studded and heartfelt book by and about black women writers, and one of the more consistently strong essay collections I‘ve read. My reading habits have changed for the better because of the messages here; I‘m inspired by the idea of not passively receiving what is hopefully representation, but curating a narrative to counter the one society‘s written for you. A celebration of writing and reading and black women guaranteed to grow your TBR!

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Pickpick

I worried this was only retreading ground covered in Soseki‘s earlier novels - a naive youngster out of college fumbling in the big city - but this ended up being surprisingly experimental in structure. Covered my pet favorite topic of being unable to take action outside of one‘s mind, but also touched on familial loss that was clearly personal to the author, and explored the thoughts of a unique set of characters. I can‘t help but love Soseki.

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Remnant Population | Elizabeth Moon
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Pickpick

An unexpected scifi story, better left unspoiled by the blurb! When her planet‘s colony is forced to leave, elderly Ofelia decides her best chance at peace and quiet is to stay behind. Alone. Examines capitalism and patriarchy to ask: why do we think so little of old women? She wonders: is a community that disrespects you preferable to isolation?

In turns tense, humorous, surreal, and (datedly) feminist in a mix that reminded me of Mrs. Caliban.

tenar From the cover, “Ofelia—tough, kind, wise and unwise, fond of food, tired of foolish people—is one of the most probable heroines science fiction has ever known.”—Ursula K. Le Guin 9mo
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Mind of My Mind | Octavia E. Butler
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When a young black telepath being groomed by a powerful father activates her latent powers, other loner psychics are suddenly drawn together, leading to conflict and growth.

This slim book juggles eugenics, corruption, ableism, racism, and mental illness without drawing many conclusions; I couldn‘t draw one, either. Although standalone, it‘s neither first written nor first chronologically of a loose quartet; further reading may be more rewarding.

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Not every day a New York Times best-selling author messages you back! I shared with Sonya Renee Taylor that her book, The Body Is Not an Apology, was the first nonfiction (especially activism/self-help) book not exclusively about disability that made me feel genuinely included in the audience. I often feel like a niche, unrelatable, or unmentioned subject. She‘s a star.

The 2nd edition - expanded, revised, introduced by Ijeoma Oluo - is out now!

Amiable That‘s so neat! 9mo
tenar @Amiable It made my day! 9mo
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The Deep | Rivers Solomon, Daveed Diggs, William Hutson, Jonathan Snipes
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This month I read a historian‘s grappling with the horrifying mass drowning of disabled Africans on the slave ship Le Rodeur, only to find this novella about the weight of remembering that history.

The Deep imagines the sea-dwelling descendants of enslaved people thrown overboard, exploring their choice to elect one ‘historian‘ to carry all the memories of their kind. Is being without history, especially one so devastating, a freedom or a loss?

tenar Some early problems with the writing, particularly repetitiveness, were much improved by the end of this emotional, magical tale. I was swept away. 9mo
sarahlandis This book blew me away. One of my favorites from my 2020 reads 9mo
tenar @sarahlandis I‘m glad you thought so! I‘m amazed by how touched and invested I was by the end of such a short page count, especially after I wasn‘t sure about the opening chapters. It conjured something powerful and stuck the landing! 9mo
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“Nobody knew anything about any time when things had been different. Nobody knew there was any place where things might be different. We were enslaved by the present time.”

I‘m halfway through this collection and completed the set from Le Guin‘s Hainish universe. She creates far-off planets and societies with a common ancestor to ours, then lets us teach them & them teach us other ways to be. I love her work in this vein. #ChunksterChallenge2021

Mavey Wow interesting premise! Such a beautiful cover! 9mo
tenar @Mavey Yes, I‘m delighted she has so much written under this great premise! My favorite so far is her full-length The Left Hand of Darkness, which uses the common ancestor idea to explore gender. 9mo
Mavey @tenar I'll definitely read it! Thanks for sharing!😄 9mo
Amiable Fabulous! 👍🏼 9mo
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A Raisin in the Sun | Lorraine Hansberry
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Pickpick

- Langston Hughes

I found A Raisin in the Sun both tender and brutal. The level to which Hansberry develops each unique character, each adult family member‘s dreams, lets her tackle an amazing breadth of social issues without seeming forced at all. Segregation, poverty, beauty, feminism, religion, more. It‘s masterful.

In my edition, the intro discussed what was cut for the stage & film. I was shocked - it all seemed vital! Vital in every sense.

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I‘m delighted by this #OwnVoices book list. I plan for a large portion of my reading this year to be by/inclusive of disabled people, so I need all the lists I can get!

The 3 books I‘ve read - Care Work, Disability Visibility, and Sitting Pretty - were top picks for me last year. That makes me very excited for the ones I‘ve yet to try. #tdr

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/margaretkingsbury/ownvoices-books-disabilit...

candority Thanks for sharing! 9mo
tenar @candority Of course! 😊 I thought the essay collection including authors like V.E. Schwab and Libba Bray might be of particular interest here! 9mo
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The Farthest Shore | Ursula K. Le Guin
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Pickpick

I found this novel‘s portrayal of fear, depression, and loneliness moving, but I feel this was slightly the weakest of the beautiful Earthsea trilogy. I wonder if Le Guin felt she needed to balance her unconventional themes with a very conventional young prince protagonist.

Yet it was a sound and fitting end to an arc, and meaningful in its journey to explore death as both key to the balance of life and as a reality personally, inevitably faced.

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Pickpick

Tender, gentle, patient. A spirit of non-judging, of empathy, of care. About how we can help each other live in our uncertain, ephemeral world.

Just seeing elderly or disabled people being appreciated as full, valuable human beings is enough to get me emotional these days, and the relationship between the housekeeper and the professor healed a little bit of my soul.

I finally read this thanks to @BarbaraBB‘s love of it; I‘m so glad I did!

BarbaraBB I‘m glad you loved it too! It‘s quite a unique book I think! 💜 10mo
tenar @BarbaraBB It was unique! I was so impressed by the author‘s thoughtful blending of math into the story. I read that the original title means “The Professor's Beloved Equation”, and that made me smile. 💜 10mo
batsy Lovely review and photo. 10mo
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tenar @batsy Thank you so much! It‘s a lovely book. 10mo
IuliaC Beautiful review and good to know about the original title! I really liked this book 10mo
tenar @IuliaC Thank you very much! I‘m delighted so many here on Litsy liked it as much as I did. 10mo
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Mehso-so

This was clever, twisty, everything a Christie should be, yet we didn‘t click.

The first third is without Mrs. Marple, and our victim is only introduced after he‘s hit the floor. No hook for me, but I pressed on. While I enjoyed exploring the lush, tangled, very British web woven around the crime, as well as the book‘s discussion of quality of life and will to live, these made the total carnage too distressing for me to enjoy the cheery epilogue!

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Readathon Wrap-up! I didn‘t manage #20in4, but I did read 13 hours in 5 and hit the 10 hour goal in the #BooklyReadathon. It‘s been surprisingly fun. Across the five days I read from these seven books:

•The US Antifascism Reader, Mullen
•To the Spring Equinox & Beyond, Soseki
•The Found & the Lost, Le Guin
✔️The Farthest Shore, Le Guin
✔️A Raisin in the Sun, Hansberry
✔️Remnant Population, Moon
✔️The 7 Necessary Sins for Women & Girls, Eltahawy

Andrew65 That‘s fantastic 👏👏👏🙌🍾🥂🍾🥂🎉🥳 Thanks for playing along. 10mo
tenar @Andrew65 Thank you for hosting - you did amazing hitting your 20 hours even with work! I aspire to get closer next time! 😌 10mo
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tenar
The Tombs of Atuan | Ursula K. Le Guin
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Pickpick

Isolated, ritualized, & indoctrinated, Arha is the young high-priestess of the Nameless Ones. Her story is like night and day compared to the first book of Earthsea - a labyrinth instead of open sea, gloom where there was light. And a rigid hand driving her into the darkness.

I‘d love to write of her journey, but it would spoil this short book! Although dark & fantastical, it tenderly touches my own lived experience of transformation. A favorite.

rockpools Beautiful review! 10mo
tenar @rockpools Thank you very much! 💜 It‘s a beautiful book. 10mo
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tenar
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This week I bought an out-of-town card for the Brooklyn Public Library, and every day I wake up thrilled and overwhelmed by all I could read. I‘ve got 10 books on hold and dozens tagged, many the Japanese classics and disability literature my local library just doesn‘t carry.

Is there a better time for not one, but two readathons? @Andrew65‘s #20in4 overlaps with the winter #BooklyReadathon, and I have my calendar cleared and my e-reader loaded!

Andrew65 They merge very nicely. Good luck 😊👍 10mo
tenar @Andrew65 Thank you for hosting! Happy reading! 😊 10mo
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tenar
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The #fivefingerbookchallenge seemed like a fun way to chat up books I haven‘t yet mentioned on Litsy.

👍🏻 Book I loved: The Three Cornered World, AKA Kusamakura. Natsume Soseki has been my favorite author for years, and this is tied with The Gate as my favorite of his books. I hope to reread both this year.
☝🏻 Book I recommend: Disability Visibility. I want the whole world to read this collection!
(Continued in comments.)

tenar 🖕🏻 Book I disliked: The Dispossessed. I lived & breathed for the first three Le Guin novels I read, then I bailed on this one! Dare I try again?
💍 Character I‘d marry: Can I pick a real person? Reading her letters in 84, Charing Cross Road, I was smitten with Helene Hanff‘s generosity, humor, and passion for books.
🤙🏻 Book I pinky-promise to read: Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit. I have this copy on display but haven‘t even read it!
(edited) 10mo
LeahBergen Hanff!! 💗💗 10mo
meghathecloud Which one of Soseki's works would you say will be a good one to start with? I'm considering reading Kokoro soon. 10mo
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tenar @meghathecloud I think it‘d be hard to start wrong with Soseki, so you have choices to suit your mood! Kokoro is dark and deeply Japanese, Sanshiro is a lighter ‘coming of age‘, Kusamakura is near-plotless contemplation on art, and I Am a Cat vol.1 is social satire from a cat‘s POV! I started with Kokoro like most readers, but I fell in love when I read Sanshiro next. Delightfully, all are well under 300 pages. I‘m excited for you! 10mo
meghathecloud Thank you! I think I'll go with either Kokoro or I Am a Cat as it sounds right up my alley. 10mo
tenar @meghathecloud Sure thing! I Am a Cat was first a short story, then serialized, so each chapter is rather self-contained and easy to dip in and out of, whereas I think I read Kokoro nearly straight through. Hope you enjoy! 10mo
tenar @LeahBergen Such a charmer! Have you read any of her other work? I was looking next to try 10mo
LeahBergen Oh, yes! Definitely read that one. I also really enjoyed 10mo
tenar @LeahBergen I hadn‘t even seen that one, delightful! Like a Charing Cross trilogy. Thank you, I can‘t wait to hear more from Hanff! 10mo
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Mehso-so

Entangled Life is a light philosophical exploration of how the darkly understood, deeply unusual realm of fungi does not conform to our ideas of evolution, individuality, sentience, or nearly any tidy category of being we humans have invented.

But each time I felt this book hitting its stride, introducing new concepts and species, it would pull up short, circle, reword, and repeat whatever (great!) query we were pondering. Padded with repetition.

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A 2020 #SheSaid book club read I‘m still thinking about! Malala Yousafzai is, among so many other things, a displaced person. In this book she shares how this truth shapes her everyday outlook, then presents nine interconnected, personal stories from other displaced girls she has met around the world.

Until this book I had read /about/ refugees, but I had never heard from the people behind the statistics and reportage. 👇🏻

tenar It makes all the difference, especially when reading a first-hand experience at the border of my own country. The stories are presented in a way that makes real the tragedy of displacement and also, crucially, lit a fire in this reader to get involved. 10mo
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tenar
Mrs. Caliban: A Novel | Rachel Ingalls
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Mehso-so

A depressed housewife has her desires fulfilled when a hulking fishman escapes from a laboratory and walks into her kitchen.

Unfortunately I couldn‘t emotionally follow this all the way to its dramatic end - I didn‘t know what I was meant to be feeling. But I loved its tender subversiveness, both in its upending of monster tropes and in its questioning of the unwritten rules of society, marriage, & gender. Brief, unique, feminist, worth a read.

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The US Antifascism Reader | Bill V. Mullen, Christopher Vials
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Radical publisher Verso has made The US Antifascism Reader free to download or to email to an e-reader, and I find myself curious to try it.

“This reader reconstructs the history of US antifascism ... showing how generations of writers, organisers, and fighters spoke to each other over time.” It begins in the 1930s, including famous authors like W. E. B. Du Bois & Sinclair Lewis.

https://versobooks.com/books/3089-the-us-antifascism-reader

sarahlandis Thank you for posting!!!! I definitely want to read this 10mo
tenar @sarahlandis Fantastic, I‘m glad I did! I hope we both learn a ton! 10mo
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I‘m joining #ChunksterChallenge2021 with The Found and the Lost novella collection.

I‘m also in the midst of Entangled Life, a philosophical look at how fungi defy our understanding of what is an individual and what constitutes a brain. Such a delight when Le Guin‘s first story, Vaster Than Empires and More Slow, created a group of astronauts grappling with the same ideas.

Tonight I‘ll dream of a great, unknown sentience, right under the soil!

Amiable Welcome to the Chunkster Challenge Crew! 10mo
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tenar
The Honjin Murders | Seishi Yokomizo
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Pickpick

An elaborate 1946 puzzle box murder mystery that launched a quirky private investigator & his long-running series. I was enthralled by the intricate crime and its framing - a mystery writer is retelling the events after the fact, referencing classic detective fiction. Cheeky.

But I found the ultimate solution so disturbing it marred my enjoyment. The novel‘s characters being disturbed right along with me was the difference between a pick & a pan!

batsy I definitely want to read this, and your take on the resolution has further piqued my interest! 11mo
tenar @batsy I wrote you a few different encouraging replies, but I think all hinted at the contents of the book in some way. So I‘ll just say I‘m excited to hear what you think! 10mo
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tenar
A Wizard of Earthsea | Ursula K. Le Guin
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Pickpick

A reread! This short coming-of-age tale is Western fantasy with Eastern philosophy. A parable about how pride can drive one to their greatest regret, and how a turn to humility and connection can lead to redemption.

Le Guin‘s battles are of wisdom and heart, not might, and Earthsea‘s magic system is not only folkloreish and lovely, but a key aspect of the book‘s emotional journey. These qualities make the lessons learned feel deeply meaningful.

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A delight! I planned to flip through this book of women nature writers to broaden my TBR, but it ended up being more than just a list of dry profiles & bibliographies. The author is a nature writer herself and spoke to many of those featured who are still living, even traveling to some of the places they had written about. Not only do the featured writers come to life, but so do their wild places. A wide-ranging celebration of women in the world!

batsy This sounds really fascinating! And the cover is so striking. 11mo
tenar @batsy It was, and the illustrator also knocked it out of the park! You can see the wrap-around cover and some of the lovely author portraits here: https://www.workman.com/products/writing-wild 11mo
batsy @tenar Thank you for the link! Those are lovely. 11mo
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Mrs. Caliban: A Novel | Rachel Ingalls
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In an effort to pep myself out of a deep December reading slump, I‘m going to try to squeeze these three under-200-pagers in before the year‘s end.

We have a classic Japanese locked-room murder mystery, a repressed housewife‘s magical realism affair with a fishman, and a tale of a powerful young mage and his dark shadow - a reread, rare for me.

Wish me luck! I hope you all are having as lovely of a holiday season as is possible right now.

rockpools Good luck! I love the covers of all three of these 😊 11mo
Suet624 Good luck!! 11mo
tenar I did it, y‘all! Thanks so much for wishing me luck @rockpools @Suet624 ☺️ 11mo
Suet624 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻🎉🎉🎉🎊🎊 11mo
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The Woman in White | William Wilkie Collins
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Wow, this 1859 novel has it all! A rich cast of characters, an inciting incident on a spooky night, a pure-hearted romance, legal puzzles, detective thrills, secret correspondence, questions of identity, and intense sexism and ableism!

I love tracing lineages in media, and many books I‘ve enjoyed owe this one quite a lot, especially My Cousin Rachel and Fingersmith. I recommend The Woman in White for readers with similar taste, but 👇🏻

tenar Please take care to apply to this book‘s treatment of its disabled characters, particularly Anne Catherick, Mr. Fairlie, and Margaret Porcher, the same critical eye you‘d naturally apply to its treatment of women and gender. 11mo
BarbaraBB Such a good book!! 11mo
Suet624 I read this when I was much too young. I really should it again. 11mo
tenar @BarbaraBB It was so good, especially the last stretch! I had hit a total reading slump midway, and your earlier comment fed my determination to finish this one. It was well worth the effort! 11mo
tenar @Suet624 I bet it would hold up well to a reread! It‘s so carefully plotted and develops such a lovely trio of characters to root for. 11mo
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