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Hunchback of Notre-Dame
Hunchback of Notre-Dame | Victor Hugo
Here is the haunting drama of Quasimodo, the hunchback; Esmeralda, the gypsy dancer; and Claude Frollo, the priest tortured by his own damnation. Shaped by a profound sense of tragic irony, it is a work that gives full play to the author's brilliant imagination.
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VioletMoonBooks
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VioletMoonBooks
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Pickpick

A truly remarkable classic novel. At first it felt like it would take forever for me to read but as I read more and more of it, I found myself transported to 15th century France. I found myself so entrapped by the characters and their story lines l, that I couldn‘t put the book down. This was a very gratifying read. 🔔🇫🇷
#TheHunchbackOfNotreDame #VictorHugo #book #books #bookunion #bookunhaul #bookutopia #Classics #Fiction #HistoricalFiction 💖

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VioletMoonBooks
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VioletMoonBooks
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CrowCAH
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#RedRoseSeptember #PoorMisguidedFool

Quasimodo is a poor creature misguided by the fool teachings of Lord Frollo.

(Edited to change the bad guys name)

arlenefinnigan Frodo gets about doesn't he? (sorry, I'll get my coat) 2w
CrowCAH @arlenefinnigan I wrote the name wrong, it‘s Frollo! 🤦🏼‍♀️ I will fix. This is what happens when I haven‘t read the book and only have seen the Disney animated and sing along! 2w
Cinfhen Hahaha!! I saw the Disney animated film too !!! 2w
63 likes3 comments
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VioletMoonBooks
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Biverson12
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1. The Hunchback of Notre Dame because the translated version I have still has a lot of French in it and I don‘t know French!
2. The Devil‘s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen
3. Lots!
4. The Productivity Project by Chris Bailey - review coming soon ☺️
5. Anyone who‘s up for it!

Thanks @Eggs
#wondrouswednesday

Eggs Thanks for playing 🤗👏🏻📚💗 3w
25 likes1 comment
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OnlyYoo
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Pickpick

This book is one of the most beautiful books I‘ve ever read. I think I‘m going to do a full review on this so stay tuned 😄

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OnlyYoo

“As he grew up he had found naught around him but hatred. What wonder he should have caught it!” Just a random thought in my head that I wanted to share haha. But I‘ve been drawing a lot of parallels between Erik from The Phantom of the Opera and Quasimodo. Both were born deformed and have experienced human hate from birth. Hugo is right, no wonder they became cruel. It wasn‘t an inherent trait, rather learned behavior

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VioletMoonBooks
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Crazeedi Congrats! 1mo
sudi Congrats 🎉🎉🎉👏👏👏 1mo
Velvetfur Wow that's great! Congrats to you! 👏 1mo
brit91 🎉🎊🎉🎊🎉🎊🎉🎊 1mo
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VioletMoonBooks
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VioletMoonBooks
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jy0tiar0ra
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Pickpick

Quasimodo, the hero of one of the most moving love stories ever written. Better known as The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
It takes a wizard of words like Victor Hugo to turn such a person into one of the greatest lovers in literature.
Check out my review of the book at https://www.jyotiarora.com/hunchback-of-notre-dame/

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jy0tiar0ra
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Pickpick

The book truly tells a remarkable love story. And it is magnificent writing, startling, larger-than-life characters, and gripping passion and poignancy. A must-read for those who love great literature.

Full review on https://www.jyotiarora.com/hunchback-of-notre-dame/

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VioletMoonBooks
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Amabear
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Help!
Hey everyone! I haven‘t been on in so long- my apologies. I was severely sick in the hospital for a bit, and then I had like 6 clients in a row the last few months (I‘m a birth photographer) so Iv has very little time to post about my reading.
Alas, I need your help!!! Why does this say condensed from the book?? Am I not reading the full version?

callielafleur I'm sorry you've been ill! I would say that the condensed version is not the full version. 2mo
Amabear @callielafleur why would anyone do such a thing 😂 2mo
callielafleur Google says that the illustrations in that version are gorgeous, so enjoy it! It was apparently done in the 60s for Readers Digest. Goodreads says that the full version is 510 pages, how long is your version? 2mo
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Amabear @callielafleur 176! And it has no illustrations lol. 2mo
callielafleur 😂 2mo
DivineDiana Glad you‘re back! 2mo
Amiable Hope you‘re on the mend! 2mo
Amabear @Amiable thank you I am! 2mo
Amabear @DivineDiana thank you! 2mo
LibrarianRyan It means it has been shortened. they remove some scenes, or take out descriptions. The idea is that it makes it easier to read. 2mo
Eggs Welcome back 🤗 2mo
Amabear @LibrarianRyan well I dislike this idea. I feel like it‘s unfair to the author. I suppose I understand why but still. 2mo
Amabear @Eggs thank you! 2mo
LibrarianRyan @Amabear I completely agree. RD abridged books that never needed to be abridged. But then again I hate classics retold for kids. Do t even get me started on The Great American Classics series. 2mo
Amabear @LibrarianRyan oh really? Tell me 😂 I want to know all the things! 2mo
LibrarianRyan @Amabear I wrote it wrong. The great Illustrated classics are and old and still popular series for kids that dumbs down the classics. They also “clean” them up and take out controversial things. So kids think they have read all these classics and as they get older and actually have to study them, it can lead to difficulties in classrooms. 2mo
Clare-Dragonfly I had a similar thought and read the full, unabridged Les Miserables. But it had so much unnecessary description that I‘m sure an abridged version would have been better. My husband argued with me when I said the Battle of Waterloo was boring 😅 2mo
Amabear @LibrarianRyan oh yes I just read something on that. That would be frustrating (edited) 2mo
Amabear @Clare-Dragonfly lol! I haven‘t read that one. I tend to like long drawn out rants so we‘ll see how I feel about this one. 2mo
Clare-Dragonfly In that case, maybe you will! I hope you love it 😄 2mo
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VioletMoonBooks
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It is three hundred forty-eight years, six months, and nineteen days ago today that the citizens of Paris were awakened by the pealing of all the bells in the triple precincts of the City, the University, and the Town. 📚🔔
#TheHinchbackOfNotreDame #VictorHugo #firstline #openingline #book #books #funko #funkopop #popvinyl #FreddyFunko #bookz #bookzesty #bookzilla #bookzine #bookzone #bookxcess #bookcase #Classics #Fiction #HistoricalFiction 🖤🖤

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Readerann
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Pickpick

I was surprised to find the main focus of the book was the city of Paris and its architecture. Quasimodo and company seemed almost extraneous. I‘m glad I read it, but I liked Les Mis a lot more. It probably didn‘t help that I read a random freebie Kindle translation. #1001books

Daisey I remember enjoying Les Mis more as well. 2mo
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Graywacke
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Pickpick

First of all I had great fun reading this with the #hugonuts. Thanks @Lcsmcat !

But, it left me wondering what to make of this. Was it a really just dark fairytale? It‘s some kind of response to the French restoration, and light fun except, well... 🤷🏻‍♂️ Anyway, I enjoyed meeting all these famous characters and pondering medieval Paris, and I think I‘ve developed an attachment to a 🐐.

(To the other #hugonuts, sorry this comes in so late)

Lcsmcat I had a blast! I know Hugo was trying to draw attention to the state of the cathedral, and pressure people into restoring it. But otherwise I think he was just spinning a good yarn. 2mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat I was thinking more about the Bourbon Restoration after Napoleon than that kind of restoration, but that too, of course! It is a good story. 2mo
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BarbaraJean
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Pickpick

One more TBR classic chunkster conquered! I enjoyed this much more than Les Mis (but also admit that Les Mis is the better, more “serious” book). The melodrama & suspense, certain infuriating characters, and fewer essay-like digressions kept me turning pages to find out what happened next. Glad I read this with the #hugonuts! And now that I‘ve read the source material, I wonder why anyone thought this would be a good story to adapt for kids?!

Lcsmcat I‘ve wondered that myself! My kids loved the Disney version when they were small, but even with it playing so often in my house I don‘t remember how they handled the ending. 3mo
Daisey Very good point about the adaptation. I know I‘ve seen parts, but I don‘t think I ever watched the whole Disney movie. Also interesting because I remember enjoying Les Mis more overall, but I wonder what I would think if I read them closer together. 3mo
pppooraikul I read the book after watching the Disney adaptation (I don‘t like it much except for the music) so, I don‘t expect much. But this book completely blew my mind. 😍 The very first question that came to mind is exactly the same as yours! (edited) 3mo
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Daisey
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I finished the last two issues of the book this morning with breakfast. Overall I enjoyed the story, but the long section on architecture and the jumping perspectives when I was most interested in staying with a certain character hold me back from considering it great. The tragedy seems realistic and appropriate for the story, but the little bits of humor and Djali 🐐 are still some of my favorite aspects.

#Hugonuts #SerialReader #1001books

Daisey @Lcsmcat Thanks so much for hosting the readalong. The group posts and discussion definitely helped me get more from this classic read. 3mo
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jewright
Pickpick

There was just that one slow section about the architecture. I even liked the part about the cathedral itself, but it needed to stop there and not continue for chapters. Overall, though, I really enjoyed the book, and I loved reading it with #hugonuts.

Graywacke It was really fun the read together! 3mo
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jewright
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About Phoebus‘s end...
Did Hugo marry? #hugonuts

Lcsmcat Yes, he was married for 46 years to Adèle Foucher. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat apparently there was some tension in the marriage too...even at the stage when he wrote this. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke One would think so, from his statement about Phoebus, even if one had no other evidence. 😀 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat well... yeah... 🙂 3mo
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Lcsmcat
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame | Victor Hugo, Frederic Shoberl
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Final discussion starters of the book. La Esmeralda, in danger, rescued, in danger, rescued ad infinitum. Did it create real suspense for you? Was the ending Hugo gave her and Quasimodo the happiest he could imagine for them, given the era? Did Quasimodo get revenge on Frollo, or did the cathedral wreak her own revenge? Was it enough for you? What about Phoebus? Did he get off free? Final thoughts on the book? #hugonuts

TheBookHippie I now want to watch the Disney kid version to see what they did!!! 3mo
TheBookHippie I love how Esmeralda choose death over sleeping with Frollo. I think she tried. I had to remind myself while reading that she was 16 and how actually strong she was especially in that time. I think the ending is real. Probably not popular. I think she was truly loved by Quasimodo. What happened to the goat??? Did I miss that? I enjoyed it. Much more than I anticipated. How very sad that this was a lot of women‘s fate. Falsely accused. Witchcraft 3mo
TheBookHippie Cont .... because of intelligence or having ones own mind. Refusal of advances so she was threatened with her life. Happens still. 3mo
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tournevis Hugo wanted to remind people of the Vanitas. Only buildings can last. People are crap and they die. So in the end, yes, the cathedral won and it remains. As for Esmeralda, she had sex, so of course she had to die. And, I do not remember what happens to the goat either. 3mo
Lcsmcat @TheBookHippie @tournevis Gringoire escapes with Djali. He can only save one, and he chooses the goat. 3mo
tournevis @Lcsmcat The goat wins! 🐐 3mo
TheBookHippie @Lcsmcat 🤣🤣 oye. I missed that. I was going to go reread since I was reading while I was drugged from my awful allergy steroids that are not my friend !! 3mo
janeycanuck I fell so far behind on this!! I‘m going to revisit soon and am looking forward to coming back and reading the discussion as I finish each week‘s reading. Thanks for hosting, @Lcsmcat 3mo
jewright Quasimodo and the cathedral work together to kill Frollo. Thank goodness. The cruelest part is that the mother lost her daughter right after she found her. I could have just screamed with Esmeralda yelling for Phoebus at the last minute, but she was only 16. We‘re all stupid about men at that point. Gringoire disappointed me in choosing the goat. Quasimodo is the only one who had Esmerelda‘s best interests at heart. 3mo
BarbaraJean I was in suspense over Esmeralda the whole way—and I rolled my eyes when she called out to Phoebus. 🤦🏻‍♀️ I don‘t know about Hugo giving Esmeralda & Quasimodo the happiest ending possible given the era—I could have seen them contentedly living in Notre Dame for the rest of their days! Hugo was going for pathos & tragedy, and he got it. All the near-rescues, the short-lived mother-daughter reunion... definitely constructed for maximum heartbreak. 3mo
BarbaraJean Except for Gringoire. I think he got his happiest ending! 💜🐐 3mo
BarbaraJean I like the idea of the cathedral wreaking its own revenge—especially since that Frollo scene is so drawn out, like the cathedral is keeping him from saving himself. I like to think of the cathedral and Quasimodo as partnering together in protecting the innocent and in bringing justice, though imperfectly. 3mo
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean And, while Q pushed him, it says that he was close enough to help him, which means he was also close enough to give him a final push, but he didn‘t. 3mo
Graywacke Sorry, I can‘t believe he killed her off after all that! That Gringoire chose the 🐐 is really funny though. There is a lot of humor for such a dark end. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I know! Why couldn‘t she keep quiet and escape! And I‘m glad you appreciated the humor too. I think the classics are often far more entertaining than we give them credit for. 3mo
BookwormAHN I love that Gringoire chose Djali and got away. I would have been really upset if the goat would have been hanged. I think the ending was rather romantic or as romantic as Quasimodo was going to get. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat yes, that‘s something I‘m coming to learn, the humor. Hugo seemed to ooze happy confidence. Which is odd, since my afterword has him writing locked in a room with a head-to-toe sweater that he couldn‘t wear outside the house - to prevent him from distractions.. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke That‘s hilarious! 3mo
Lcsmcat @BookwormAHN It‘s certainly the way they played it in the musical. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=M2OnxTL0VSg But I prefer living to dying for love. 😆 I am glad the goat was saved, but Gringoire, 🤷🏻‍♀️ 3mo
Graywacke @BookwormAHN @Lcsmcat Seems we all love the goat. 16 yr gets hanged. Sad and unfortunate and dramatic. (Romantic?) Goat gets hung - not acceptable!! Gringoire makes an odd anti-hero. (edited) 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I see him more as a fool than an anti-hero. He‘s just hapless. But the goat was the only one who (if you play by the rules of the world Hugo set up) is totally innocent. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat Gringoire was such a disappointment. But that‘s his role. He reminds me of Rincewind in discworld, the hapless wizard. He is a fool. The philosophers were big in the 18th century, but not so much for Hugo. He‘s attacking them. But, G is also a hero because he saved the goat. And, as a dead goat is a barbaric book, he saves the book. So, that‘s where I get anti-hero. (edited) 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat I started going through your questions one by one. No quick answers. 🙂 Would take me six posts - one for each question. Maybe I‘ll scatter them?? 3mo
Graywacke Q1 suspense: For me, yes there was some suspense. But it always had a fairytale feel for me, so it was more of a curiosity than a worried suspense. But I read the last 50 pages very quickly... 3mo
Graywacke Q2 : happiest ending: The ending was maybe ok for Quasimodo because he sort of got his girl, but certainly not for Esmeralda. Quasimodo was just another unwanted courter (who couldn‘t handle no.) the only happy ending for Esmeralda would have been with her mom in Rheims. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I respectfully disagree that Quasimodo couldn‘t handle no. He made sure to stay away when she was awake, bringing her food without expecting anything from her. What I mean by “happiest ending possible” was that neither a gypsy nor a disfigured person was valued enough in that time to be considered fully human. Hugo couldn‘t have them living happily ever after - no one would buy it. So he did what he could and focused on the after life. (edited) 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat I don‘t think we‘re disagreeing. But it‘s good thing to have different perspectives. What I‘m thinking is “no” should mean move on. Not, watch me while I sleep and do other things and obsess over me. He was a mixture of stalker and protective angel. But, in no way does Esmeralda end up with him by choice. She was no angel, as we slowly learn. She was focused on the visual, and couldn‘t appreciate Q or see through Ph. But... 3mo
Graywacke But Hugo did not share my perspective. For him, having them end up together in death was a kind of romance. His version of beauty and the beast. So, I do agree with you, it‘s the only possible ending where they end up together. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I agree that watching you sleep is not welcome behavior. I just cut old authors more slack than I do currently living human males. 😂 And totally agree that Esmeralda didn‘t get a happy ending. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat 🙂view the author from their times and so on...he did capture the imagination of a nation. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Ang got a cathedral rebuilt. 3mo
Daisey I just finished this morning, so adding my thoughts. @tournevis @BarbaraJean @Graywacke The goat wins! I know it sounds harsh, but I really am happy the goat escaped. I was pretty sure the others would not get a truly happy ending and I loved the humor with the goat, so it seems right. 🐐 💕 3mo
Daisey I tried to keep some hope for Esmeralda, but I feel this tragic end was realistic to the story. She gave up her chance when she still thought Phoebus might care for her at all and called to him. Phoebus got exactly what I expected, and as for Frollo, that ending was perfect! I feel the most for Quasimodo, and I think he really was doing his best to respect Esmeralda's wishes while still protecting her as much as possible. 3mo
Graywacke @Daisey Djali was a clear favorite character. 🐐 ❤️ 3mo
Graywacke Q3 Did Quasimodo get revenge on Frollo, or did the cathedral wreak her own revenge? When I think about this too much it seems these two used each other, Quasimodo possessed by and at the same time master of the silent building. (An epicurean/stoic bond?) Which leaves me to wonder who else did the building possess? Claude? Jehan? Esmeralda? 🐐? Certainly it seemed to pass judgment. I‘m going with both. 3mo
Graywacke Q4 Was the revenge enough for me? No! Claude never understood how much he was his own and everyone else‘s problem. If he had come to that realization, I would happier. But that wasn‘t really possible. (He did have time to realize he‘d crossed Quasimodo‘s line of justice. That was a little satisfying.) 3mo
Graywacke Q5: What about Pheobus? Pheobus was for me an extra. A teen heartthrob and otherwise a cipher (a lot like the Paris of the Iliad...) 3mo
Graywacke Oh, did get off free? Yes! If his marriage goes bad (or not) he‘ll just find the next girl... 3mo
Graywacke Q6 final thoughts: Most of the book felt like a Middle East fairy tale - Esmeralda even had the outfit. Djali gave a pastoral feel. Claude was the evil sorcerer, certainly not Christian. But then the end has so much arbitrary death. It becomes a horror show, toying with medieval hard life myths but really an expression about the Revolution and a protest on the ridiculousness of France returning to monarchy. Also... 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke It did have a fairy tale feel - especially with the Truands being identified as the king of this or the king of that. 3mo
Graywacke Also, no one liked anyone else ever. Everyone was focused on themselves and only thought of other people kindly if they wanted to possess them, like an acquisition. Also, Jehan was a terrible Odysseus (I think Hugo meant that) and failed to slay his Polyphemus. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat The Truands were entertaining. Oh right - Prince of Egypt or whatnot!! Another middle east touch 3mo
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jenniferw88
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BarbaraJean
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“What can you have to attach you so strongly to life?”
“Ah, a thousand reasons...the air—the sky—the morning—the evening—the moonlight...the fine architecture of Paris to study...more than I can tell. Anaxagoras used to say he had come into the world to admire the sun. And then I have the felicity of passing the whole of my days, from morning to night, with a man of genius—no other than I myself—and that‘s very agreeable.”

😂 #hugonuts

Lcsmcat I love this section! 3mo
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Lcsmcat
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Just starting Book 10, and look @Graywacke Hugo knew what you were thinking about Gringoire. 😀 #hugonuts

Graywacke 🤣 🤣 🤣 3mo
Graywacke Thank you. You‘re timing is perfect. 🙂 3mo
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Daisey
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I realized this morning that I was a book behind schedule. Luckily, it was a rainy Saturday and Book 9 was short enough I could fit it all in today.

Since Gringoire has failed to appear recently and Quasimodo is finally demonstrating his compassionate side, my favorite characters are currently Quasimodo & Djali (the goat deserves more words).

Also this quote caught my attention as an interesting description of love.

#Hugonuts #SerialReader

Daisey “Love is like a tree; it sprouts forth of itself, sends its roots out deeply through our whole being, and often continues to flourish greenly over a heart in ruins.

And the inexplicable point about it is that the more blind is this passion, the more tenacious it is. It is never more solid than when it has no reason in it.”
3mo
Lcsmcat I noted that quote too, along with this one: “It was two extremes of wretchedness, of nature and of society, meeting and helping each other.” 3mo
tournevis "The goat deserves more words." ? 3mo
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tpixie @Daisey that‘s an awesome quote! 3mo
tpixie @Lcsmcat another great quote! 3mo
tpixie @tournevis lol a 3rd great quote! Lol 😂 3mo
Daisey @Lcsmcat That one caused me to pause in my reading as well. 3mo
Daisey @tournevis It‘s so true! I‘m constantly thinking I want to hear more details about the goat‘s escapades. 🐐 3mo
TheDoctor What app/program do you use for tracking the percentage of books read? 3mo
Daisey @TheDoctor This is a screenshot from Serial Reader, an app that divides classics into approximately 10-15 minute reading sections daily. It‘s free just to read daily or you can pay to read ahead and have notes, etc. After each section read it gives you a little congratulatory message and tracks your percentage complete. 3mo
TheDoctor Thank you for a long, comprehensive answer! I think I will try it out. 3mo
JazzFeathers 😍 3mo
tournevis @Daisey I don't disagree, at all, but of all the commentaries I have ever seen about Notre-Dame-de-Paris, "The goat needs more words" is a first for me. ??? 3mo
tournevis @tpixie 🤣🤣🤣 3mo
BarbaraJean You‘re not alone... I just discovered that Gringoire apparently misses Djali more than Esmeralda: “He did not even feel tempted to go and see her there. He sometimes thought of the little goat, and that was all.” 💜🐐 3mo
Daisey @BarbaraJean I just read that today as well. Really, Djali is often my favorite part! 💕 🐐 3mo
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Lcsmcat
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame | Victor Hugo, Frederic Shoberl
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Good morning #hugonuts! Books 8 and 9 are more action packed than previous books, but still give us lots to think about . Frollo- over-the-top, or accurate portrayal of a stalker/abuser? Quasimodo- after seeing the “monster” side of his personality earlier, how do you feel about this sad, gentle side? And I know she‘s naive, but really Esmeralda? You still think Phoebus hung the moon?

Graywacke They‘re maybe all over the top. 🙂 I thought book viii was terrific. Had trouble with some of the randomness of book ix. 3mo
BookwormAHN I think they are all overly dramatic, but Esmeralda drives me nuts. 3mo
tournevis This is the point in the book where I want to yell at Hugo to get to the point already, despite knowing he has *12012* pages of exposition yet to explain to me just how bad a capital sin lust is. But this is me as someone who's read it before. There is more action in the upcoming pages though. 3mo
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jewright I feel sorry for Quasimodo. He needs help with communication, counseling, and social services. No one has ever given him a chance. I just want to smack Esmerelda. Phoebus is not worth her time. And I think Hugo has a foot fetish. I‘m never recommending this book to anyone who hates feet. Overall though, this part of the book was great. I read it all at once because I wanted to know what happened next. 3mo
Graywacke @BookwormAHN Esmeralda is so frustrating. 3mo
Graywacke @tournevis That was me in book iii. (But it‘s my first time reading) (sorry all, hit send instead of the autofill) (edited) 3mo
BarbaraJean @jewright Now I really want to read those imaginary deleted chapters—“Social Services Visits Notre Dame” and “The Frollo Family Goes to Therapy.” 3mo
BarbaraJean I agree with @Graywacke and @BookwormAHN that they‘re all over the top! But some of Claude‘s patterns of thought struck me as a fairly accurate portrayal of an incel (though ironically it was not involuntary for him!). The blaming and shaming he does seem eerily similar to present day slut-shaming and “she was asking for it” justifications—blaming women for inciting and then not accommodating male lust. 3mo
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean You‘ll have to write those chapters! 😀 3mo
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean I found it way too accurate. The whole “if I can‘t have you no one can” is so chilling, and yet we hear it from domestic abusers all the time. Frollo just wasn‘t very good at the murder part where Phoebus was concerned. 3mo
tournevis @BarbaraJean @jewright *snort snort snort* 3mo
Graywacke @jewright funny! I wanted to smack Esmeralda too. She‘s suddenly such a ... teenager. 3mo
Graywacke @BarbaraJean @BookwormAHN @Lcsmcat - incel - ew. Scary how accurate. Leaves me wondering how sympathetic Hugo was vs how much is tongue-and-cheek. It‘s like Claude has no idea he‘s the cause. (edited) 3mo
Graywacke Random thoughts: (1) the court room scene was very entertaining, especially the description of the prosecutor‘s use of Latin. (2) We haven‘t heard Quasimodo really talk before this. I thought it was kind of interesting and unexpected. Had me thinking of Frankenstein‘s monster. (3) Hugo goes psychological. I thought Esmeralda‘s perspective of in prison was terrifically done. And there‘s Claude‘s fever - curious at least. 3mo
Graywacke (4) why does no one try to visit Esmeralda in sanctuary? Not even Gringoire... 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I thought the prison scene and Frollo‘s crazed running from Paris were both viscerally written. I‘m not sure about the rules of Sanctuary, but since Quasimodo told her to stay in the room during the day but told her she was free to move about the cathedral at night, I assumed it wasn‘t fool-proof. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat I thought Gringoire should have a least checked. It‘s not like he doesn‘t know the place... 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke But that would imply that he cared about someone other than himself. And Quasimodo seems to be the only character capable of that. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat hmm. Wow, this is true. Just obsessions (which are essentially self-centered) and indifference. Hadn‘t noticed. 3mo
Daisey @BookwormAHN I'm finding Esmeralda incredibly frustrating as well. I keep thinking that growing up as she has she should be more aware which makes it even worse! 3mo
Daisey @Graywacke I had this same question about Gringoire. I kept expecting him to show up through Book IX. 3mo
Daisey @BarbaraJean I so want to see these chapters now that you've named them! 3mo
Daisey I do like finally seeing this side of Quasimodo, although it's also incredibly sad to consider how he thinks of himself and others. As this is the first time I've read the book, that gentle persona is what I was kind of expecting and it seemed to be a long time coming. 3mo
Lcsmcat I like how we‘re treating these 15th century characters as if they lived now. Maybe one of us needs to do an update, kind of like the Hogarth Shakespeare series. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat started to think about this and how naturally the cathedral would morph into a virtual thing....and then Ready Player One came to mind - cathedral is virtual world, Esmeralda is Artemis, the bad guy is the Archdeacon, Hunchback would be...hmm... H? (Guess this doesn‘t make sense of you haven‘t read the book or seen the movie) I guess that‘s a scifi, not real world current setting. Anyway, was fun to think through. 3mo
43 likes26 comments
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Graywacke
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Ok Vic, what next disturbing fetish will you take out on poor Esmeralda? Seriously. (I‘m reading in an empty conference room while my son has Bar Mitzvah training...) #hugonuts

tournevis 😂😂😂😂 3mo
Lcsmcat If he wanted to make a twisted character, he succeeded with Frollo! 3mo
Graywacke @tournevis no, seriously!! 🙂 3mo
See All 9 Comments
Graywacke @Lcsmcat lasciate ogni speranza indeed. But Frollo is a terrifically quirky twisted character. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat or maybe he‘s just a common crazed stalker... 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Can we go with both?! 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat yes, well maybe. I‘m leaning towards the second one. 3mo
jewright I think Hugo must have had a foot fetish. 3mo
Graywacke @jewright yeah, I think he did too... 3mo
55 likes9 comments
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Lcsmcat
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Fleur de Lys‘ Mother. 🤷🏻‍♀️ We‘renearing the finish line #hugonuts. I can‘t wait for this weekend‘s discussion.

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LibrarianRyan
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Isn‘t there a #buddyread of this going on right now. Can‘t stand the Disney movie but the pop is awesome.

Anyone else think this looks like a young Chris Evans or maybe Brandon Frazier in the Mummy years?

Bookjunkie57 Definitely Brenden Fraiser 😂😂 3mo
Gissy 😍 3mo
mydearwatson I love the Disney movie 😆. I later decided to read the book, and I adore that, too. 3mo
44 likes3 comments
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Rachbb3
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#bookhaul 👌😀

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jewright
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Love this bit of humor here. #hugonuts

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BookwormAHN
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Mehso-so

This book was really hard to get into. I ended up switching to the audio book about a quarter of the way in. The French pronunciations and the architecture lessons were killing me. The story itself was okay. Disney really got it wrong and the horror movies weren't any better. I'm glad I read it even though I didn't particularly care for it 🐐
#HugoNuts @Lcsmcat
9th book for #BFC #bookfitnesschallenge @wanderinglynn

wanderinglynn Sorry it was kind of a dud for you. But wayto go on your book goal! 🙌🏻 3mo
80 likes1 comment
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Daisey
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I‘m appreciating the action of this section of the story and am curious to keep reading. However, as others have mentioned, I am finding no redeeming qualities in the younger brother.

I read a few more pages in the field today while helping my uncle haul big round bales. Although our fields near the river are still under water, we‘ve got a field of corn and hay to put up in the hills.

#Hugonuts #SerialReader #BooksontheFarm

janeycanuck I‘m so behind in this! I hope I can catch up before the discussion is over!! 3mo
Daisey @janeycanuck I'm really surprised I haven't fallen behind. I tend to read it in stages, several pages at once and then stalling for a bit. Good luck! 3mo
70 likes2 comments
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Daisey
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I really enjoy these descriptive sections about the ringing of the bells. The joy and the personality of the bells is such a fascinating aspect of this story.

#Hugonuts #SerialReader

Lcsmcat I agree! 3mo
56 likes1 comment
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Lcsmcat
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame | Victor Hugo, Frederic Shoberl
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Book Six brought us back to human characters, and introduced (or fleshed out) some new ones. For Quasimodo justice is not blind, but deaf. Did Hugo‘s humor come through for you in that scene, or was it just sad? What about La Sachette/Paquette/La Chantefleurie? Does her reaction to La Esmeralda make sense? Is she holy or mad, removing herself from the world and revering the pink baby shoe? Other thoughts on Book 6?

tournevis I've always been frustrated by this section. However, it's one where Hugo's thesis about all people being mostly bad is rather blatant. I could have done without female hysteria as well. It moves the plot along, so there's that. 3mo
Graywacke I really enjoyed this section. I felt a viewer thinking about the story, and the performance of a story. Earlier, by introducing gypsy Esmerelda and the criminals, he set up a touch of a fairytale atmosphere. I was thinking I should read 1001 nights. Here he continues with Quasimodo in the cruel world mixed with all these humorous aspects. As a reader, I‘m watching a storyteller. The ladies were part of that storytelling. 3mo
Graywacke Quasi-spoiler - really a question. But might reveal something, or might be way off base. Is it safe to assume Esmerelda is that stolen child, Quasimodo the exchanged child and this section brings them all together? Chantefleurie at the end is sending curses on her own daughter? 3mo
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TheBookHippie @tournevis oh I so agree with you!!!!!! And it‘s how I try not to feel lately!!! Ugh (edited) 3mo
TheBookHippie @Graywacke I think so. 3mo
suvata @Graywacke I like that theory. I have to re-read that section with a more critical eye. 3mo
TheBookHippie I did enjoy reading this section and I understood it all! Bonus. I‘m glad we‘re reading this I‘m really starting to click with it! 3mo
Daisey @Graywacke This is what I was thinking as I read it. 3mo
jewright I could see the humor in a deaf judge, but overall, this whole section made me so sad. The whipping was brutal even though Quasimodo did something terrible. I don‘t think the mother‘s grief is exaggerated at all. I can‘t even imagine what I would do if one of my kids disappeared. (edited) 3mo
jewright @Graywacke This is my first reading, but I thought this too. 3mo
Graywacke @TheBookHippie I felt the same. I‘m finally just enjoying. (It‘s Hugo. So he‘ll still throw me on the next discursive essay.) @suvata - yeah, gets you thinking and wondering what else is going on. 3mo
tournevis @TheBookHippie Hugo, for all his being a commercial writer, had messages! He thought himself a revealer of truths and a public intellectual. His contemporary novels are essential for studying the period, when you peel off ideologies first. Now, @Graywacke is asking very pointed questions that everyone should keep in mind, but not entirely for the obvious. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke You read carefully! Yes, you are correct. 3mo
Daisey I enjoyed this section more than the previous since we got back to characters again. I got the humor in the deaf justice, but it was mostly just frustrating to read. 3mo
Lcsmcat @TheBookHippie I‘m glad! Sometimes I think calling a book a classic makes people afraid to read it. But after all, it was written to be enjoyed. 3mo
Lcsmcat @jewright @Daisy I wonder if Hugo was trying to make his point about injustice in a way that was palatable enough to those in power that they wouldn‘t just shut down and stop paying attention. 3mo
Graywacke @jewright Poor Quasimodo. He had no idea what was coming. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat and everyone else 🙂 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat @jewright @Daisy @tournevis - Wondering about his social agenda too. 3mo
BookwormAHN I thought the scene with the judge was more frustrating than humorous but I can see how a stolen child could drive someone to lock themselves away. Also does anyone else think Esmeralda seems a little too innocent/naive at times? 3mo
BarbaraJean With the lack of philosophizing, I was able to just immerse myself in the story & really enjoyed it! In the courtroom, I appreciated the social commentary implied by a deaf judge vs. a deaf plaintiff, but the humor fell flat for me due to the outcome. I can‘t stand little brother Frollo & his joking about others‘ misfortune! The pillory scene was brutal—a parallel to current broken justice systems & scandal-hungry public feeding off others‘ pain. 3mo
BarbaraJean @Lcsmcat I like the idea that Hugo was trying to use humor in the courtroom scene to draw people in and make his point more palatable. It didn‘t really work for me (tone whiplash?!) but perhaps it would have hit differently for his audience? 3mo
BarbaraJean @Graywacke I have to say, I thought your “Quasi-spoiler” was going to be about Quasi...modo.🤣 And I like that theory and how it brings it all together. It fits with all the other coincidences of that scene! I felt La Sachette was a little over the top. I don‘t want to diminish a mother‘s grief—having your child stolen would be horrific—but the veneration of the shoe was a bit much for me! And how sad to nurture pain and bitterness for so long. 3mo
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean Frollo the younger annoys me too. He has no redeeming features that I can see. 3mo
Lcsmcat @BookwormAHN I do think it would be difficult to lead the life she led and stay that innocent. 3mo
Graywacke @BookwormAHN @BarbaraJean @Lcsmcat On Esmerelda is too innocent and ChanteFleurie too much - makes me think more about the fairytale elements. 3mo
Graywacke @BarbaraJean there was a tiny bit of Quasimodo in my quasi-spoiler...☺️ 3mo
36 likes27 comments
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Daisey
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Time for a little front porch reading with my iced coffee. I‘m starting book 6 today and am ready to get back to some characters again.

#Hugonuts #SerialReader

Catt This pic looks much better than the last! I hope things are drying out there! By the way, I‘m new to Litsy and starting to figure it out. Where does one find these book reading groups like #hugonuts? Thanks! 3mo
JazzFeathers I'm on the train home. It's as hot as Mount Doom today and you shouldn't have mention ice coffee 😭😭😭 3mo
Daisey @Catt It‘s not better. I‘m staying at my sister‘s a few miles from the flooding and was reading on her porch this morning. This afternoon I‘m back on the water. As for readalongs, it‘s mostly just a matter of seeing them in the posts you follow or catching one for a book you look up. Do you follow @LitsyHappenings? It often posts about upcoming events, swaps, readalongs. (edited) 3mo
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Daisey @JazzFeathers Sorry! If it helps, I‘m now headed out in the sun to help fill and lay more sandbags ☀️ 💪 3mo
Catt Thank you for the info and sorry you are still in deep water! Sending dry wishes! 3mo
Daisey @Catt Thanks for the positive thoughts! Feel free to ask questions anytime!! 3mo
JazzFeathers @Daisey 😂😂😂 Or maybe 😨😨😨 3mo
jewright I love the cup! 3mo
Daisey @jewright It‘s from Jessie, and it‘s fantastic! 3mo
Lcsmcat And maybe meet some new ones. 😉 3mo
49 likes10 comments
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suvata
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Pickpick

Litsy Buddy Read #HugoNuts — This book was so intense I just had to read ahead. Although I finished way before the deadline I still plan on participating in the Litsy conversation.

I first read this book in 1988. After re-reading it in 2019 I truly believe that I was not mature enough to understand it fully the first time. Heck, I could read it again in years from now and find other truth and brilliance within its pages.

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suvata
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Making progress! #HugoNuts

TheBookHippie Me too!!!! 3mo
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Lcsmcat
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“Before printing, the Reformation would just have been a schism; printing made it a revolution.” Luther came later than our friend Frollo, so perhaps he was more of a sorcerer/alchemist than he wanted people to know. 😆 All joking aside, what do you make of Hugo‘s assertion? Any modern parallels you can think of? The Arab Spring and social media, for instance? #hugonuts

GingerAntics Donald Trump and social media springs instantly to mind. That never would have been a serious thing, it never would have taken off (he never got that much attention for anything) before social media. 4mo
tournevis Hugo's take on the Reformation echoes many historians of his time and is not exactly wrong. Of course, the Reformation was a confluence, made of many thinkers and many movements, Luther being only one of them and thebest known because the most denounced by the Roman Catholic Church. The use of the printing press by Luther and his movement allowed for greater dissemination of his ideas than Zwingli's or Calvin's, for example. 4mo
Lcsmcat @tournevis True, and Calvin and Zwingli prepared the way. Luther‘s ideas weren‘t as shocking because people had heard similar ideas before. The printing press loosened the control of the powerful (in this case the Church) in the same way the internet loosens the control of governments or corporations today. 4mo
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tournevis @Lcsmcat I wouldn't say 'the same way' exactly, but there are parallels. I have to add that printing was important for the Reformation but it's not what made the populace convert. The corruption in the RCC made a lot a people rather willing to give it a try. 4mo
Graywacke @tournevis @Lcsmcat @GingerAntics Hugo makes sense to me here, although these above comments have me wondering and trying not to oversimplify. I think technology always changes the message. Social media revolutions - hmm, all I think of is the poison of misinformation. Maybe I‘m in a bad mood. Seems like the informed revolution hasn‘t happened yet. Even if the Reformation needed the printing press, it was just another manipulate the info game. 4mo
GingerAntics @Graywacke that sounds about right. Is there a revolution that isn‘t just a new manipulation of information? They say history is written by the winners. That sounds to me like nothing but manipulation of facts. 🤷🏼‍♀️ I would love to see an informed revolution where we can stop acting like some made up “other” is the enemy and somehow by not being “other” we‘re all clearly right. 🤷🏼‍♀️ That‘s probably just wishful thinking, though. 4mo
tournevis @Graywacke @GingerAntics @Lcsmcat I think you would enjoy reading tagged, in the original English (only the Italian is in the database for some reason). 4mo
Lcsmcat @tournevis That does look interesting! I‘d definitely have to find it in English though. My Italian never got beyond first year grammar and musical terminology. 😀 4mo
tournevis @Lcsmcat Gutenberg The Geek is the title in English, by Jeff Jarvis. @Graywacke @GingerAntics 4mo
Graywacke @GingerAntics politics and mythology... 😐 4mo
Graywacke @tournevis Thanks! Noting. Looks terrific. 4mo
BarbaraJean @GingerAntics @Graywacke Social media springs to mind for me as well—specifically #BlackLivesMatter and #MeToo, which were born in and garnered a lot of momentum/awareness through social media because of how quickly the message can spread & grow. But I also think the revolution part hasn‘t materialized because of the immediacy—for every #MeToo there‘s someone quickly yelling “Fake News.” Maybe the printing press allowed for more stable dissention? 4mo
GingerAntics @BarbaraJean perhaps it‘s less that the immediacy is an issue, but more that they are competing revolutions. The one is about equality, equanimity, and empowerment while the other is about recapturing and maintaining the status quo of 50+ years ago. They are in direct opposition, so a step forward for one is a step back for the other, so every step on either side must be answered by a step by the other side. 4mo
GingerAntics @BarbaraJean Although it does have the added bonus of being a really quick way to get to fhe heart of a person. You know a lot about a person, fundamentally, by knowing which revolution they‘re a part of. (edited) 4mo
Graywacke @GingerAntics @BarbaraJean I‘m stumbling through Plutarch‘s Lives, which happens to cover the end of the Roman Republic. I‘m also stumbling through the abolition battles through the life of Frederick Douglass. It‘s odd to see the parallels today in both. I think you‘re right, @GingerAntics that there are different and contradictory changes (are they revolutions?) 4mo
Graywacke @GingerAntics @BarbaraJean I‘m at the point where I‘m about to yap too much. But I think these social movements are a natural steps in our current culture, but the tension they create, the fear of change, leaves a place to be manipulated. 4mo
GingerAntics @Graywacke I completely agree about the place left open for manipulation. I think that‘s a big reason we‘ve (Americans) ended up in our current situation with our current president. It was and is all manipulation for personal power. 4mo
TheBookHippie @GingerAntics exactly how we got here. @Graywacke It always amazes me when as now things are brought to light as a “new fight or a new revolution” or “a threat to our rights”..30 years in social justice I can tell you the fight is exactly the same, and our rights are no more threatened than before. There is currently a magnifying glass put up to the issues and permission for the far extremist to have no worry of prosecution. The hate is the same. 3mo
TheBookHippie @GingerAntics @Graywacke what bothers me more isn‘t the actual bafoon in office ...it‘s the people willing to sell their very soul for antiabortion and all these folks calling themselves Jesus followers. The people had they not been this divided or hateful would not be swayed by one person . The fractures were there. 3mo
TheBookHippie Your quote made me think of Sophie Scholl and the white rose and what publishing that little piece of resistance did. 3mo
Graywacke @TheBookHippie interesting, your perspective on social justice. I feel like core cultures have shifted quietly during those 30 years in positive ways - with some economic drive. But then, I haven‘t lived in Alabama (or Georgia, or ... ) As for the rest, in respect of Litsy i‘ll hold my peace, spare you all my quirky philosophies and just say I don‘t like the shitgibbon or anything that likes, is liked by, or that leads to him. 3mo
TheBookHippie @Graywacke 🤣🤣I live where Trump is hailed as the new saviour appointed by God. So in my world- not much change. In other parts of the country HUGE strides. It‘s why I both stay to fight and leave often to the city and ocean to gain perspective or stay sane 🤪. As for the rest -well I‘m use to people not liking my opinion- daily adventure. 🙄 I try to be as charitable to them as I can, this drives trumplovers insane, as you can imagine. 3mo
GingerAntics @TheBookHippie oh they definitely were there. I think, sadly, the fractures where there and the racist backlash against the first black president combined to make it the prime moment for that bumbling bafoon in office to come in and start his BS. He‘s a big part of the reason these pro-birth people are getting as bold as they are. We are way too close to Gilead for comfort. 3mo
TheBookHippie @GingerAntics YES!!!!! Gilead...it‘s like my town (Betsy Devos hometown 🤢🤢🤢🤮) spread over the entire nation and things I‘ve fought for and told people about and they refused to believe me ...is country wide now. Surreal. Scary as **** 3mo
GingerAntics @TheBookHippie oh my god I‘m so sorry you‘ve had to live in her hometown. I‘m glad you‘ve survived. I usually find it nearly impossible to convince people that things are as bad as they really are. So many people with their heads in the sand. I think they‘re just trying to make it through this presidency, but still. This is no time for heads to be in the sand. It‘s terrifying. I completely agree with you on that one. 3mo
TheBookHippie @GingerAntics I graduated with her brother -leader of Blackwater —now be me a social justice liberal hippie in a town that is 97 percent alt right. Now imagine my kiddos and my daily fight. This is why I work so hard. Why I throw myself into volunteering. Also why occasionally I‘m crabby with zero tolerance 🤣🤣🤣🙌🏻😳🤪 3mo
GingerAntics @TheBookHippie oh my god, it‘s got to be scary raising kids in that environment. Sheesh. I‘m afraid to have a kid here in TX, but that almost sounds worse. It‘s clearly a miracle that you manage to have tolerance of any kind. 3mo
TheBookHippie @GingerAntics there are days...but then I see all the little lives I‘ve affected and carry on... 3mo
GingerAntics @TheBookHippie your students do look like little sweethearts. 3mo
39 likes1 stack add29 comments
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rjsthumbelina
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For some reason, I really like the imagery used here
#hugonuts

Lcsmcat I highlighted this section too! 4mo
21 likes1 comment
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rjsthumbelina
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It's interesting that the printing press came about at the same time that people became more accepting of different viewpoints. Or was it that the printing press forced people to reckon more frequently with different viewpoints, which then caused people to necessarily be a little more open?
#hugonuts

Lcsmcat If you look at it like the difference between newspapers and the internet, I think you get an idea of how big a change this was, how much more information was suddenly available to people. 4mo
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rjsthumbelina
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Am interesting concept that I hadn't really considered before reading this section. I suppose I can see the reasoning behind it.
#hugonuts

suvata It may have been the first time that many people were exposed to different religious ideas. Love the way he describes it. 4mo
21 likes1 comment
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Lcsmcat
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame | Victor Hugo, Frederic Shoberl
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Any other issues around the architecture or Hugo‘s philosophy of the voice of the people that you want to explore? #Hugonuts

tournevis Hugo *hated* the modern architecture of his day, the Haussmannian style that we today think of typically Parisian. He witnessed the raising of large swaths of medieval and enlightenment Paris for Haussmann's projects and hated what that ment for what Paris looked and felt like. What Pakes Paris look like Paris today? He thought it was ugly. 4mo
tournevis What *makes* Paris today. *Makes*. 4mo
Lcsmcat That does shine through in his contemptuous comparison of those buildings to skeletons showing through dying women‘s skin! (no subtlety there!) 4mo
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Graywacke I struggled with all this. This sweeping tour of the geography of a city I don‘t know, this meandering iffy philosophical/idea play with buildings as texts - turned and twisted in a hundred iffy manifestations. Frollo is entertaining, a madman of Hugo‘s persuasion. 4mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I agree that, especially on a first reading, it‘s a difficult concept. I see Frollo‘s attitude as one of fear of loss of his own power. If people can read, they won‘t need priests to explain everything to them. Sorry @tournevis but I go back to the musical for a succinct explanation. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7mPFOvHa0E4 This is subtitled in English for those who don‘t speak French. 4mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Also, I liked Hugo‘s image of the printed word being the flock of birds who fly in every direction and stay above the flood! 4mo
tournevis @Lcsmcat 😋 I don't have to click it! 😋 4mo
BookwormAHN So I switched to the audio book. Trying to figure out the pronunciation of some of the French names was killing me. I'm also @Graywacke having trouble with all the geography. I'm am enjoying the characters. 4mo
Lcsmcat @BookwormAHN I sometimes stop reading to google buildings just to see what he‘s talking about. Like Saint-Sulpice, whose towers he compared to clarinets. 😀 4mo
Lcsmcat @BookwormAHN I sometimes stop reading to google buildings just to see what he‘s talking about. Like Saint-Sulpice, whose towers he compared to clarinets. 😀 4mo
suvata It‘s funny that what Hugo thought of as modern is “classical“ and beautiful to us. Makes me wonder what future generations will think of some of that monstrosities we have built in recent centuries. 4mo
Lcsmcat @suvata It‘s like the way Victorian architecture was viewed here in the 1960‘s. 4mo
MellieAntoinette I feel like the best character is Oaris itself! I feel like Frollo, Quasimodo, Esmeralda all get to experience the city in different ways inviting us in as both reader and tourist. It‘s nice! 4mo
Lcsmcat @MellieAntoinette It‘s fun, isn‘t it? Immersing yourself in another place and age. One of my favorite things about literature. 4mo
BarbaraJean @Graywacke I struggled with the geography as well. I‘m trying to enjoy the descriptions without trying to map it all out! And I had a hard time with his argument that architecture was the main message/text of the people until the printing press. I mean, yes—the printing press fundamentally changed communication & the way ideas are disseminated, even the way we interact with ideas at all—but I don‘t know that architecture is the precursor/parallel! 4mo
BarbaraJean I do feel like I know Frollo, Quasimodo, and the cathedral a bit better—I especially liked the description of Quasimodo‘s relationship with the cathedral—so beautiful and sad. I‘m still so curious how Frollo is going to develop! And I‘m also getting frustrated with Hugo‘s penchant for breaking up the story with his essay-like tangents. I want the story! But I should have expected it, after all the philosophical/historical tangents in Les Mis.😜 4mo
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean Frollo is a fascinatingly complex dude, isn‘t he? And Quasimodo breaks my heart. His love of the bells and the gargoyles is touching. As for Hugo‘s digressions, I‘m enjoying them more on this go round. I remember being frustrated with them the first time (as I was with Les Mis) too. 4mo
Graywacke @BarbaraJean I had to spend some time googling (or whatever the Safari equivalent is) maps of Paris through time. The architecture - I think it‘s true there is expression there, but - yeah - a different kind of thing. And it‘s not like were no books. Doesn‘t blend with his argument in my mind. 4mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean - ok, digressions. I‘m trying to be more open to them, but they bothered me a lot in Les Mis. Hoping by taking this one piecemeal I‘ll embrace them more. 4mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean - and the bell - Quasimodo‘s relationship with that vibrating bell... I don‘t know, it‘s a Hugo thing I guess. No, I like these strange characters. 4mo
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Lcsmcat
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No wonder my TBR is exploding. 😆 Get ready to talk about architecture and the printing press, among other things. #hugonuts

suvata I think it‘s funny the misconceptions he had about the printing press. Kind of how people thought of the Internet 20 to 30 years ago. Funny. 4mo
Lcsmcat @suvata Exactly! 4mo
janeycanuck Hugo‘s head would explode if he ever ran into self-publishing. 4mo
36 likes3 comments
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Daisey
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I‘ve been busy the last few days without much time for Litsy or reading (other than some audio). I live and teach in one community and then spend much of my summer working on the family farm in another community. Last weekend the levee protecting that farm broke, and today was the first day I was back there to help. The photo is the view from our sheds looking out at the fields. Tonight I hope to get through a chapter for #Hugonuts before sleep.

Texreader Oh my that‘s horrible! My parents‘ farm can flood but just a field or two. Not like this!! 4mo
Graciouswarriorprincess Sending you hugs! 4mo
Lcsmcat So sorry! I hope there are other, higher fields! 4mo
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Daisey @Texreader @Graciouswarriorprincess @Lcsmcat Thank you all! The whole river bottom that includes our farm (almost all our row crops) and others is under water. Luckily there are no homes in the floodplain. Some of my family and others have to get in and out by ATV or boat, but the homes are on higher ground. We moved some more things in case of higher water and sandbagged today to keep the water from cutting through the levees in other places. 4mo
Catt Take care! 4mo
Daisey @Catt Thank you! 3mo
54 likes6 comments
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Lcsmcat
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame | Victor Hugo, Frederic Shoberl
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“‘Who is it?‘ cried the scholar in a tone as gracious as that of a hungry mastiff disturbed at its bone.” I‘m loving these descriptions of Frollo! #hugonuts

Aimeesue Awwwww, puppy! 4mo
mreads ❤🐕❤ 4mo
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