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megnews

megnews

Joined September 2016

review
megnews
Santa in the City | Tiffany D. Jackson
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Pickpick

How does Santa do it all? Especially in the city?
This was a fun picture book.

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The Silver Arrow | Lev Grossman
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Pickpick

A magical middle grade journey.

25 likes1 stack add
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The Edge of Lost | Kristina Mcmorris
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Pickpick

What a ride! With many twists and turns, Shanley Keagan led quite a life. Can‘t say more til Saturday‘s discussion. Can‘t wait!

#OverBookedClub

sblbooks Me either, I really enjoyed this one. 1d
47 likes1 comment
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megnews
A Christmas Carol | Charles Dickens
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I thought this free audio advent calendar sounded like fun!

https://themerrybeggars.com/a-christmas-carol?utm_source=relevantradio&utm_mediu...

DebinHawaii Fun! Thank you for the link! 🤗 2d
Tamra I signed up! 1d
41 likes2 comments
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A Pocketful of Crows | Joanne M Harris
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Pickpick

My nearby hometown recently replaced the library I grew up with and still frequented. I had to take a look and in doing so, noticed this beautiful book on the shelves. This new fairy tale was a quick read with beautiful illustrations. I‘m looking forward to the other fairy tales the author has written.

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megnews
If I Ever Get Out of Here | Eric Gansworth
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Pickpick

This is listed as middle grade and YA. Considering it‘s length and some of the subject matter, I‘d recommend for YA. I‘d also highly recommend this. It touches on being Native among a white majority, loneliness, bullying, military families, and is a tribute music, particularly the Beetles and Paul McCartney.

#NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

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megnews
1619 Project: Born on the Water | Rene Watson, Nikole Hannah-Jones
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Pickpick

Just finished the audio of this picture book. If the cover is any indication, I can‘t wait to see the illustrations. A great addition to school, classroom, & home libraries.
Anticipating great discussions during the #1619GroupRead coming in January. See the original announcement @4thhouseontheleft ‘s page for more info.

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The Way Past Winter | Kiran Millwood Hargrave
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megnews
Scrooge #worstgiftever | Charles Dickens, Brett Wright
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Mehso-so

A very modern retelling of A Christmas Carol—through texts & social media posts. Cute enough for a quick holiday read. 🎄

41 likes3 stack adds
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megnews
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Pickpick

After trying to hold out reading my Nov TBR, I didn‘t regret caving in and switching over to wintery holiday stories after reading this juvenile fiction. See & hear the sights, feel the freezing cold, and smell the gingerbread as you time travel to the London of yesteryear in this chapter book. ❄️

39 likes3 stack adds
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megnews
Indian No More | Traci Sorell, Charlene Willing McManis
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Pickpick

Follow Regina as her tribe is disbanded and she moves from Oregon to Los Angeles, trying to hold fast to her culture. As an adult, you will be angry at the lies told by the US govt to disband the Umpqua tribe in Oregon. As a child, you will learn some untaught US history and more. I would recommend this for classrooms.

#DoubleSpin #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

TheAromaofBooks Great progress!! 5d
49 likes2 stack adds1 comment
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megnews
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Reminder on #OverBookedClub‘s December pick. Due to the December calendar, I will be posting questions early afternoon Friday December 31. Join in conversation when you can. All are welcome! If you aren‘t tagged and would like to be, let me know.

Crazeedi I have the book on loan from library! 6d
TheBookHippie Sounds good. 6d
kspenmoll Please add me! 19h
41 likes3 comments
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Reminder to all those who plan to read along & discuss with #MGBuddyRead and/or #YABuddyRead. Due to my December schedule, I will be posting MG discussion questions Sunday 12/12. YA Sat 12/18. Join the conversation when you can. All welcome! If you aren‘t tagged and would like to be, please let me know.

SamanthaMarie Woohoo!! So excited!! 📚🥰 6d
Bklover Could I join in on The Bear and the Nightingale? 5d
megnews @Bklover absolutely! I added you to the list 5d
Bklover Thanks! 😘 4d
38 likes4 comments
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megnews
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Lots of DNFs on this one. Is it because we aren‘t the target audience? Who do you feel might be, specifically, if any?

megnews Obviously, this is a YA book. Angsty teens, particularly those in foster care, may benefit more from this story. But there‘s something else that makes me think this book isn‘t necessarily “for me” and so I may not be able to understand. Maybe it‘s a cultural thing-the history & impact of alcoholism & foster care due to oppression that I can see but never fully understand. Though I need to read stories about others‘ experiences & can try to 7d
megnews understand, maybe I never fully will. That‘s ok. Because everyone needs to have stories they can relate to. I‘m even wondering if that is some of what was going on with “I Can Make This Promise” this month as well. Thoughts? (edited) 7d
IndoorDame @megnews I think you may be right that it‘s written for a very specific audience. Which is fine. There should be books that Native kids in foster care relate to even if those books are just for them. On the other hand, I think the writing itself was only okay here (as in it was clear but not transporting), and if it had been something special it would likely have spoken to a much wider audience. 7d
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TheBookHippie It reminded me of kids we‘ve had as respite care, and a ton of kids I mentor. It was realist to what I‘ve seen. To see it in a book is so good. It‘s life, I didn‘t have a hard time reading it because it‘s what I see, daily and try but fail to convey to others. 7d
mrp27 I‘m glad I stick it out and finished. Was hoping for more resolution. It was a very confusing read because I simply don‘t understand it‘s tone. I wish there was more about Native American culture, to me it felt secondary. 6d
megnews @mrp27 agree somewhat but I felt it made sense since he‘s somewhat disconnected from his community being in foster care. 6d
31 likes6 comments
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IndoorDame The two things I saw spurning that relationship on were that she presented herself like a puzzle, intentionally offering up little pieces designed to make him want to know more about her. And that she was the closest thing he had to a connection to home, and with her he was less lonely. 7d
megnews @IndoorDame agree though I hadn‘t thought that far into. I assumed it was the fascination of a younger boy on a more developed, seen as “sophisticated,” girl. 7d
IndoorDame @megnews Yes. That too. I think that would definitely have been a part of what drew her to him. 7d
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TheBookHippie Intrigued and intertwined in her without knowing truly why is the best description I have. 7d
IndoorDame @TheBookHippie I like that description. Very poetic. 7d
mrp27 I agree she seemed mysterious and intriguing to him. He wanted to know her. 6d
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megnews I‘m interested to hear how others interpreted this. Did he feel, in one way or another, they were all already dead because of the lives they felt stuck in? 7d
IndoorDame I picture Rosemary‘s spot in the woods when I hear this title. So I suppose I think that dead is kind of a metaphor for depression in this instance. 7d
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TheBookHippie Dead inside to survive 7d
megnews @TheBookHippie yes. Very sad. 6d
Butterfinger They were so enamored with death. I wished there was more to Rosemary's dreams or something about the nature/spiritual side of things. I think children into Goth would appreciate this work, but a part of me wants to keep the book away from them. 6d
mrp27 I honestly don‘t even know what to think about the story let alone the title! 6d
megnews @Butterfinger @mrp27 @IndoorDame @TheBookHippie it‘s almost like we didn‘t even read the same book! 6d
mrp27 Agreed! I see all the points everyone is making and I tend to agree but I was too focused on the creepy tone. 6d
TheBookHippie @Butterfinger @megnews yes -everyone reads books differently-because I didn‘t read it as consumed with death or creepy. It is. It‘s how thousands upon thousands of kids live. I see it daily. 6d
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megnews Hard to tell. Did he keep too much to himself? I hate to think he blamed himself all these years. Ultimately all too often you don‘t know when it will happen, even if you think it might. 7d
IndoorDame @megnews I also hope he didn‘t blame himself. It would be easy for a young boy who was infatuated with her like he was to think he played a role, but ultimately she was the only actor in that situation. 7d
TheBookHippie It‘s just hard. I hope he doesn‘t harbor guilt. The answer is always inside the person, that‘s hard to rationalise sometimes. 7d
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Butterfinger I saw it as an ambiguous ending. Did it say he tried to take the gun from her? He was angry at her. He had already had visions of hurting her. I just saw it differently. 6d
mrp27 I‘m with @Butterfinger. This whole book was very ambiguous. My first thought was he killed her. 6d
megnews @Butterfinger @mrp27 how interesting. I agree it was very vague but hadn‘t even considered this possibility especially since she‘d been withdrawing more & more. Gives me something to think about. 6d
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megnews They seem to be wrapped up in their own issues. Perhaps a bit of inappropriate sharing. At times, I think they‘re being very sensitive to teen needs. Others I felt they left them to their own devices too much. 7d
IndoorDame @megnews I agree that they‘re left to their own devices too much. And that they‘re inconsistent in their parenting and occasionally inappropriate. But they do seem to be caring people who want the best for the kids. And this seems to be the best situation all of the kids have found in a long time. 7d
megnews @IndoorDame I agree. I imagine by this age in the foster care system, parents have to be a bit more hands off or you may end up with a lot of problems on your hands—runaways etc. 7d
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TheBookHippie Hands off is required to some degree I agree, it has to be paired with absolute consistency I think. In my experience routine is a comfort. I still have kids I‘ve mentored or fostered -now adults take comfort in some of the things I do routinely -it‘s security in a different form. I do think they care. It‘s so difficult you never really know if you‘re doing it correctly. 7d
Butterfinger @TheBookHippie I am glad you said that. Routine is definitely security. You come to know the outcome. There are no surprises to someone who has been in unstable situations. I think the Troutts tried. You always hear of awful stories of the foster system in the 80s. 6d
mrp27 Although not a shining example, I think they did the best they could. But I kept kept expecting worse from them as they too seemed mysterious. 6d
megnews @Butterfinger yes and the group homes in the 80s too! 6d
megnews @mrp27 I felt they were too. It was hard to put your finger on. The whole swinger conversation was weird. 6d
TheBookHippie @Butterfinger group homes early 80s is where I started my nursing career. No words. 6d
10 likes9 comments
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IndoorDame Sequoyah doesn‘t seem dangerous, but I could see George being afraid of him anyway because he represented an upset to what little stability he‘d had in a very uncertain world. 7d
megnews @IndoorDame I agree. I took these questions from the publisher website and was surprised at this one. I never felt he was dangerous. George seems very sensitive. Nothing wrong with that. I just interpreted it as a George issue more than Sequoyah. 7d
TheBookHippie I‘m not sure dangerous is the word a threat to George‘s security maybe ? 7d
Butterfinger I felt he was dangerous. #unpopularopinion. He kept wanting to "kill" George. I think George understood him on some level. 6d
mrp27 I felt he was dangerous too, I didn‘t trust him. But I am so confused as how to look at this book. On one hand it feels like a creepy thriller. Was he dangerous and did he murder Nora and his other friend? How does he know the exact dates and manner of death? Was he responsible for Rosemary‘s death? Or was this simply a story about a young traumatized kid going through the system? 6d
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megnews I‘m not sure how reliable he is. Clearly, he tried to hide some of what went on with his mom. 7d
TheBookHippie I think no. Intuitively I think there‘s something hidden that isn‘t spoken of, reminds me of when I‘m talking with traumatised youth. I can‘t put my finger on it exactly. 7d
megnews @TheBookHippie I know what you‘re talking about. It is hard to put a word to it. 6d
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Butterfinger I thought that too. He knew things about prostituting oneself. He just knew things. How did he intuitively know to leave that one man's house when he saw the children just sitting around? 6d
Butterfinger I didn't answer the question. I just don't know if he is a reliable narrator. Is that why the author wrote Sequoyah the way he did? To leave us wondering how exactly did the girl die? 6d
mrp27 I don‘t think he was reliable at all but was he unreliable because of experienced trauma or was he hiding things? 6d
megnews @Butterfinger I think he was old enough to have seen news reports on sex trafficking etc. I‘m learning the Native community is really preyed on in regards to this. 6d
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IndoorDame His adult voice is remarkably patient. It helps communicate that the young character was resigned to his fate, but it‘s missing the sense of urgency that most teenagers experience, even ones who are depressed. 7d
megnews @IndoorDame great point. Telling a story in real time is different than looking back. What was important then may not feel so much anymore and vice versa. He may also downplay or over play certain things. (edited) 7d
TheBookHippie @IndoorDame it‘s missing the angst, yes? 7d
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TheBookHippie @megnews I agree with you, perspective changes so very much. 7d
IndoorDame @TheBookHippie yes. I think that‘s one of the things that‘s definitely downplayed in the recollection. 7d
megnews @TheBookHippie I missed tagging you! So sorry! Glad you saw the posts. 6d
TheBookHippie @megnews 😂😂 no problem 6d
Butterfinger He was brutally honest about his feelings. Would a teen admit that he wanted to cause pain to someone? 6d
mrp27 I too think he was brutally honest with what he thought and felt but I wished he explained more why he thought that or felt that. Wish there was more insight. 6d
12 likes9 comments
review
megnews
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Pickpick

As I‘ve said about every other Albom novel, go read this book. It didn‘t replace my favorite Alboms, but still worthy of 5 stars. (Pictured alongside my library haul.)

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megnews
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I can tell you this stuff still happens. My ex is Black and this happened to us the first time we bought a new car together, significantly different than my own personal previous experiences. He was so used to stuff like this but I was ticked. We left and, like Robert, I contacted the Manager & told him we could have drove off the lot with any car there but they lost that sale. Still get mad thinking about it. #othersuns

Jari-chan Unbelievable! 🤨 7d
megnews @Jari-chan yep! We knew exactly what vehicle we wanted because we‘d done our research beforehand. At first, I thought he was just being a salesman showing us options, but when the options were all used and cheaper, I started getting heated. 7d
DaveGreen7777 So sorry your Ex was treated that way! Racism sucks so bad! 😔 7d
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megnews @DaveGreen7777 it does. I don‘t like complaining about this stuff on the internet especially when it‘s not me it impacts like it does someone else. But so many people think this doesn‘t happen anymore so I try to share a little. The sad part was how he seemed so resigned to it because he was so used to it. (edited) 7d
DaveGreen7777 @megnews I understand what you mean. I remember reading a post from a white woman about a time when she playfully said “Race you to the car” to her black boyfriend, and when he got to the car, he asked her never to run in front of her like that again, because he was afraid of someone assuming he was chasing her. Again, what really haunted me reading that was how used to prejudice her boyfriend apparently was! ☹️ 7d
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @DaveGreen7777 So sad, and even more sad he has a point and was correct. Too many would assume bad things, which could mean very bad outcomes for him. 7d
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews These stories are so important because I think way too many people think this is in the past, and just cannot see all the racism still occurring around them. 7d
37 likes7 comments
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Ida Mae, George, & Robert are finally settling in to their new homes. It‘s amazing to me how similar the reaction to Great Migration was to immigration. With previous generations, even from the same race & country, not necessarily welcoming new families in. What did you think? What were your thoughts on the advice provided by the Chicago Defender & Urban League? What else did you note in your reading this week?
#OtherSuns

Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m finding this whole book fascinating to read, but it‘s hard to just pick out 1 thing to talk about. She has done such a good job at making these stories of lives flow so well together. I loved that the doctor had finally made a place & practice for himself, I also love the very human quality of feeling in competition with his father-in-law and being able to provide as well…such a universal never-ending human issue. I loved the tidbits ⤵️ 7d
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ about his “famous” patient. George and Inez keep pulling me back in too, all that work to escape, and he is ridding the rails permanently now, still couldn‘t get back to school. His descriptions of NY at that time remind me if parts of The Autobiography of Malcolm X, that scene of singers, dancers, gamblers, and artists must have been such an amazing time to live in, it always sounds half imaginary to me. Ida has the most down to earth life⤵️ 7d
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ at least to me….worrying about children, neighbors, fitting in, again such human universal reactions….and I am so appreciative of the fact that she got to interview these people before they passed, so we get those details that make history more real, then just the facts history without personalization we usually get. I hope that makes sense. (edited) 7d
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa I think the side stories that stick out to me this week are still Jesse Owens was JC Owens but misunderstood and got stuck with it, and I now want to read his autobiography….and the story of the organizer who had to basically hide out even after his job was taken from him, because he was the face of that job. Such a testament to organizing and says so much about how big organizations don‘t always understand what‘s going on on-the-ground. (edited) 7d
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I agree with everything you‘ve said here. Definitely makes sense. I love the stories. It takes it from learning facts to seeing how it impacted actual people & families. I always feel what you‘re saying when I read about NYC in that time period. So magical. What was your take on the adjustment rules of the Defender & Urban League? Helpful or respectability politics? Seemed a little of both but leaning toward the latter. 6d
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews Both, definitely respectability politics, but what choice did they have….they desperately wanted to be seen as equal and worthy of all the same justice, jobs, rights, everything….and the stereotypes that tried to “other” them were all based on making them seem “less than” based on illererate, lazy, immoral, what-have-you, so it was their way of both trying to educate & help the new comers to fit in, but also disprove the stereotypes. 6d
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @megnews Every new comers tries in some way to fit in by doing what the supposedly in “accepted” group is doing…whether it is new immigrants, moving to a new town and joining the PTA/church, or kids changing school, everyone wants to fit in and be accepted. I think it‘s just part of human nature to want to be accepted socially and not outcast. 6d
Butterfinger I understand helping the newcomers adjust into fitting in their new environments, but I was glad that they kept part of their old selves. Especially with food. Ida Mae and Robert wanted to keep that small piece of themselves. I was surprised that Dean Martin's Riveria was so bigoted. In Davis's autobiography, Frank Sinatra wouldn't participate in a Vegas show or hotel if Sammy Davis Jr couldn't participate. I assumed Martin would have known that. Which is why Jimmy Gay thought it would be okay. 6d
Butterfinger I know Davis helped to break down the walls in Vegas. I love the personal stories and how it ties with the larger historical picture. Ida May's first time voting without persecution. 6d
BarbaraTheBibliophage This book is just so amazing. Like @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I am finding connections to many other books I‘ve read previously. Another from Harlem that comes to mind is Ralph Ellison‘s Invisible Man. And Whatever Happened to Interracial Love by Kathleen Collins. I am actually way ahead in our schedule so I put it down for a bit and that‘s making it hard to comment. 🤪 6d
megnews @Butterfinger I love that they kept pieces of themselves too. 3d
megnews @BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘m behind in responding and reading as my daughter came home from college this week. I‘ve had Invisible Man on my tbr forever. Really need to get to it. 2d
Butterfinger I'm out of town with my girls for a week and I just realized I didn't pack my book. I only brought my Kindle. On the other hand, I will finish the Overbooked. 2d
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Untitled | Unknown
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#WeeklyForecast
Hope to finish all these, if not by the end of the week, the end of November.

Cinfhen Can it already be the end of the month??? Time is flying 7d
megnews @Cinfhen yes and where did this year go??!! 7d
Cinfhen I know!!!! Crazzy 7d
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Untitled | Unknown
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I finished these 5 + 4 picture books this week.

#BookReport

Cinfhen I recently read this short but powerful book - amazing how acutely aware the author was 1w
megnews @Cinfhen I agree. I read it in less than an hour. Powerful writing, punch to the heart. 7d
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Untitled | Unknown
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Update on this month‘s #BookSpinBingo progress. I finished my #bookspin. Currently reading my #doublespin and 2 others on the board with hopes to start 2 others soon. I still don‘t see a way to a bingo this month as I‘ve gotten distracted by unplanned shiny stories and done more mood reading this month.

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! Looking great!! 1w
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Address Unknown | Kathrine Kressmann Taylor
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Pickpick

As I read this power-packed sucker punch short novel, first published in 1938, I thought to myself this is perfection. After reading, I found the 1939 NYT Book Review stated, ‘This modern story is perfection itself. It is the most effective indictment of Nazism to appear in fiction.‘ I have nothing else to add but: read it!

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14 Cows for America | Carmen Agra Deedy
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What a beautiful picture book about a beautiful gift, from the Maasai to the US after 9/11.

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Went ahead and finished this #SheSaid pick up on audio today. I learned about African American leaders of the women‘s movement, including details on some famous figures lives that made me realize I only know small parts of their stories. This book made me Google quite a few times and makes me want to read more on certain people. This rating is probably not fair but it‘s just more about my pickiness in regards to nonfiction than it is the👇🏻

megnews book itself. Non fiction history lovers will love it. 1w
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Love, love, love Mitch Albom!

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This short picture book introduces the reader to historical and more modern day Native American heroes and encourages children to go show the world what they can do too. Look closely at the beautiful illustrations.

#NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

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Crazy Brave | Joy Harjo
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Joy Harjo has a beautiful spirit. I‘m thankful to have read her memoir. Looking forward to Poet Warrior and more of her poetry.

#NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

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Indian Shoes | Cynthia L. Smith
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A chapter book of related short stories of Ray & his Grampa, Cherokee-Seminoles living in Chicago. There was something so wholesome about this book and I would recommend it for school library & classroom shelves.

#NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

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Jane Eyre | Charlotte Bront
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I read this many times as a younger person and it‘s been many years since the last time I read it. Jane Eyre is complicated, more so than I recalled. I‘m thankful for @peanutnine for hosting the #eyrereadalong. Otherwise, I might not have found an opportunity to get back to this classic.

peanutnine Thanks for reading along with me! I've enjoyed our discussions 😊 2w
batsy I love that cover! 2w
megnews @batsy I was reading this on kindle library loan over a few months‘ time. There were many covers to choose from but I had to opt for a more old fashioned looking one for Jane Eyre rather than the many modernized choices. 😊 2w
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The Last of the Spirits | Chris Priestley
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All are welcome to join #MGBuddyRead and #YABuddyRead next month as we travel to London for a retelling of A Christmas Carol and Russia for a fairy tale fantasy. Please let me know if you plan to read along one or both if you would like to be tagged for discussion.

Johanna414 Bear and the Nightingale is one of my favorites, so definitely count me in on the discussion! 2w
Chrissyreadit Yes I plan to read. 2w
Lmstraubie @megnews Sorry I haven't been participating. Please keep tagging me. I hope to join back in. 2w
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erzascarletbookgasm I‘ll love to read the MG book but can‘t find a copy. Library doesn‘t have it. But I‘ll join the YA read 👍 2w
catebutler I‘m planning on it! 2w
peanutnine I'd like to join for the Bear and the Nightingale! 2w
sblbooks @erzascarletbookgasm same here, I've been having trouble finding a copy. 2w
IndoorDame I‘m planning on reading both! 2w
MehoLovesReading I won't be able to read these with you for next month sorry 2w
Kdgordon88 Really looking forward to the YA pic and will look for a copy of the MG pic. Thanks for the reminder! 2w
BarbaraJean Please tag me for both—there are limited library copies of the MG read and holds have been taking longer lately, but I‘m in line and hoping it comes in time! 2w
Roary47 I‘m in for YA this coming month. 😊 2w
LibrarianRyan I‘m behind but please tag me. 2w
RedxoHearts I'm hoping to join in for the YA book so please tag me :) It's been on my to read list for awhile 2w
bthegood please tag me for the MG book - I love all versions of A Christmas Carol so I'm looking forward to this read- thanks for doing this - (edited) 2w
Butterfinger There is an uncomfortable scene in The Bear and the Nightingale. Blasphemy. I liked it, but that one scene keeps me from continuing the series. I felt I had to warn you Megan. Let me know if it's just my imagination. 1w
megnews @Butterfinger interesting. I‘ll let you know. 1w
megnews @peanutnine @RedxoHearts I‘ve added you to the list. 1w
megnews @MehoLovesReading no problem. I‘ll tag you again for January. Join when you‘re able. 😊 1w
MehoLovesReading @megnews okay thanks ♥️ 1w
Cazxxx I‘d like to join for the bear and the nightingale 😊 1w
megnews @Cazxxx added you to the list! 1w
Cazxxx @megnews great thanks! 1w
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Untitled | Unknown
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Finished 2/4 of my planned books this week plus some others, mainly graphic novels. #BookReport

Cinfhen Love the graphics 😍 2w
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I Can Make This Promise | Christine Day
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Thanks for joining #MGBuddyRead! Anything else you‘d like to discuss?

BarbaraJean I loved this book! But I kind of wanted more closure at the end with the Amelia storyline. Their friendship was an important part of the story and I felt like that thread didn‘t get tied up at the end. I guess it was realistic to leave things with the split over the film, but I wanted more resolution. (I kinda wanted to see Edie & Serenity win the film festival and see Libby & Amelia lose…but I realize that was not Edie‘s focus or motivation!) 2w
megnews @BarbaraJean 😂 I sort of felt the same. I wanted to see it amazing Edie‘s way. But as you said, it was not like Edie to be like that. Pretty classy kid. 2w
sblbooks Great book, Thank you for hosting! 2w
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megnews @sblbooks glad you enjoyed it! 2w
Roary47 I was trying to figure out why they kept this part of Edie‘s life a secret. I get why they wouldn‘t want to tell her about her mom being stolen from her grandma, but why not mention the house or her great uncle? Was there a reason to keep it a secret? Or is it just to help the plot of the story? I liked the story it just felt like Edie‘s grandma was someone to be ashamed of the entire time. Maybe I just read into it wrong. 🤷‍♀️ (edited) 2w
megnews @Roary47 after I read your review I meant to include a question about this & forgot. My take, which includes reading the repetitive theme of residential schools & foster care in indigenous stories, is that it is something with a lot of shame. It can often be due to or lead to alcoholism, poverty etc so even for that caseworker to see Edith as unworthy of being a parent was shameful & devastating. Therefore not something they wanted to talk about. 2w
megnews I think it was ridiculous that the caseworker and state could do that. But that‘s why the Indian child welfare act was necessary. 2w
TheBookHippie @megnews we‘ve had respite foster kids that were Indian and they had totally different governing. Although I think personally they should have been at the reservation and as adults, that‘s were they are today. They were given a huge disservice being taken away from their culture. Awful. 2w
megnews @TheBookHippie I agree. I‘m glad they made their ways home again. 2w
Butterfinger @Roary47 I think it just hurt her mom so much, she was bottling it up and didn't want to talk about it. She just wasn't ready to talk. 1w
Chrissyreadit @BarbaraJean me too! I would have been ok with a little more. @Roary47 that‘s how I felt and it really bothered me through the book- I had a hard time liking her parents because of it. @Butterfinger you have a generous and compassionate view and it‘s something I always need reminders to have. I just get angry too quickly. 7d
megnews @Chrissyreadit I‘m quick to anger to. Ugh. I agree about @butterfinger! 7d
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I Can Make This Promise | Christine Day
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BarbaraJean To me, the title represents Edie‘s desire to honor and remember both her grandmother and her heritage. I think the author chose it to highlight that part of the story, but also to communicate the idea that we can acknowledge sadness over what was lost, but also move forward in hope. 2w
Kenyazero @BarbaraJean I feel like that's a pretty good interpretation for the title 🤔 2w
sblbooks @BarbaraJean 👏Well said 2w
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megnews @BarbaraJean I love that explanation. I did feel sad that it was too late for Edie to meet her grandmother or even her great uncle. At least she has the box of memories as well as a place to go to to keep her promise to remember. 2w
TheBookHippie To carry on their stories, is the promise I think. 2w
Butterfinger Perfect @BarbaraJean did anyone else notice the foreshadowing? I may have just made it up in my head. While they were at the Native festival for the Fourth of July, Edie noticed an old woman with a sign. Something like "Bring Our Girls Home" I thought that was a very clever way to introduce readers to the shock of what happened to Edith and Edie's mom. 1w
megnews @Butterfinger I didn‘t! Great point. 1w
Chrissyreadit @Butterfinger great catch! @BarbaraJean yes! I like and agree with your interpretation! 7d
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I Can Make This Promise | Christine Day
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BarbaraJean So much of the story is about finding out where you‘re from—I liked the way the narrative was framed by that second question of where you‘re going, kind of moving from coming-of-age into thinking about how to take that knowledge into the future. 2w
sblbooks At the beginning of the story Edie didn't know much at all about her mother's side of the family. Through the novel she was able to learn about the history of her tribe and about her grandmother and mom's history now she will be able to connect more with her native community. She will also remember and honor her grandmother/ namesake. 2w
Roary47 I think that we have all went through this period of self discovery. There is a time where we want to understand where we are from. Who before us made a difference, what can we learn from their mistakes. After that discovery, who are we going to develop ourselves to be? When you have a rich culture on top of it like Edie you can really feel that connection to those who came before you. 2w
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TheBookHippie I liked this very much. It gives a sense of belonging -but also a responsibility to carry it on -all you‘ve learned. 2w
Butterfinger I thought that it was nice that Edie is an artist like her grandmother. Different media, but there is that connection. 1w
megnews @Butterfinger yes, I love this connection. My great grandfather was a baker in Charleston WV. He died long before my younger cousin came along but that cousin became a dessert chef. I find that connection so interesting. 1w
Chrissyreadit - it really bothered me that her parents did not integrate this knowledge and heritage in her awareness and understanding. That the concept of identity can be hidden and erased only supports the attempts to do exactly that. I wish this had been a more exploratory story of growing into her culture from the beginning and not as much of initial discovery @Butterfinger @sblbooks @TheBookHippie @IndoorDame @BarbaraJean @Roary47 @megnews 7d
IndoorDame @Chrissyreadit I felt that too. I wonder about the reason behind making her this sheltered suburban kid just beginning her journey towards awareness of her heritage. Is that actually a common scenario? Was it to underscore the idea of native children being forcibly removed from their parents and placed in white foster homes? Was it so non native children could relate better to the story as they discovered the good and the bad alongside Edie?… 7d
TheBookHippie @Chrissyreadit My great grandparents and grandparents did it with Judaism I imagine initially it‘s all fear. 7d
megnews Good point @TheBookHippie @Chrissyreadit @IndoorDame could it also be attempts at assimilation? Internalized racism? Deny the parts of self that they feel is what causes others to judge them? You‘re right that development of this part of the story kind of leaves the options wide open. 7d
IndoorDame @megnews I think you‘re spot on. Those things are exactly what I felt from the mom. Like in the scene at the movie theater, not only does Edie not already know that the movie is offensive, but her mom won‘t explain it to her in public in front of outsiders and risk causing a scene or being overheard. 7d
Chrissyreadit @megnews @IndoorDame I agree- but also think there is more of a movement now to reclaim and not be ashamed- I guess in my mind it‘s so contemporary I want to see activism. But that is not everyone‘s truth and perhaps the story reflects that some people are still held back by secrets. 6d
megnews @Chrissyreadit this is a great description. 6d
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megnews
I Can Make This Promise | Christine Day
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BarbaraJean I loved how she finally began to draw people by the end of the book. It was such a sweet symbol of inclusion, of letting people in, and a way for Edie to integrate new understandings of herself. She seemed to draw inspiration from the natural world, and I think that deepens when she‘s encouraged to include people in her landscapes. I think her art will be influenced by her Native identity more in the future, as she explores that part of herself. 2w
IndoorDame Her art seems to be a real reflection of her. At the end of the book as she became more self aware and assertive she was finally willing to risk drawing people even though she wasn‘t “good” at that. I agree with @BarbaraJean that her art will be influenced by her Native identity as she learns more about it and it becomes a stronger part of her identity. 2w
megnews @BarbaraJean @IndoorDame I agree with you both again. I loved how Edie‘s mom supported her art. And I loved when she was drawing at the cabin near the end and realized it was the other side of the lake. It was familiar yet different and like two sides of a coin as Edie realizes she has more than one side as well. I love her connection with nature through her art. 2w
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Roary47 I‘m not sure what more I could add. I agree with all of you that it reflected her life and growth. 2w
TheBookHippie I agree with everyone and I do think her art with help her with her identity and express all her emotions surrounding it. 2w
Butterfinger Megan, your description was beautiful. I laughed out loud when her father said she wasn't that good at landscapes when she started either. 1w
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megnews
I Can Make This Promise | Christine Day
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BarbaraJean Ugh, I couldn‘t stand Amelia! I think she ended up being significant in helping Edie grow into being more herself. Unfortunately Amelia did that in a negative way! I loved Serenity & how perceptive she was about Edie‘s feelings. Amelia was bossy & selfish about the Edith box—Serenity saw how personal & important it was to Edie. Libby felt like the typical mean girl & Roger was a nice inclusion as a potential friend connecting Edie to her heritage. 2w
megnews @BarbaraJean I agree on all points. I‘m glad Edie still has Serenity and it seems she will also have Roger who will be a great connection to her heritage as you said. 2w
sblbooks @BarbaraJean I totally agree. Amelia and Libby are just awful. Especially Amelia, who was supposed to be her friend, she just wanted to use Edith's story for her own benefit and didn't care about anyone else's feelings. I'm glad Edie still had Serenity she seemed like a true friend. I'm glad she met Rodger, someone who shares her heritage. 2w
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TheBookHippie @BarbaraJean that is summed up exactly right. I like Serenity as well. I also felt Rodger is an important person to have. 2w
Butterfinger I'm glad the author includes this. Not only do your appearances change during the mg years, but your friends change. It is so confusing and it hurts. Especially when your best friend chooses a bully over you. Chaya goes to middle school next year and I dread it. She has been listening with me which is why I am late. 1w
megnews @Butterfinger how did she like it? 1w
Chrissyreadit @Butterfinger @sblbooks @megnews @BarbaraJean @TheBookHippie @megnews I agree with what everyone has said. I also like how the author supports friends as part of identity formation, where learning about who you are and how you are different is so healthy and normal. Tammy I agree middle school is so hard- but also so much growth - I 7d
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I Can Make This Promise | Christine Day
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Time for #MGBuddyRead! Join when you can.

BarbaraJean There are so many layers to the meaning of a name, depending on why it was given—whether you‘re named after someone, or your parents liked the meaning or just liked the name itself. Family connections in a name feel like they carry a lot of weight—there‘s a bit of a responsibility to be like your namesake, to live up to their heritage. And names are so tied up in identity—nicknames, too! I hate being called Barb because it‘s never felt like ME. 2w
IndoorDame Names have a lot of power. They can tag you as being part of a certain community whether or not you actually are… I‘m a white woman with a middle eastern name, and as soon as I left NYC and moved to smaller places I started getting those pointed “where are you from?” questions… If nothing else it‘s given me a small bit of insight into what it‘s like for POC to live near me. 2w
sblbooks Names can tell you where someone's from, or what religion they are, such as biblical names. Like @BarbaraJean said if you're named after someone they have more mmeaning and a feeling of responsibility to live up to a certain standard. 2w
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megnews I agree that names are powerful @barbarajean and @IndoorDame I gave my children names that weren‘t on the popular lists because I wanted them to be different. The meaning of their names was also really important to me. I think it you‘re named after someone, as Edie is, it‘s natural to want to know about that person. 2w
Roary47 @megnews @BarbaraJean @IndoorDame @sblbooks I agree names have history, power, and can show you a lot about a person. I also named my kids unique names and researched their names meaning to benefit their futures “Happiness/Good Fortune” and “Protected by God”(2020 Baby). My youngest also has a female version of our late fathers that we miss dearly. 2w
TheBookHippie It‘s interesting -we just had this talk about last names. I use my birth name and people refuse to use it even though it‘s my legal name. The abusive nature of that is just sick. Names are hugely important I make this my number one with students -how to say it is extremely important. 2w
Butterfinger @BarbaraJean @TheBookHippie @IndoorDame @Roary47 @sblbooks forgive my tardiness. I agree with all that was said. I have always had a fascination with names. I wanted my first born to be named Shenandoah (my favorite movie), my husband wouldn't budge and I refused his choice Gwendolyn (goblin from Piers Anthony book). He finally let me have Abigail because it meant "My Father's Delight" and I fell in love with Chaya (it just looks like art) and I could imagine Jesus saying it. We are not Hebrew, but all four of us, except for Chaya, have names derived from the language 1w
Butterfinger So I agree that names portray our belief systems and our heritage. 1w
megnews @Butterfinger I love both your girls‘ names. Abigail was on my short list for both my girls too. 1w
Chrissyreadit @Butterfinger I have thought Chaya was a Hebrew name every time I read it- it is beautiful. 7d
Chrissyreadit I love this question and agree names are meaningful. I am the 9th generation named Christina but have such a strong disconnect with my mothers family I refused to name my daughter Christina- and my husband was very bothered by this. Instead we named her Brynne and her a middle name connected to two great grandparents- Rose and Etta a nod to his need for family connection. @BarbaraJean @TheBookHippie @Butterfinger @sblbooks @IndoorDame @roary47 7d
Chrissyreadit We picked my sons name based on a name I never heard as a teacher- Owen- and Atticus because my husband and I love To Kill A Mockingbird. I do regret not naming him Atticus Owen. Another thought reading this is how powerful that we all have name stories- it is a strong indicator for all of the power and meaning we give names. @Butterfinger @TheBookHippie @sblbooks @Roary47 @IndoorDame @BarbaraJean @megnews 7d
megnews @Chrissyreadit @Butterfinger I think it is a Hebrew name just not in the Bible. I love it too. Beautiful! As a family historian, I can understand how your husband was bothered by that but understand your reasoning too. 7d
IndoorDame @megnews @Chrissyreadit @Butterfinger Chaya comes from the Hebrew root word Chay which means life. It‘s a lovely name. 7d
Butterfinger @IndoorDame yes. And she matches her name very, very well. 😆 7d
Butterfinger I realized I mislead you @megnews @Chrissyreadit @IndoorDame when I said all, but Chaya was derived from Hebrew, I meant hers was the only one that WAS TRULY HEBREW, not a derivative. Like Jeremy, Tammy, and Abigail. Does that make more sense? Abigail is Biblical, but not the true Hebrew name. I named her Life because I had just suffered a miscarriage and it was what I needed. When Chaya was born, she had to go to a pediatric cardiologist, whose name was Chaya and she had emigrated from Tel Aviv. Although, we pronounce it with a k sound, not the nasal sound it should be. 7d
IndoorDame @Butterfinger oh, yes, that does make more sense. That‘s a very powerful story behind her name. I‘m sure it means a lot to Chaya that you put so much of yourself into naming her. 7d
Chrissyreadit @Butterfinger I love your story❤️ 7d
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Untitled | Unknown
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Not book related but had to share. I just signed up for 1 month of Disney+ for $1.99. Currently enjoying Disney shorts. Definitely have to watch Hamilton before the month is up.

ncsufoxes Wanda Vision is so good, all the Marvel series shows are good. My kids love The Mandalorian. Yes, Hamilton is the best. 2w
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Folks, I‘m behind again. My mom had a knee replacement last week and she‘s had some rough days. Been trying to help her and got behind on my reading. But here for those who are caught up is this week‘s #OtherSuns discussion post. What did you learn this week? What are your thoughts on arrival at their destinations? I will respond tomorrow when I finish.

MallenNC I hope your mom recovers well! I‘m a little behind too. 2w
megnews I highlighted so much in this section that I don‘t know where to start. I learned some California history. Among the group that founded LA were 40 black people. CA considered prohibiting black people from living in the state. Northern classrooms where all the children were born in the South! I loved her discussion on migration in general and how it applied to the Great Migration, that contrary to the lie, Black people who moved from the South 👇🏻 2w
megnews 👆🏻faced obstacles & were highly motivated to succeed. When I read this: “controlling the movements of Blacks by controlling the minds of whites,” I thought honestly there‘s still so many who think this way and try to control AA upward mobility. If only the recommendations of the Negro in Chicago report had been put in place everywhere: that white people would seek accurate information about Blacks as a basis for their judgements and that 👇🏻 2w
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megnews 👆🏻press treat black and white stories with the same standards and proportion. Sadly these recommendations could still be made today. 2w
Butterfinger Thinking of you and your mom. What stuck with me was the realty covenants to keep people separated. Oh my goodness. Which most definitely lead to projects and that kind of life. I know this is random, but since I was a little girl, I have been confused about this incident. My family was watching Good Times and the episode was about the family moving to Mississippi and how happy they were. I remember my daddy saying why would they want to come back? 2w
Butterfinger I just never understood that comment so on some level my father subconsciously knew about the great migration or he would not have used the word 'back'. Is there something to this? Is there a sociology study about urban families trying to migrate back? That is where my brain went during this read. Also, I have to read Jesse Owens's autobiography. 2w
megnews @Butterfinger from what the book said, it sounded like they were less likely to go back south than immigrants from other countries were to return to their homes. Regarding the realty covenants, I remember my great uncle in Columbia sc saying at dinner one night a group of neighbors was going to meet with a neighbor who was selling their house to Black people to convince him not to and I clearly remember him saying “why would they want to move 👇🏻 2w
megnews 👆🏻into our neighborhood?” I wish I knew what happened in that situation. This was the mid to late 80s and I‘ve never forgotten this. 2w
megnews @Butterfinger I am aware of families who‘ve sent a kid back down south with grandparents etc if they were starting to get in trouble up here. I think it‘s viewed as more rural and less likely to get in trouble. 2w
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Butterfinger I don‘t know about that, but I read a great book about the selling covenants build in to real estate, some legally have to be passed down from buyer to buyer forever, they are tied to the houses‘s deed and take a bunch of lawyer work to get removed no matter what the current owner wants or thinks. Such a crazy thing to me. Sone of these things I read and half can‘t imagine how crazy humans are.🙄. And yes, I want to read Jesse (JC)⤵️ 7d
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ Owens biography now too 7d
megnews @Riveted_Reader_Melissa it is crazy! That‘s a book on my tbr. Got to get to it! 6d
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The Edge of Lost | Kristina Mcmorris
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Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story | David Alexander Robertson
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Pickpick

This is listed as MG/YA and I‘ve seen a lot of recommendations for MG. Aspects of this book touch on sexual abuse in residential school in a way that would most likely go over a child‘s head. However, I would recommend an adult read this brief graphic memoir before introducing it to a child and be there to guide them as they read. Wouldn‘t recommend as read on your own for MG.
#NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

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Pickpick

Beautiful. Thankful to this introduction to Joy Harjo. I will definitely be reading more.
#BookSpin #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 2w
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1. With Narnia as an option, there‘s no place else I‘d rather travel! I‘d want to go during the tagged book or The Magician‘s Nephew.
2. That I can hug my daughter who‘ll be home from college in a couple weeks!

@sblbooks @Chrissyreadit would you like to play #WondrousWednesday

sblbooks I see somebody already had the same idea I did. Pages & Co Tilly in the Book Wonders that way you don't have to pick just one. Thankful for family and friends 2w
megnews @sblbooks that‘s a great idea!! I‘d enjoy that too. 2w
Eggs Thanks for joining in 📚🥳🎈 2w
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