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rwmg

rwmg

Joined May 2017

Mainly mysteries, SF, history (fact and fiction)
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Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
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Beowulf (Revised) by Seamus Heaney
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Frankenstein | Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
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Pickpick

The story of how the Sandman, the King of Dreams, is captured and stripped of his powers and how he regains them.

There were times when I wasn't quite sure what was going on but I will continue with this graphic novel series at some point.

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The Truth | Terry Pratchett
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William de Worde invents the newspaper and exposes dastardly political shenanigans to replace Lord Vetinari as Patrician.

Not perhaps Pratchett's funniest but plenty of wordplay and wry observations about the world.

Zoes_Human It did have many excellent observations. In particular the following has always stuck with me:

“Insofar as he'd formed any opinion of her, it was that she suffered from misplaced gentility and the mistaken belief that etiquette meant good breeding. She mistook mannerisms for manners.”
4d
rwmg @Zoes_Human The trouble with quoting Pratchett is knowing when to stop 3d
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The Truth | Terry Pratchett

Fire was always the terror in those parts of the city where wood and thatch predominated. That was why everyone had been so dead set against any form of fire brigade, reasoning—with impeccable Ankh-Morpork logic—that any bunch of men who were paid to put out fires would naturally see to it that there was a plentiful supply of fires to put out.

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The Truth | Terry Pratchett

And William was good with words. Truth was what he told. Honesty was sometimes not the same thing.

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The Truth | Terry Pratchett
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Home Fire: A Novel | Kamila Shamsie
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A powerful re-telling of Sophocles' Antigone for the 21st century. The echoes in the names were obvious, some of the twists were foreseeable from knowing the play, but some decidedly were not.

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The Truth | Terry Pratchett

"Ankh-Morpork people considered that spelling was a sort of optional extra. They believed in it in the same way they believed in punctuation; it didn‘t matter where you put it, so long as it was there."

And haven't we all known people like that?

PlayingBonny I started learning ancient Babylonian (because of reasons, obvs), and this is a pretty good description of it 😂 7d
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Home Fire | Kamila Shamsie
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The book was a powerful piece of pleading even nearly 170 years later. Something that took me by surprise was the casual acceptance that, however devastating, the death of one's child was so general an experience that the author could use it as a commonality that would arouse sympathies for the slaves amongst her white readers, though I must admit I did roll my eyes a bit at the sentimentality of the portrayal of Eva.

Tamra I remember being very moved. It‘s time for a reread. 1w
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Space Opera | Catherynne M. Valente
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Bailedbailed

I read the first chapter. She's trying far too hard to be the next Douglas Adams and I couldn't face 300 pages of it.

shanaqui I'm so glad to see other people feeling that way! 1w
rwmg @shanaqui It's a pity because the concept sounded fun 1w
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Brief History of the Celts (UK) | Peter Berresford Ellis
Mehso-so

Some interesting nuggets but I get the same feeling I do with the author's fiction, that he views the Celts through much too rosy glasses. And his obsession with seeking parallels with Vedic Indians got a bit tedious at times.

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Ruthiella American attitudes haven‘t changed much in 100+ years. 2w
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Of course, in a novel, people‘s hearts break, and they die, and that is the end of it; and in a story this is very convenient. But in real life we do not die when all that makes life bright dies to us. There is a most busy and important round of eating, drinking, dressing, walking, visiting, buying, selling, talking, reading, and all that makes up what is commonly called living, yet to be gone through; and this yet remained to Augustine.

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Untitled | To Be Confirmed
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Possible reading for #October2019

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Beautiful People | Simon Doonan
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Treebook TBR shelves

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Birthdays Happen | Herbert Kavet
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VioletBramble Nice. Happy Birthday Robert! 🎉🎂 2w
rwmg Thank you Kelly 2w
DaveGreen7777 Happy Birthday! 🎂🎉 2w
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rwmg Thank you Dave 2w
Ddzmini Happy birthday 🎊🎉🎂🎁🎈 🥳📖😋 2w
rwmg Thank you Danielle 2w
Reggie Happy belated Birthday!!! Nice haul!! 2w
rwmg Thank you Reggie 2w
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The First Man in Rome | Colleen McCullough
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The Man Who Died | Antti Tuomainen
Mehso-so

Jaakko is determined to find out who poisoned him and why and to preserve his mushroom export business as a legacy in the weeks if not days he has left.

The investigation itself was interesting although it did sag a bit in the middle. I found the action sequences confusing and had to read them several times to work out what had actually happened. Would I read more of his books? I might but I wouldn't go out looking for them.

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The Man Who Died | Antti Tuomainen

I‘d asked for this myself, suggesting we go on holiday and return to our bungalow. Or should I say ‘our‘ bungalow? How much of our lives do we put in inverted commas, I wonder? Imaginations, assumptions, things we‘ve made up, memories that remain so beautiful in our minds though the truth is something else.

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The Man Who Died | Antti Tuomainen
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The Man Who Died | Antti Tuomainen

Then I remember – or rather I see (because memories are like a cinema where you can‘t find the exit door)

Excerpt From: "The Man Who Died" by Antti Tuomainen. Scribd.
This material may be protected by copyright.

Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/376042803

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Pickpick

Good bio of the short-reigned emperor who tried to revive paganism which avoids the trap of making him an Enlightenment poster boy and attempts to see him in his own terms. Some annoying clusters of typos towards the end, and it could have done with some maps and a family tree.

Maude Oh, that sounds interesting. 3w
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The Man Who Died | Antti Tuomainen

And you can say what you like about death, but its slimming effect is not to be underestimated. The swimming trunks, which pinched my hips at the beginning of summer and were so tight round my groin that they could have given me a hernia, now sit nicely, thanks to the fasting regime I instituted at dinner last night.

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The Universe in a Nutshell | Stephen W. Hawking
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Julian and Education:

Unlike virtually every leader since, the emperor thought about it, encouraged it (Libanius comments that on his march from Constantinople to Antioch the emperor “was easy of access to teachers”) and wrote about it. But Julian went as far as to state explicitly that the brighter and better educated are more useful members of society.

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The Colour of Magic | Terry Pratchett
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#7days7covers #day2 @Ruthiella. Sorry, I missed one day because I was too busy reading 😅 😅

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The Long Divorce | Edmund Crispin
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The usual fun and games

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On the Move: A Life | Oliver Sacks
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#7days7covers #day1 Thanks to @Ruthiella for inviting me. I don't know who's already playing and who isn't so I can only say join in if you feel like it.

Ruthiella I need to read more Sacks! I‘ve only read An Anthropologist on Mars so far!😀 (edited) 3w
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The Long Divorce | Edmund Crispin
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Sea of Sorrow: A Novel of Odysseus | Vicky Alvear Shecter, Libbie Hawker, David Blixt
Pickpick

Variable. I didn't like the sections on Telemachus, but Circe, the Sirens, and Calypso were great

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Interpreter | Diego Marani
Mehso-so

Not as good as the author's other books in this loosely connected trilogy. Some good ideas but he needs to pay more attention to the details. For a story about language and identity, it is very vague about what language is being used at times. In the end it wasn't bad enough to DNF it but I was conscious of reading it quickly to get it out of the way.

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Interpreter | Diego Marani
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Language learning as psychotherapy

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Interpreter | Diego Marani
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Interpreter | Diego Marani
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Megara 😅 yikes... 4w
Megara Does this mean no kissing too? 4w
rwmg Use sanitizer first 😂 4w
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rwmg Or ask your mum to wash your mouth out with soap afterwards 4w
Megara 😆 4w
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Interpreter | Diego Marani
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Pickpick

A collection of short stories and one novella inspired the author's attempts to come to terms with his father's suicide when he (the author) was in his teens.

The author is very good at describing the natural and human scenery in which the stories are set. I enjoyed the novella the most because it did actually tell a story, while the short stories were more like snapshots with something added to provoke classroom discussion.

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A Study in Scarlet | Arthur Conan Doyle
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The first Sherlock Holmes novel, written before the short stories which made him famous.
It kept me turning the pages. The murderer's reason for the murders was fascinating. I would like to know if it was based on the type of thing that did actually go on in the historical situation or was just prejudice.
The edition was slightly odd in that there was an afterword discussing the historical background to “A Scandal in Bohemia“ rather than this book

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A Study in Scarlet | Arthur Conan Doyle
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Panpan

Space travellers land on a planet which seems to have modelled on Hieronymous Bosch's picture "The Garden of Earthly Delights".

Unfortunately the author's descriptive powers are not really up to the task he has set himself.

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Pickpick

P D James in top form.