Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
Lcsmcat

Lcsmcat

Joined May 2016

reading now icon
Sutton by J. R. Moehringer
reading now icon
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
blurb
Lcsmcat
Sutton | J. R. Moehringer
post image

My grandfather used to be annoyed by people asking if we were related to Willie Sutton. (Spoiler alert - we‘re not.) So I thought it would be interesting to learn something about him.

review
Lcsmcat
post image
Pickpick

Finished this on the treadmill this morning, and like others by Egan that I‘ve read, it almost worked for me, but not quite. Maybe it would have been better in print, or maybe I‘m just not rock‘n‘roll enough for it. Low pick for me. #unpopularOpinion

38 likes1 stack add
blurb
Lcsmcat
post image

“Starting” (because I actually started it in the store) one of the books I bought on vacation.

44 likes1 stack add
review
Lcsmcat
Dinosaurs | LYDIA. MILLET
post image
Pickpick

Reading this at the same time as Robinson Crusoe really pointed out how introspective Gil is. (And how much more I like him than Robinson 😀) This also feels like a book that will reward multiple readings. It touches on so many topics that could be depressing, but is actually hope-filled. I look forward to my book club‘s discussion on Thursday.

BkClubCare Yay! I liked this one, lots of layers 1w
49 likes1 comment
blurb
Lcsmcat
Green Valley Bookfair | Mt. Crawford, VA (Bookstore)
post image

As promised, the #bookhaul from our recent vacation. Most, including the T-shirt, are from the tagged bookstore, although we (of course) visited others and spread the love around. And there are five not shown because they‘re gifts.

Ruthiella Awesome haul! 🤩 2w
Suet624 Such bounty! 2w
dabbe 🤩🤩🤩 2w
Cuilin What a haul!!! 📚📚📚📚😍 2w
TheLudicReader Randy Rainbow! ❤️ 1w
47 likes5 comments
quote
Lcsmcat
Dinosaurs | LYDIA. MILLET
post image

Current book club selection.

blurb
Lcsmcat
Green Valley Bookfair | Mt. Crawford, VA (Bookstore)
post image

At breakfast in the hotel this morning my husband gets a pop-up ad for a special event at this bookstore. OMG! The prices were amazing and we now have two boxes of books to cart home and catalog. I‘ll post a picture of the books from our whole trip when I get home. 📚📖📚

Ruthiella Wow! Exciting! 😃 2w
Bookwormjillk Oh darn, 104 miles away. I am tempted! 2w
Lcsmcat @Bookwormjillk They do mail order. 😈 2w
44 likes3 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
post image

Written by a man born 3 years before my g-g-grandfather who grew up in the same valley, this memoir gives a flavor of what his life might have been like. Over the top flowery language, as you would expect, but with some sly humor.

review
Lcsmcat
Almost Romance: A Memoir | Nancy Balbirer
post image
Pickpick

This picture has nothing to do with the book - it‘s the log cabin we‘re vacationing in. I enjoyed this funny, angsty, memoir of how the author “found” love with the guy she‘d loved for 32 years, stayed friends with, but never made it work until they were in their 50‘s. Nice vacation read. I liked reading about them, but I think they‘d both drive me crazy in real life.

Leftcoastzen What a cute place! 2w
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen It‘s an AirBNB. Outside its log cabin, but inside all the mod cons. And the Amish buggies go right by the front windows. 2w
kspenmoll Nice place. Love the deck! 2w
35 likes3 comments
review
Lcsmcat
Jane Austen at Home | Lucy Worsley
post image
Pickpick

Lucy hits it out of the park, as always. She shows the true Jane we all know was there, despite the Victorian family-rewrite of her life. I learned so much and thought about all her books in different ways (and I have a 50-year history of reading Austen) and entertained me along the way. I highly recommend!

Lcsmcat (Picture is a sticker I saw in the wall at Shy Bear Brewers on my vacation.) 2w
PurpleyPumpkin That sticker made me lol!😂🤣 2w
Lcsmcat @PurpleyPumpkin Me too! Right in the brewery! 2w
38 likes3 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
Untitled | Anonymous
post image

#bookspin for a very hot July. @TheAromaofBooks

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! 3w
24 likes1 comment
review
Lcsmcat
Shakespeare: The Man Who Pays the Rent | Judi Dench, Brendan O'Hea
post image
Pickpick

Reading this, hearing Judi Dench‘s voice in my head, makes me want to reread every Shakespeare play, and watch the RSC productions online. I wish I‘d had it nearby as we read them in the #shakespearereadalong days!

TheBookHippie ♥️♥️♥️♥️ 1mo
39 likes1 stack add1 comment
blurb
Lcsmcat
Shakespeare: The Man Who Pays the Rent | Judi Dench, Brendan O'Hea
post image

Starting this one tonight. 🙂

44 likes1 stack add
review
Lcsmcat
The Lowland | Jhumpa Lahiri
post image
Pickpick

I loved this novel, and learned so much about India that I hadn‘t known. Subhash was my favorite character (so glad he got his happy ending!) but Lahiri made me love all of them a bit. Well, maybe I just pitied his mother. So happy to finally get to this one. #doublespin #24in2024

TheBookHippie Oh I have this in my pile! 1mo
Lcsmcat @TheBookHippie Bump it up! It‘s both atmospheric and accessible. 1mo
TheBookHippie @Lcsmcat Will do. I love atmospheric. 1mo
Jas16 I really liked this one too. 1mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! 1mo
43 likes5 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
post image

We had time to kill between church and a graduation party, so of course we went to a bookstore. @Graywacke I blame you for the tagged book. 😀

Leftcoastzen Nice haul! 1mo
Graywacke Oh, blame so accepted. Yay. Enjoy. But maybe read Flannery O,Connor 1st? I mean, she‘s irresistible. I‘m curious about the Seinfeld. I want to watch those shows again. 1mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke It‘s going to be hard to decide what to read first, once I finish my current Lahiri. 1mo
45 likes3 comments
review
Lcsmcat
post image
Pickpick

My #bookspin for June was a wild ride. I enjoyed every adventure along with Lily. Number 17 for #24in2024, so I‘m ahead of schedule.

Jas16 You are tearing through your list! 1mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! 1mo
42 likes2 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
Untitled | Untitled
post image

My #bookspin and #doublespin for June. But it‘s not really June already, is it? Y‘all are just pranking me, right?

MallenNC Time is flying! 1mo
TheAromaofBooks Yay!!! Enjoy!!! 1mo
30 likes2 comments
review
Lcsmcat
The River We Remember: A Novel | William Kent Krueger
post image
Pickpick

This was a mixed experience for me. His writing is so good, but there were parts that I felt like the conflicts resolved unrealistically easily. And the ending sucked. I‘d have preferred he save the unrealistic resolution for that part of the plot. 😀 I look forward to my book club discussion next week.

blurb
Lcsmcat
The River We Remember: A Novel | William Kent Krueger
post image

Starting this tonight for my irl book club.

AmyG I absolutely loved this. 2mo
37 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
Lcsmcat
Tom Lake: A Novel | Ann Patchett
post image
Pickpick

Patchett never disappoints, and this is no exception. I finished it outside, with a bowl of cherries by my side. Knowing Our Town and The Cherry Orchard add depth, but are not necessary for the enjoyment of this warm novel. Highly recommended.

49 likes2 stack adds
review
Lcsmcat
post image
Pickpick

If you like contemplative memoir and love nature, this is for you. I finished it yesterday and switching to a new “treadmill book” was hard. I looked forward to this one every morning.

Suet624 Sounds right up my alley. 2mo
Lcsmcat @Suet624 I hope you enjoy it. If you liked Braiding Sweetgrass, while they‘re not the same at all there‘s a similar “feel” if you know what I mean. Sound scientific knowledge that isn‘t afraid to admit there‘s more than science as a way to view the world. 2mo
Tamra I borrowed the audio. 😄 2mo
39 likes3 stack adds3 comments
quote
Lcsmcat
post image

Rereading this in preparation for Tom Lake. I haven‘t read it since high school - 44 years ago!

willaful Oh, I didn't realize there was a connection. Hmm. 2mo
Lcsmcat @willaful Our Town and The Cherry Orchard. But I‘ve read Our Town more recently. 😂 2mo
31 likes1 stack add2 comments
review
Lcsmcat
post image
Pickpick

Funny and insightful as always with Lamott. While the political references are dated the strategies she used to get through Bush frère will work in today‘s worse divisions. And the cats on the pillow agree. #doublespin #24in2024

quote
Lcsmcat
post image

Starting this today.

23 likes1 stack add
review
Lcsmcat
Loon Lake: A Novel | E.L. Doctorow
post image
Mehso-so

There were some memorable lines, but it was too much work for too little reward for my taste. Very “I‘m being avant garde now” feel to it. None of the characters were particularly likable and particularly not the protagonist. Very different from Ragtime, which I loved. At least I got it off my shelf to make room for other books. #doublespin & 15 for #24in2024

Ruthiella I loved Ragtime too and no other Doctorow book I‘ve read since has lived up to it. (edited) 2mo
Lcsmcat @Ruthiella Agreed, although I did like 2mo
Ruthiella I‘ve not read that one yet. I liked The March. Homer and Langley was OK. I didn‘t like Billy Bathgate. 2mo
Lcsmcat @Ruthiella Good to know. H & L is on my shelf and I was debating whether it kept its spot. 😀 2mo
38 likes4 comments
review
Lcsmcat
Dreamers of the Day: A Novel | Mary Doria Russell
post image
Pickpick

My pacifist heart loved this book and cried over it in equal measure. Featuring Gertrude Bell, whom I first met years ago in Wallace‘s Desert Queen, T E Lawrence, and Winston Churchill as minor characters, the protagonist is witness to the Cairo Conference and its fallout that we are still experiencing. The story is engaging, and the final chapter provides much to think about. And Rosie the dachshund steals the show. #bookspin #24in2024

Jas16 Sounds really interesting. 2mo
Lcsmcat @Jas16 It was, and very well written. 2mo
KathyWheeler This book was the first time I‘d heard of Gertrude Bell. It was an interesting story. 2mo
See All 6 Comments
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! 2mo
Lcsmcat @KathyWheeler She‘s portrayed more sympathetically in 2mo
KathyWheeler @Lcsmcat Thanks. I‘ll have to check that out. 2mo
47 likes2 stack adds6 comments
review
Lcsmcat
The Ivy Tree | Mary Stewart
post image
Pickpick

Mary Stewart is a go-to when I need a comfort read, and this did not disappoint.

blurb
Lcsmcat
The Children | Edith Wharton
post image

Some preliminary thoughts. Rose is of the Old New York - staying in her unhappy marriage and arranging things, always calm and dignified. The elder Wheaters are the worst of the nouveau riche - marrying and divorcing on a whim and chasing the latest pleasure. Martin was born into Rose‘s world, but he doesn‘t live there. He runs off to make his fortune, loving an image of her (and an image of Joyce). Judith acts as a catalyst to reveal all this.

Lcsmcat All of them made me uncomfortable, for different reasons. And did we get the typical unhappy Wharton ending? #whartonbuddyread 2mo
See All 41 Comments
Lcsmcat Photo from an eBay listing for the 1928 edition. I just loved that dust jacket! 2mo
Currey @Lcsmcat love the dust jacket: “In a world of easy divorce…” makes it sound like a pot boiler. 2mo
Lcsmcat @Currey Doesn‘t it? I was highly amused. 2mo
Currey @Lcsmcat In regards the ending, I was left believing that the children would be fine, they may never rise above their odd up bringing but they were resilient. Judith would probably marry although she was sure she would not. Joyce even seemed to have found a place that gave her some escape from the crazy world (of her own making). That leaves Rose and Martin. 2mo
Lcsmcat @Currey I feel like Rose and Martin were just as damaged by their upbringing as the children were, but of course in a different way. Is Wharton suggesting how difficult it is to escape one‘s rearing? 2mo
Currey @Lcsmcat Would Rose have married Dobree if she thought she was free? Dobree seemed vaguely interested in her between eyeing Judith and before courting Judith‘s mother. They would have made nice Old World New York partners. Although I think Rose really did care for Martin whereas Martin cared for some image he had of Rose not the person herself (edited) 2mo
Currey @Lcsmcat Martin did escape somewhat when he was off building bridges or such things far away from New York. He was also good with the children as he took it on as a job. Wharton saying you can only escape so far and you will pay for it in the end? 2mo
Lcsmcat @Currey I don‘t think Martin and Rose would have been happy, although Rose wouldn‘t admit it. But I‘m not sure how she and Dobree would have got on. He seemed to want more (as evidenced by his going for Joyce.) And Marin was definitely better at loving images he created than real people. All those conversations where he played both parts! 2mo
batsy I'm mostly in agreement with your thoughts. I was so disturbed by how calm and unflappable Rose was, the cost of always maintaining tact and discretion. I think Wharton meant to show Old NY values as a prison of sorts, that Martin was running away from. The children left me feeling sad—although we do see Judith from Martin's melancholy POV, the fact that he catches a glimpse of sadness on her face makes me wonder if she's doomed to playing a role. 2mo
Graywacke Sorry all. I finished, but i‘ve had no power since a storm wiped out part of Houston‘s power system Thursday evening. So, i‘ll come back later. Saving phone battery. 2mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I wondered if that affected you. Stay safe! 2mo
Lcsmcat @batsy I too think Martin was running away from the old NY prison, but his attraction to Rose and his ruminations on his Uncle‘s adventures makes me think he couldn‘t quite get away. 2mo
Lcsmcat @batsy The book opens and closes with Martin alone, but I‘m not sure “lonely” equals “sad.” With the kids, though we don‘t get to know really how they turn out, I don‘t have high hopes. The dearth of any education for the girls limits them even more than the society of the time would. And the boys aren‘t much better. 2mo
CarolynM I read it all at once so you‘re getting all my thoughts here. The children‘s plight was truly heartbreaking & I could sympathize with Martin wanting to help, but it was a doomed enterprise from the start. I particularly felt for Judith, forced to take on so much responsibility so young while her parents avoided all responsibility. Was the title intended to highlight the childishness of the parents too? ⬇️ 2mo
CarolynM I liked the way Wharton dealt with the relationship between M & J. Given that it was not unusual at that time for teenage girls to marry much older men & she was only just short of marriageable age I could understand why he occasionally slipped into thinking of her that way, then felt bad about it. I also liked that she was so oblivious. ⬇️ 2mo
CarolynM The end was so sad. The poor steps being subjected to the nutty child rearing theories of the Lohengrin College (Princess Buondelmonte was hilarious and infuriating all at once) & poor little Chip! (edited) 2mo
Lcsmcat @CarolynM I loved that Judith was oblivious too. It made it better somehow. I hadn‘t thought of the title as referring to the parents too, but it makes sense. 2mo
Lcsmcat @CarolynM The Princess was a hoot . I loved how the kids took her down a peg! 2mo
cindyash @CarolynM Oh I thought the title definitly was for the parents as well. And Martin reminds me of the old chestnut “the road to hell is paved with good intentions. “ 2mo
cindyash @Lcsmcat yes that was probably my fav part! also thought about giving parents advice not sure thats gotten any better 2mo
batsy @CarolynM I liked that as I read it Martin became more complicated, and less of a creep as I first read him in the early section. A testament to Wharton's ability to shade her characters with nuance and complexity. 2mo
Lcsmcat @batsy @CarolynM Wharton did an excellent job of showing Martin‘s inner state, especially in a book not told in first person. He did become more sympathetic. But so clueless! How did he think he could actually change those parents‘ behavior? 2mo
jewright This was interesting to me because as a teacher I constantly see kids ripped in and out of homes and schools in parents‘ unstable relationships. I guess it sadly isn‘t only a recent problem. I really thought Martín and Judith would get married, so I was surprised by the ending. 2mo
Graywacke (No power, but better internet connection) - @Lcsmcat I like your analysis a lot in the initial post. I hadn‘t thought of it that way. My 1st thought on finishing is that without Martin‘s attraction to a 15-yr-old, this book has not drive. That awkward tension makes the book work…and is really the only thing that makes it work. If i had that right, feels odd. 2mo
Graywacke @batsy etc - for what it‘s worth, i grew to really appreciate Rose. Her unfeeling goddess of always correct judgement was clearly only on the outside. She had feelings, she tried. Martin was a mess. I think Rose handled it all with a lot of grace. 2mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat etc - I also found Martin‘s internal mental mess well done and interesting. He never understood what he wanted. Even at the end, he is as lost as he was in the beginning. His thoughts tell us what he couldn‘t understand. 2mo
Graywacke @Currey @CarolynM etc - here is an alternate view of Judith - she managed Martin like she managed everything else. She knew all Rose knew, and she knew and worked Martin‘s attraction. And when he crossed the line, she knew exactly how to play to disarm him. And when he was off to London, she knew he was gone and that his usefulness has played out. So she went along with his promise to return. Just a thought. Could be (I imagine). 2mo
Graywacke @cindyash were Martin‘s intentions always good? (He really was in a state of denial. Maybe several denials.) 2mo
Graywacke @jewright Economics plays a role in these broken families. Wealthy families can be cruel (although it takes intent, like here). But poverty is a lot different. 2mo
Currey @Graywacke I like thinking about your alternative take on Judith. Perhaps she did know all that was going on in Martin‘s mess of a mind and just played him. That is an even more cynical reading. (edited) 2mo
Lcsmcat @Currey @Graywacke While I don‘t want Judith to be that cynical, it makes sense, given all she had been exposed to in her young life. And I do like to think of her taking control. Who among us women hasn‘t had to “manage” an older man at some point? And I know I did it by playing dumb (instead of reporting him like I wish I had!) (edited) 2mo
CarolynM @Graywacke @Currey Um…I really don‘t think there‘s anything to suggest Judith is that calculating. I wouldn‘t have thought that laughing at Martin when he indicated he might be interested in her would be a good play if she were. 2mo
CarolynM @batsy Yes, at first I was very unsure about Martin‘s intentions, but I think he was trying do the right thing by the children. 2mo
Graywacke @CarolynM i was thinking laughing was the perfect defuser. No one gets insulted because it turns the proposal into funny suggestion. 2mo
Lcsmcat @CarolynM @Graywacke I guess it depends on _what_ she was calculating. If the idea was to avoid marriage with Martin but not lose his friendship/protection, I think she did pretty well. 2mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat i think she was just using Martin for a while. I don‘t think she was mean or conniving, just taking advantage of his willingness to help. She handles the princess quite well and that was serious. She saw right through Rose‘s formality. Judith, to me, was a sharp one. 2mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Never mean. Conniving maybe. Certainly clever - she couldn‘t have watched the adults around her without learning something of how to get her way. And stealing the money to run away is a character defining moment. 2mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat good point on the stealing! I hadn‘t connected that. 2mo
37 likes2 stack adds41 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
Happy Litsyversary! | Special Events
post image

Y‘all, I can‘t believe it‘s been 8 years! This community has brought me so much joy. Thank you all for being here. ❤️

IuliaC Happy Litsyversary! 🎉📚 2mo
mrp27 Happy Litsyversary! 🎉📚🎉📚 (edited) 2mo
TheBookHippie How wonderful 📚📚📚📚 2mo
See All 17 Comments
dabbe HL! 💙🩵💙 2mo
batsy Happy Litsyversary! And thank you for all your work on our author group reads 🙂📚 2mo
Deblovestoread Happy Litsyversary 🎉🎉🎉 2mo
Jas16 Happy Litsyversary 🙌🏽📚🎉 2mo
BarbaraJean Happy Litsyversary!! So glad you‘re here! 🎉💜📚 2mo
LeahBergen 🎉🎉🎉 2mo
Monica5 Happy Litsyversary 🎉 2mo
julesG Happy Litsyversary! 🎉🎉 2mo
Librarybelle Happy Litsyversary! 2mo
Ddzmini Happy Litsyversary 🎉🎊🥳📚 2mo
Lcsmcat @batsy Thanks! I get more out of them than I put into them. 😀 2mo
CarolynM Thank you Linda. You are a big part of making Litsy a great place. Happy Litsyversary🎉 (edited) 2mo
Lcsmcat @CarolynM I feel the same way about you. Thanks for being my book-friend. 2mo
31 likes17 comments
review
Lcsmcat
What to Eat | Marion Nestle
post image
Pickpick

A good compilation of solid advice, most of which I knew, but also a look inside the pressures put on us by Big Food. I was a little surprised that she didn‘t suggest buying directly from farmers, which is how I deal with it. But it‘s aimed at a larger audience I suppose that may not have access to farmers markets and CSAs.

37 likes2 stack adds
quote
Lcsmcat
The Children | Edith Wharton
post image

Sorry for the late post - it‘s been a morning. 🙄
We seem to be following Martin to a place we were all hoping he wouldn‘t go, and he‘s deluding himself about. What role does Mrs. Sellarshave in this - is she pushing him that way even as she dreads it? And how does Mr. Dobree‘s visit impact Roseand Martin‘s relationship with? #WhartonBuddyRead

Graywacke Martin is a mess. It‘s an interesting, if frustrating, look at his internal contradictions and inability to see what we can see. Rose is somewhat heroic here, managing and putting up with Martin. Of course there‘s more to that in Rose, prompted as she is by some jealousy. Still, she‘s being way more than reasonable. 2mo
See All 18 Comments
Currey @Lcsmcat We all seem to be having that kind of day! Martin is certainly more aware and working harder at keeping up the delusion regarding his feelings toward Judith. He knows he is being foolish. Mrs Sellars has her own delusions about her relationship with Martin. Martin‘s comment about loving Mrs Sellars the most when he isn‘t with her as he can then provide both sides of the dialogue really summed it up for me. (edited) 2mo
Graywacke I‘m of two minds of Martin on Judith. In many ways he is between normal caring and in-love with Judith and he honestly doesn‘t know where his emotions truly are. In many ways he has a father‘s or brother‘s affection. But also he‘s the leering fool he imagined he observed the doctor to be. Clearly his affection for Judith has washed out his love of Rose, but it‘s a different kind of affection. 👇 2mo
Graywacke 👆 Since he doesn‘t seem to know what it is, perhaps we can‘t know either. But we probably can know more than him. He‘s a mess. (edited) 2mo
Graywacke @Currey Martin‘s way of handling women? He prefers to think for them. Or, her prefers to mute their concerns… ?? 2mo
Lcsmcat @Currey We all win those arguments, don‘t we? And as to him loving her most when not with her, I almost used this quote “He knew now how much she loved him—but did he know how much he loved her?” 2mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I think he‘s convinced that he‘s being avuncular, but because he wants to be convinced. 2mo
Leftcoastzen I think Mrs Sellar is tired of all this nonsense. 2mo
Leftcoastzen I think though he‘s all over the place with his feelings for Judith & Rose , he seems to really care about the children. Made me ponder people I know who I think would be great parents who never had kids & terrible parents who shouldn‘t have had them! 2mo
Graywacke @Leftcoastzen I wonder at how Wharton‘s own childlessness plays in. Martin is discovering how much he really wanted children. Whereas Rose doesn‘t betray emotions of this sort one way or the other. (Is Rose young enough to still have children?) (edited) 2mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I get the impression Rose is on the edge of being able to have kids, but it‘s just a feeling. I think Wharton is being much kinder to the children than to any of the adults, so you might have a point. 2mo
CarolynM Still lagging behind, I‘m afraid. Hopefully I‘ll catch up for the final discussion. 2mo
batsy After calling him creepy in the first section, this is the part that made me like and empathise with Martin. I think he's unsure about how he feels about Judith (and maybe some of those feelings are a tad dodgy), but I like that the narrative places the reader within his confusion and genuine care, so to speak. "The fact is, we're none of us grown up" and "hugging himself for being on the children's side of the eternal barrier" made me like him. 2mo
Lcsmcat @CarolynM Jump in whenever you can. I always like your insights. 2mo
Lcsmcat @batsy I get that. Martin is a bit of a Peter Pan, but I don‘t think that gives him license to mess up Judith‘s life. She obviously doesn‘t feel toward him that way, given her excitement at his engagement. And he would be just one more adult unsettling these kids‘ lives. 2mo
batsy @Lcsmcat Oh yes, the Peter Pan comparison is perfect. 2mo
29 likes18 comments
review
Lcsmcat
This Is Happiness | Niall Williams
post image
Pickpick

Soaked in symbolism and the most beautiful prose you can imagine, this lovely book is the opposite of a page-turner. It‘s a slow-down-and-savor, experience in all your senses kind of book. I loved it and wanted to highlight every other sentence. Highly recommend! Number13 for#24in2024 and my irl book club pick.

quote
Lcsmcat
The Children | Edith Wharton
post image

We get a little more of the Wharton bite in this Book. She‘s kinder to the children than to their parents. I was reminded of Pauline and her schedule (from Twilight Sleep) in the last section. Still, I don‘t know what to make of Martin. I don‘t think he‘s exactly being honest with himself regarding Judith. Thoughts? #whartonbuddyread

Currey @Lcsmcat Unlike others, I really thought that Martin would pull himself away from “liking” Judith after Book 1. I just didn‘t read it as that creepy. However, Wharton is clearly leading us to keep questioning his intentions and his motivations. So now I am thinking I read him incorrectly. 2mo
See All 20 Comments
Currey @Lcsmcat The children are more impossible and yet Wharton clearly makes their escape escapade seem totally reasonable given the state of their parents. 2mo
Currey @Lcsmcat And unfortunately Mrs Sellars is portrayed as very “staid” and I would have liked for one adult to be quite thoroughly upright AND likable (edited) 2mo
Lcsmcat @Currey Yes, I don‘t have much hope for Mrs. Sellers helping anything. She‘s more likely to be a complication. 2mo
arubabookwoman i agree that Martin is definitely heading toward creepy (and Mrs Sellars isn't discouraging that). And the parents and their cohorts are being portrayed as acting so badly as to be caricatures, and no longer based in reality. Despite this, I still like the book, and am going along with Wharton for the ride. (I have read this before). 2mo
batsy I had some hope in Mrs. Sellars when she meets Judith and says Judith is too young "for her responsibilities" because it's finally an adult seeing the truth but it didn't quite amount to much. I feel bad for these kids. This is a weird book (not a bad thing) but I'm just not sure what I make of it yet. 2mo
Lcsmcat @batsy I can‘t figure how Wharton is going to end this one. 2mo
Graywacke @batsy “it‘s a weird book” - borderline farce, no? But it hasn‘t crossed that line. The Lodi adults are both caricatures and a playful attack. 2mo
Graywacke Goodness, i still like foolish Martin and his manipulation by Judith. @Currey Mrs. Sellars is really disappointing. Why are they engaged if they don‘t like each other, but just have a friendly fondness? (They barely touch each other…or want to) Oh right, Wharton‘s characters don‘t communicate 🙂 2mo
Leftcoastzen I think Mrs. Sellers knows it‘s better to not get involved, she‘s “retired “ more or less. She and Martin , are they settling? I too , sense it‘s a question of them not ending up alone instead renewing a passion. Once Martin started advocating for the kids , Judith would see him as a lifeline. Is he too interested in Judith? We shall see. 2mo
Leftcoastzen And the parents! They want to see these kids now & then , show them off like little trophies, then put them down letting them fend for themselves, with meager hired help. No wonder the kids cling to each other. 2mo
cindyash @Leftcoastzen the parents may be caricatures, but while I think Wharton is having fun with them but I do believe theres a germ of truth in what she writes Ive taught childre of these kind of parents. so I wasnt really surprised

Martin is such an interesting character, you usually dont see men in this time getting involved so much with the children. I wonder if she has a person in mind like that
2mo
Leftcoastzen @cindyash I wondered too if Wharton knew a man like that . I keep thinking they are rich , why don‘t they just send them to boarding school, then I think about the stories about negative experiences in boarding school!🤨 2mo
batsy @Graywacke Yes, it's playing with the line of farce and social commentary. Hence the Twilight mood seems heightened here, a dash of Fitzgerald, but she dials it down with Martin's inner voice. 2mo
Lcsmcat @batsy I like “dash of Fitzgerald “ - very apt. Wharton seems to have turned a corner from criticizing the staid “old New York” to critiquing the newer rich. I agree that it is Martin‘s inner voice that grounds the story and keeps it from being farce. But he‘s also the most fully-realized character, with all the others more or less two dimensional which makes me wonder if she‘s actually doing more of a character study on him than 👇🏻 2mo
Lcsmcat 👆🏻 social commentary on the rich - nouveau or otherwise. 2mo
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen @cindyash I had the boarding school thought too. But the parents don‘t seem to value education enough to even warrant that much effort. 2mo
cindyash @Lcsmcat hee really not sure which book it is but one parent was shocked to find that Morroco wasnt in South Africa “well then where is it Id like to know“ 2mo
28 likes20 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
Dreamers of the Day: A Novel | Mary Doria Russell
post image

My #bookspin and #doublespin for May. Although the way this spring is going I may be lucky to finish just one. @TheAromaofBooks

TheAromaofBooks Yay!! Enjoy!! 3mo
30 likes1 stack add1 comment
blurb
Lcsmcat
Shakespeare: The Man Who Pays the Rent | Judi Dench, Brendan O'Hea
post image

My husband, who totally gets me, gifted my with a signed copy of the tagged book. So of course I put it on my #bookspin for May. 🙂

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 3mo
32 likes1 comment
blurb
Lcsmcat
The Children | Edith Wharton
post image

It took four chapters before the “nursery tangle” gets untangled, but at last, the cast of the title characters is revealed. What do you make of Judith? Martin? And the parents (when we finally meet them.) Wharton has addressed the neglect of the children of the rich as an aside in previous books, but I don‘t think she‘s going to let the adults off the hook in this one. #whartonbuddyread

Lcsmcat Two quotes that I marked: “The Wheaters he knew must have been married nearly twenty years ago; and Cliffe Wheater, in the interval, had made money enough to treat himself to half-a-dozen divorces and remarriages, with all the attendant outlay.” 3mo
See All 36 Comments
Lcsmcat “And yet he was disappointed, for he was already busy at the masculine task of endowing the woman of the moment with every quality which made life interesting to himself.” (Martin of Judith in the church.) 3mo
Suet624 I started this and then it got yanked away from me (Hoopla). I was fascinated by the cast of characters and was just getting the hang of them all. Hope to be able to get it back soon 3mo
Lcsmcat @Suet624 You almost need a chart, don‘t you? 3mo
Suet624 That would definitely be helpful. 😊 3mo
Currey @Lcsmcat I am also enjoying Mr Boyne. Because he has a bit of a crush on Judith he sees her maturity until they are in the cathedral where he realizes she isn‘t fully formed intellectually at all. He sees the children as individuals not just a gang and he largely sympathizes with them over the irresponsible adults 3mo
arubabookwoman i kept remembering Suzy and Nick in Glimpses of the Moon in the borrowed villa in which the daughter of the wealthy owner was abandoned while she was off on a fling. Wharton here is going to explore further the plight of the children of her wealthy dilettantes. Judith intrigues me. How did she become so mature and commensensical at such a young age, esp. with such parents--none of the younger children seems to have that trait. 3mo
arubabookwoman but it is great how Wharton has made each of the children individuals, with distinct personalities, even in the little bit we've seen of them so far. Was anyone else surprised that the young boy Terry was placed in a room with a complete stranger on the boat? And that once reunited with their parents the children were housed in a different hotel? (edited) 3mo
Lcsmcat @arubabookwoman I too thought of the little girl in Glimpses of the Moon. 3mo
Graywacke Just taking in names and relationships and trying to understand motives and wondering what it would be like being one of these kids cruising around Europe. Wharton seems to be having fun with charm and a maybe more resigned social critique. Martin isn‘t being honest with himself or his motivations. I did think it was funny when the nanny reveals to us that they‘re manipulating Martin. 3mo
Leftcoastzen The poor little rich girl/ boy idea comes to mind . The children are worldly in a way because they have been so many places though most would agree the attention & love from parents is so important and totally lacking. One of the kids said something that made me Lol early in the book. Should have written it down. 3mo
jewright I‘m sympathizing with poor Terry who just wants a tutor, so he can learn like other boys. I see irresponsible parents every day as a teacher. I‘m not sure if it‘s comforting or discouraging that they‘ve always existed. 3mo
Leftcoastzen And to Judith. The family is lucky to have her yet she has no opportunity to have had normal personal experiences as an individual adolescent & teen as she is all about caring for the little ones. 3mo
batsy There's a different quality to Wharton's writing here that I find interesting. Can't quite put my finger on it but it's reminding me of British middlebrow fiction (all the Furrowed Middlebrow imprint books :) There's a part of me that's cringing in earnest about Martin's obsession with Judith because of the age gap. Very icky. The part where Judith says she won't have time to read or do anything really because she'll have to care for the children! 3mo
batsy @arubabookwoman Yes! Good memory, because I'd forgotten about that until you brought it up 🙂 This does have some similarities in tone and mood to Moon. 3mo
Lcsmcat @batsy I‘m struggling to put my finger on the difference in Wharton‘s tone. Less biting maybe? I‘ll have to ponder this more. The potential for a Martin-Judith relationship has me cringing too, but it feels like maybe he‘s moving away from that and realizing how young she really is. 3mo
Lcsmcat @jewright Poor Terry! No one recognizes what he has to offer because he isn‘t what they expect him to be. But he‘s so self possessed and aware of what _he_ needs. I really like him. The “foreign” steps make me laugh, Zinnie is harder for me to like, but I‘m trying to keep an open heart. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen Judith has a bad bargain for sure. And you wonder if this kind of childhood leads to the selfish adult behavior. Kind of a “I didn‘t get to do these things as a kid so I‘m going to do them now” idea? 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat @batsy - on the writing - the less biting tone - I think much of Wharton‘s writing had ambitious intents - to establish her, to shock NY, to share her experiences, to look back on her history, to look at (and undermine?) her own optimism. But none of that is here. She‘s an established best-selling writer. She has pressed. Here she‘s indulging herself and experimenting on more subtle ways. This is my unedited thinking out loud. 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat @batsy on Martin and Judith - we have seen Wharton‘s courtships and they can begin this way, with no intent. No conscious admission of courting by either person. So she‘s playing hard with an improper relationship. Safe on the surface, but readers are thinking about it, whether we want to or not. It‘s weird… And I‘m pretty sure she wants us thinking about it, and to be a little uncomfortable. 3mo
Graywacke @arubabookwoman @Leftcoastzen @batsy @Lcsmcat What bothers me most about Judith is that everyone is ok with her fate and role. Terry needs a tutor, but Judith can just be nanny. Well, of course. I don‘t sense much tension there in writer or characters. (And why doesn‘t the nanny, you know, nanny? Shouldn‘t she take charge?) 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Oh she definitely wants us to think about a Martin - Judith relationship! (Thus the quote I posted above.) My question is whether or not Martin will be/become aware enough to leave her alone. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Judith has her hands full with more than the kids. She‘s got to manage the servants and they‘re taking advantage of the fact that their ostensible employers aren‘t interested in paying attention. And Judith seems resigned to her fate, doesn‘t she? It‘s almost like Terry‘s illness gave him power that none of the others have to just be himself. 3mo
Leftcoastzen @Lcsmcat @Graywacke I agree totally! As I read In my brain I‘m yelling the hired help needs to do their jobs!😄poor Judith managing that too. Families can be like that , giving no cares about Judith‘s fate & role. 3mo
Leftcoastzen I love how Wharton seems to find a character to feature that has an old association with someone & gets drawn into a hot mess like this. Martin is in over his head . 3mo
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen Good observation. Wharton does explore “loose ties” in a lot of her fiction. 3mo
TheBookHippie I like Judith. I too wondered if or what we are suppose yo be thinking. This feels like being told a story rather than in the story if that makes sense. It seems stage is set but for what? 3mo
Lcsmcat @TheBookHippie Interesting that you feel outside of the story. I feel like we‘re sort of in Martin‘s mind, but that he himself isn‘t as aware as he could be. Coming from the “wilderness” he is meant to see through the eyes of an outsider, but he‘s also an insider. 3mo
TheBookHippie @Lcsmcat I know -what does that say about me 😅 3mo
batsy @Lcsmcat @Graywacke Less biting for sure & I think @TheBookHippie nails it in terms of stage setting. It's early days yet but this first part still feels introductory. We get glimpses of the usual astute Wharton when she allows us into Martin's mind (Though I don't quite like all that I find in there! The idea of the moldable young woman; her innocence and lack of interest in what moves him, but caring for kids animates her. Yeah ok, Martin! 🤢) 3mo
batsy @Graywacke Agreed—the adults seem far too comfortable with how much Judith has to take on. 3mo
cindyash @arubabookwoman I was so surprised how well she drew those children! Wasnt expecting that somehow, Also showing Boyne to be so caring, . Quite the difference from the parents. Just awful people. 3mo
cindyash @Leftcoastzen yeah some one need to remind him the road to hell is paved with good intentions But what a wonderful thing he is doing? good role model for the kids. the parent could take a few lessons from him 3mo
Lcsmcat @cindyash She portrays the kids so lovingly in all their individuality that it makes me think Wharton must have known children like them. 3mo
21 likes36 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
The Children | Edith Wharton
post image

Quick reminder that discussions start next Saturday! #Whartonbuddyread

Graywacke Ok, ebook acquired. I‘ve started. 3mo
See All 20 Comments
IMASLOWREADER oh cool 3mo
CarolynM I‘ll try to join in, but I still haven‘t finished Twilight Sleep 😬 My reading is not what it should be. 3mo
batsy I haven't started but will try my best! 3mo
Currey @batsy @Lcsmcat Along with Betsy, I have not started but I did note that Book 1 is short. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Currey It is short, but so far the characters are intriguing. 3mo
Lcsmcat @TheBookHippie Thanks! I always forget about them for fiction. (I use them a lot for genealogy resources.) 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat - please add @cindyash to the tag list. Thanks 3mo
Graywacke @CarolynM i hope you‘re able to enjoy what you‘re reading. Twilight Sleep has a curious and maybe entertaining end. 3mo
Currey @batsy Apologies for the autocorrect changing your name to Betsy. When I went to fix it Litsy went down and I gave up. 3mo
batsy @Currey No worries at all, it's a username based on a silly nickname friends gave me in school 😆 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat hmm. My edition has a Book iv. Is it incorrect or do we need to adjust the schedule? Maybe add a week? 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I‘ll take a look when I get home from work, but I can certainly add another week. 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Yep. Don‘t know how I missed that, but we will add Book 4 on May 18. Good catch! 3mo
Graywacke @Lcsmcat Good solution. And glad I‘m not crazy. 🙂 3mo
29 likes20 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
This Is Happiness | Niall Williams
post image

Springtime and a good book. This is happiness. 😀

review
Lcsmcat
Angela's Ashes: A Memoir | Frank McCourt
post image
Pickpick

This was so popular when it came out (when my kids were in Catholic school.) But I‘m one to be wary of hype, and I put it off. But I shouldn‘t have. It‘s tragic, and funny, and very well written. Number 12 of #24in2024, and #bookspin for April. @TheAromaofBooks @Jas16

Amiable Such a fabulous book 3mo
BarbaraJean I‘ve been wanting to re-read this one! I read it during all the hype, and then picked up ‘Tis and Teacher Man over the years, because Angela‘s Ashes was so good. I still haven‘t read those other two, and feel like I need to circle back to this one before I do! 3mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo! 3mo
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean Both of the sequels are on my shelf. I‘m a little wary because often memoirs of childhood work when those from later years don‘t. So I‘ll be eager to see what you think of them. 3mo
43 likes4 comments
review
Lcsmcat
post image
Pickpick

Lisa See returns again and again to brutal stories of female friendships destroyed by misunderstanding. Every bit as difficult to read as Snow Flower, and as meticulously researched. I learned a lot about haenyeo and the fate of Korea before and after WWII. A pick for my irl book club, and number 11 for #24in2024.

blurb
Lcsmcat
The Children | Edith Wharton
post image

Good morning #whartonbuddyread! Are we ready for the Children? (Is anyone ever really ready for children? 😂) This one‘s just under 300 pages and divided into 3 books. I‘m proposing starting April 27 for Book 1, May 4 and 11 for books 2 & 3. Does that work for everyone?

arubabookwoman i'm looking forward to this one. It's typical Wharton in many ways, but a darker theme--how the children, of the rich adults we've seen so much of, fare, as they are dragged around the world, but basically ignored, with constantly changing step-parents and step siblings and half siblings. When I read it years ago there are parts that reminded me of Lolita, to the extent I wondered if Nabokov had it in mind. 3mo
See All 24 Comments
batsy Looking forward to it. Things are a bit hectic atm but I'll try my best to join in and keep to the schedule! 3mo
Lcsmcat @arubabookwoman Interesting thought. I‘ll keep that in the back of my mind as I read. 3mo
Lcsmcat @batsy Same here. What‘s up with this spring? 3mo
Graywacke Sounds good @Lcsmcat ! I‘ll likely be quiet May 4, traveling. But this schedule works for me. Wish you and @batsy RL breaks. 3mo
TheBookHippie Crazy busy but yes. 😵‍💫🙃 3mo
Currey Sounds okay to me. Thanks 3mo
batsy @Graywacke Thanks 🙂 3mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Thanks. Chime in when you can, and safe travels. 3mo
Suet624 I keep missing out on reading these. 🥴😫 3mo
Lcsmcat @Suet624 Join us this time! It‘s a shorter one. 3mo
Suet624 @Lcsmcat my problem lies in finding the book! Hoopla has it but I literally have to wake up at 2 am to grab it before the daily collective quota allowed for the entire library system is hit. It‘s weird. I‘ll try though. 🤨 3mo
Lcsmcat @Suet624 I have the entire works of Edith Wharton as an ebook that cost 1.99 (I think. It might have been .99) Or you could try Project Gutenberg. I‘m not sure if it‘s under copyright still or not. 3mo
Suet624 Shoot. I always forget about Project Gutenberg. I‘ll check that out now. 3mo
jewright I‘m in! 3mo
jewright @Suet624–I bought the Kindle complete works. It was pretty inexpensive and has had everything. 3mo
Suet624 @jewright Thanks! However, I don‘t use Kindle because it‘s owned by Amazon. I know…my little protest amounts to nothing really, but I try not to give amazon any money. 3mo
Lcsmcat @jewright Great! 3mo
CarolynM I will try to join in, but I was lagging behind on Twilight Sleep all the way and I still haven‘t finished, so I‘ll just have to see how I‘m going at the end of the month🙂 3mo
Leftcoastzen I will try to keep up this time . 3mo
39 likes1 stack add24 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
Angela's Ashes: A Memoir | Frank McCourt
post image

Enjoying the mild weather while it lasts, I‘m starting my #bookspin outside with an adult beverage and dried veggies.

43 likes1 stack add
review
Lcsmcat
The Bingo Palace | Louise Erdrich
post image
Pickpick

Like @Centique said, this is not my favorite of the Love Medicine novels. Many characters are difficult to love, and there is less humor and more relentless depression. But I did love Fleur‘s final act. And I think I know what happened with Lipsha, but would love to discuss with anyone else who has read this. Number 10 for #24in2024 @Jas16

Jas16 Still haven‘t read this one. I need to. 4mo
Centique Im glad someone else has read this book! Whats your theory about Lipsha? 4mo
Lcsmcat @Centique I‘m wondering if she meant us to think he got away with it by being perceived as his father‘s hostage. 🤷🏻‍♀️ 4mo
Centique @Lcsmcat oh i like that theory. I was wondering if theyd all died because he saw his mothers ghost again - but i much prefer thinking he got out of there 4mo
31 likes4 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
Untitled | Untitled
post image

Sharing my April #bookspin now because Holy Week is about to get crazy-busy. I can‘t believe it‘s almost April! @TheAromaofBooks

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 4mo
28 likes1 comment
review
Lcsmcat
post image
Pickpick

I finished this on the treadmill this morning and it was a fascinating look at the gilded age and beyond. Told with love but not with blinders on, Cooper explores the faults and foibles, the triumphs and traumas, as he explores the rise and fall of the Vanderbilt dynasty. A nice companion to the #WhartonBuddyRead as it covers some of the same ground. A nice touch was the epilogue where he tells what stands now where the mansions once were.

review
Lcsmcat
post image
Pickpick

I devoured this book. Part genealogical mystery, part loving mémoire, part philosophy of war and empire, it was shot through with Palin‘s intelligence and humor. Thanks to my cousin @barbwire for a lovely birthday present.

review
Lcsmcat
Dear Carolina | Kristy Woodson Harvey
post image
Panpan

This book has more similes than a 9th grade English assignment on descriptive writing, and if I had to read one more “I think I‘m southern if I can‘t say a sentence without some goofy expression” page I would have exploded like a too-ripe watermelon dropped from the back of the truck on a bumpy road heading to market. Sheesh!
Read Flannery O‘Connor - skip this one. #24in2024 number 9 also #doublespin

willaful 🤣 4mo
45 likes1 comment
blurb
Lcsmcat
Memphis | Robert W. Dye
post image

My birthday was full of books (and grandson. And Six!) The little book on the bottom is the tagged book.

LeahBergen Happy birthday! ❤️ 4mo
Lcsmcat @LeahBergen Thank you! 4mo
Ruthiella Happy Birthday! 🥳🥳🥳 4mo
See All 15 Comments
Graywacke Happy birthday! 🙂 4mo
Lcsmcat @Ruthiella Thanks! 4mo
Lcsmcat @Graywacke Thanks! I‘m 60 pages in on the Michael Palin book already and I highly recommend it. 4mo
Aimeesue HBD! 4mo
TheSpineView Happy Birthday! 4mo
Lcsmcat @TheSpineView Thank you! 4mo
Leftcoastzen Happy Birthday!🎁🎂🎉 4mo
batsy Happy birthday! 🎈🎂📚 Great stack 😍 4mo
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen Thank you. 4mo
Lcsmcat @batsy Thanks. Have you read any of them? 4mo
batsy No. I've had Miss Jane on my tbr for awhile and am keen about the Worsley, as well! I'm pretty sure you'll get to both before I do 😆 4mo
51 likes15 comments
review
Lcsmcat
Fulton | Elizabeth R. Jones
post image
Pickpick

N J (Newton Julian) Paschall was my great-great grandfather and it was fun to read about his contributions to the town of Fulton. The Images of America series isn‘t particularly careful in its research, but they always have good pictures.

Graywacke Cool! 4mo
Hooked_on_books That‘s so cool! 4mo
40 likes2 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
Dune | Frank Herbert
post image

So relatable!

SpellboundReader 😃👍 4mo
38 likes1 comment