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Lcsmcat
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“He wanted to be where no one would know who he was. He wanted to escape from himself.” #fugitive #quotsymay19 @TK-421

jewright Love this book! 12h
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Lcsmcat
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As you read Book 3, #hugonuts, here‘s an image of the façade and here is a link to a swallow‘s eye view of medieval Paris: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NbETq6owNmc. It‘s not totally accurate of course, but it‘s fun. Happy reading!

tournevis It's a good vid, but the problem is 1) it depicts Paris about 250 years after the novel takes place 2) Hugo was just riffing for the most part. So inaccuracy is not a problem! 1d
Lcsmcat @tournevis Yeah, the spire on the cathedral was a bit of a giveaway. 😀 1d
tournevis @Lcsmcat It yad been imagined... 😁 1d
37 likes3 comments
review
Lcsmcat
Stone Mattress: Nine Tales | Margaret Atwood
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Pickpick

(Reusing the photo because the cat has me pinned down again.) Nine stories, the first three, connected, were my favorites. One features characters from The Robber Bride, the rest are stand alone. All are well written, slightly creepy/sinister but in a “what lengths will humans go to” way rather than a slasher in the basement way. I like that many of the protagonists are older - there‘s a lot of exploration of what does & doesn‘t change as we age.

45 likes1 stack add
blurb
Lcsmcat
Stone Mattress: Nine Tales | Margaret Atwood
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I‘ve got a bug that‘s keeping me home from church this morning, so Balthazar and I are getting some quality time in with Ms. Atwood. #currentlyreading #littenkitten #catsoflitsy

Leftcoastzen Hope you feel better soon! At least you have a cat nurse. 3d
Graywacke Hoping you feel better...glad you‘re able to read through it, though. 3d
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen @Graywacke Thanks. It‘s not bad, I just cough a lot and can‘t sing. I‘m babying myself so I‘ll be up to snuff for the wedding, and Balthazar is taking advantage of the cuddle time. 3d
56 likes1 stack add3 comments
review
Lcsmcat
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Pickpick

I finally finished these stories. (I‘m not driving as much anymore.) They are uneven, but none of them are bad - it‘s a pick. I would definitely read more by her.

Lcsmcat @DivineDiana How‘d you like it? 4d
DivineDiana I read it years ago, so it is not fresh in my memory. Rated it ⭐️⭐️⭐️ on Goodreads, but there were many positive reviews! 4d
Lcsmcat @DivineDiana I‘ll check it out. 4d
51 likes4 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
Who Can Be Happy and Free in Russia? | Nikolai Alekseevich Nekrasov
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This is what my Gutenberg “covers” look like @tournevis Since I read a lot of “old books” I get lots from Gutenberg. If I ever retire I think I might volunteer with them to scan and edit books.

Riveted_Reader_Melissa That sounds like a great volunteer project! 4d
DrexEdit I‘ve thought about doing that too! There‘s also Librivox which has volunteers recording public domain audiobooks for free distribution. 4d
Lcsmcat @DrexEdit I‘ve listened to some of them, but have never been tempted there. 4d
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Lcsmcat
Notre Dame de Paris | Victor Hugo
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#HugoNuts Show us your cover(s)! I love all the different covers on older books that have many editions. On the left are my English editions (Krailsheimer and Hapgood translations) and on the upper right my eBook French, lower right hardback (in two volumes, but as small as a paperback.)

Lcsmcat Next week is catch-up week so I can play Mother-of-the-Bride, but I‘ll be on here whenever I need to retreat from too much people. (6 adults & a 3 yr old in a 2.5 bath house!) (edited) 4d
jmtrivera Thank goodness there's a catch up week! I haven't been able to read at all this week, and I hate that I'm already so far behind! 4d
tournevis I, in fact, don't own it in paper. I read my father's Folio edition, about a hundred thousand years ago but I have the Project Gutenberg ebook. 4d
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Lcsmcat @tournevis Three of mine are eBooks too. That‘s why the cover on the Oxford edition is so weird. 😀 4d
Lcsmcat @jmtrivera Hey, life happens. You can always add your 2 cents whenever you are able. 4d
jewright I‘m reading it on Serial Reader. 4d
48 likes6 comments
review
Lcsmcat
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Pickpick

I don‘t know how this would hold up for the average Millennial, but for this baby boomer it was a nostalgic treat. I miss her sharp observations and wit that is razor sharp but never mean-spirited. We lost her too soon and journalism is a poorer place for it. RIP Molly.

DrexEdit Molly Ivins was one of the good ones. She literally got me through my years of living in Texas. I miss her too! 4d
38 likes1 comment
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Lcsmcat
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Change a few names and this column, written in 1987, would work today. 🙄

Chrissyreadit It amazes me that there is no division of understanding of politics as a power play and politics as a civic duty and that people are not furious or recognizing that civic duty and civic responsibility are the only meaning it should have- and if that is not the goal those people must go. Also that by not discussing politics we are not engaging in decisions that effect our lives. 5d
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theresidentromantic I don't even think that you need to change names. Reagan is ever present right now, like some kind of ideal American standard. He's the reason we have under God in the pledge of allegiance. He is omnipresent in the effect he's had on these blurred church and state lines we have and I think this makes a good point. 5d
Lcsmcat @theresidentromantic Actually Dwight D. Eisenhower is the president responsible for adding that phrase in 1954. But I agree that the ghost of Reagan is leading certain politicians, particularly in the blurring of the church / state line. (edited) 5d
GingerAntics Wow. Yes it could. Sheesh. 4d
theresidentromantic @Lcsmcat Thank you! I always thought it was Reagan, I should read a little more non fiction! 4d
Lcsmcat @GingerAntics It actually gives me hope in a weird way to be reminded of how apocalyptic we thought Nixon and Reagan we‘re back in the day, and yet we‘re still ultimately moving in the right direction. 4d
GingerAntics Fingers crossed we make it out of this particular presidency (and it doesn‘t become a kingship). 4d
38 likes9 comments
blurb
Lcsmcat
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And continuing the good versus evil conversation: What about Frollo? Does he deserve Quasimodo‘s devotion? #hugonuts

Graywacke Ok, when I figured out that the guy who saved Gingoire and the guy who called Esmerelda a witch were the same one, I was a little confused. Frollo is still a mystery to me. Also, the Quasimodo-Frollo relationship is a mystery. Intrigued. Keep in mind this is my first time reading this. 6d
tournevis A pic of Daniel Lavoie on Litsy! Wow. 6d
rjsthumbelina Honestly, so far I cant stand this guy! I don't care what good things he might have done. I just keep picturing the old lady (is it from Princess Bride?) who stands off to the side yelling, "Boo!" I don't think he deserves Quasimodo's devotion, even if he saved him. 6d
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tournevis In this book, in all his books, Hugo is passing judgement on Man and Society. Here, on the Catholic Church as a corrupting institution and on Man as a corruptible creature (Man being male, of course, it's Hugo; lust and all). All the men in this book Fall to an extent, all fail, as both the Church and the church fall. The only exception is the least humanly of them all, Quasimodo, who remains pure of heart. 6d
Lcsmcat @tournevis Lavoie was an excellent Frollo! Just the right amount of creepy mixed with inner torment. 6d
tournevis @Lcsmcat I'll give you that. I've heard the songs so many times now that I can no longer stand any of it. 6d
suvata @Graywacke I agree that Frollo is a mystery at this point. I‘m holding judgement until I read a little further. 5d
GingerAntics Straight up, no. Frollo is the real monster of this story (so far). 5d
BarbaraJean @suvata I‘m with you on withholding judgment! I feel like I haven‘t seen enough of him to know yet. But as far as Quasimodo‘s devotion, it seemed so blind and servile to me—big red flag! Blind devotion to me indicates a power relationship, not one of charity and gratitude. 4d
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean Good point about the red flag of servility. I wanted to point out that Frollo has (had?) generous actions as well, because I think caricature villains let us off the hook. I think Hugo is pointing out that no one is all bad or all good. 4d
BarbaraJean @Lcsmcat Agreed. There‘s a lot of complexity and ambiguity going on here. I‘m interested to see more of Frollo. 4d
janeycanuck @Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean the devotion is troubling - and I can‘t help but wonder how this is going to turn out for Quasimodo given Frollo‘s other actions. It feels like we are being set up for a big conflict between Quasimodo and his devotion to Frollo and doing what he thinks is right. Even if Frollo does have good in him, there‘s something a bit “methinks he doth protest too much” about him, if that makes sense. 4d
janeycanuck @rjsthumbelina this is perfect!! 4d
41 likes14 comments
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Lcsmcat
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A different artist‘s vision of Gringoire being brought before Clopin at the Court of Miracles. What do you think Hugo is saying (through Clopin and Esmeralda) about good and evil? Does this section remind you of Charles Dickens‘ work? #hugonuts

Graywacke Dickens - well, I‘ve only read one. 😔Yes, lot of hopeless neglected poor, but with more focus on humor...and more celebratory of the poor. The initial descriptions of the tavern reminded me of the cantina in Mos Eisley on Tatooine... 6d
Graywacke About a good and evil...hmm. Not sure yet. 6d
Lcsmcat @Graywacke OK, I‘ll bite - which Dickens? (I went to your profile and couldn‘t find it) 😀 6d
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rjsthumbelina It is totally giving me Dickens vibes. Yes, I think that Hugo is definitely making a statement about good and evil. He seems to be pointing to the fact that the lines are blurred and it's isn't as easy as saying that the religious person is good bc they are religious, and the gypsy isn't bad bc they are a gypsy. I wonder how that was received when it was written? 6d
Graywacke @Lcsmcat i think this was his last one, but my first and, so far, only. (I did like it). 6d
Graywacke @rjsthumbelina curious what he‘s saying about Frollo... good or evil? 6d
suvata Ah, Dickens! Now that you mention it ... 5d
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I was thinking more Oliver Twist than Mutual Friend. Dickens did get darker in his later works. 5d
Graywacke @Lcsmcat oh, right. OMF is not ideal for this conversation. Only in that the old Dickens used the poor the gain our sympathy, whereas this young Hugo is making them out to be a culture of conmen (conpeople?), useful for humor. (I don‘t anything about OT except whatever movie version my parents sat me down in front of...☺️) 5d
GingerAntics I‘ve never been able to get very far into Dickens. I‘ve had it read to me, but reading myself really pointed out what a hot mess is mile long sentences are. Ugh. My translation of Hugo avoids that. Not sure what his original writing looks like. I think Hugo is just showing the different levels of society and the subcultures that come from that. I find it interesting that the two decent characters are the ones rejected by all parts of society. 5d
BarbaraJean I like the Dickens comparison with the Court of Miracles! I can see the Oliver Twist vibe, but I feel like Dickens‘ tone was different—more caricatured characters, and perhaps more comic? I feel like Hugo‘s tone is harsher than Dickens. There‘s villainy portrayed in Dickens, but it feels less serious somehow. 4d
BarbaraJean @rjsthumbelina That‘s a great point about Hugo‘s reversal of expectations—good gypsy, bad religious person. I feel like he‘s doing a little of that with class/wealth as well (not all poor are bad). I was struck by how in the Court of Miracles, it seems beauty=good (Esmeralda) and ugly=bad (Clopin). But I don‘t think that holds true elsewhere in the book—so far Quasimodo is the example of ugliness, but his “moral” portrayal has been less clear-cut. 4d
Lcsmcat @rjsthumbelina @BarbaraJean Even though the prejudices of his day sometimes come through, I think Hugo is trying to express a world view that is more compassionate than the norm. 4d
janeycanuck @Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean @rjsthumbelina I‘ve only read a bit of Dickens but given the time period they were writing in, I think both of them are trying to offer some commentary on treatment of the poor, etc. For Hugo, he was writing not long after the French Revolution which was all about equality, pushing out religion, etc. So it‘s really interesting that our main religious figure so far is “bad” and our good characters all seem to be outcasts. 4d
41 likes14 comments
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Lcsmcat
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I loved Ivins‘ column when it was syndicated in the 80‘s, but I wasn‘t sure if the humor would hold up. It does. I‘m enjoying this nostalgically. You don‘t have to be from Texas, but a bit of knowledge about the Reagan Bush 1 years is helpful. #currentread

Leftcoastzen She was marvelous.Miss her so much. 6d
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen Me too. I‘d love to read what she would have come up with on our current political situation. 6d
Theaelizabet I used to laugh out loud when I read her books. There‘s a documentary being made of her life. Boy, she left such a void. 6d
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Lcsmcat
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I can‘t remember which volume this is from, but Billy Collins is my all-time favorite poet. #silence #poetrymatters @TheSpineView @LazyDays

TheSpineView 🤩 7d
39 likes1 comment
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Lcsmcat
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I‘m all caught up on my buddy reads, which are all rereads right now, so I‘m going to start this. I can‘t believe I‘ve waited this long to read it. #currentlyreading

Jerdencon This is one of my favorite plays of all time! 1w
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Lcsmcat
A Midsummer Night’s Dream | Shakespeare William
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Oberon and Titania and their verbal battles! Arguing over a little boy. What‘s the emoji for shaking my head?#shakespearereadalong @merelybookish

merelybookish That's fun that the little boy is behind Titania's leg! I do find their sparring so beautifully written! All those insults wrapped in the language of nature and myths. 6d
Lcsmcat @merelybookish I don‘t know who the artist is, but I think this is in the National Museum in Scotland. 6d
merelybookish @Lcsmcat Oberon's jealousy makes me think the boy is older but this picture shows he's still little. Makes Oberon seem even more like a jerk. 5d
Lcsmcat @merelybookish Yes. I took it that Oberon wasn‘t jealous in a sexual/romantic way, but in a possessive way. The child was a toy he wanted and Titania wouldn‘t give to him. Neither of them seems to regard him as a sentient being. 5d
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Lcsmcat
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How is everyone liking Book 2? I think Hugo is even funnier in this section. Poor Gringoire. #hugonuts

suvata I‘m really enjoying Hugo‘s dry wit. I agree that Book II had more humorous moments. 1w
EleniKara I am definitely enjoying Book II, and how we are getting a lot from outside POVs form what we can assume are the main players (aka Quasimodo, Esmeralda, Frollo etc) also Gringoire is sUCH A DRAMA QUEEN in the best sort of way 😂😂 1w
Graywacke Been busy with Cather. ☺️ Will start book ii tomorrow. 7d
Graywacke Started this am. Yes, poor Gringoire. Curious Quasimodo and Frollo (and his witchery). Wait - was that Esmerelda? I don‘t know yet. Fun stuff. 6d
Graywacke @EleniKara Your comment on Gringoire as a drama queen made my smile. 🙂 6d
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Lcsmcat
The Courtesy | Alan Shapiro
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TheSpineView 💜💜 1w
32 likes1 comment
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Lcsmcat
The Song of the Lark | Willa Cather
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Reading the middle chapters of Part 1 sent me to YouTube to listen to Orpheus and Eurydice. #catherbuddyread @Graywacke

Graywacke Cool 1w
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Lcsmcat
Merchant of Venice | William Shakespeare
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Lcsmcat
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TheSpineView That's an interesting poem. 😊 1w
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Lcsmcat
The Song of the Lark | Willa Cather
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More strong intelligent women. #catherbuddyread

batsy A little further on there's a description of her raising her children with discipline but not wanting to control their minds, and I loved that. 1w
Caterina Yes I love her so much from the descriptions so far!! 1w
Lcsmcat @batsy Yes! There‘s much about her to admire. 1w
Graywacke I like the next few lines too! I‘m enjoying her characters and all their complexities. Her quiet take downs of Dr. Archie and Mr Kronborg. 1w
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review
Lcsmcat
Lucky Jim | Kingsley Amis
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Pickpick

I think I would have liked this book better if 1) I were a man; 2) I had read it a few decades ago; and, 3) if I hadn‘t read the hype. Being told that something is the “finest, and funniest, comic novel of the twentieth century” makes one expect more. There were certainly amusing moments, but there was so much sophomoric humor, and deep cynicism, mixed with a dose of misogyny, that I could only give it 3 stars. OK, but not genius.

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Lcsmcat
Lucky Jim | Kingsley Amis
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“to say of him now that he looked like an artist of some sort would have been true without being too offensive.” 🤣
This is supposed to be a really funny book. I‘m not finding it that funny most of the time, but this is a great comedic line.

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Lcsmcat
Dracula | Bram Stoker
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Lcsmcat
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TheSpineView 😊 2w
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Lcsmcat
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Of course I listened to a few more stories as I did the grocery shopping this morning. Emma Gregory‘s narration is very good. She almost sounds like she‘s whispering, drawing you in. Like an excellent bedtime story, but not soporific, if that makes sense.

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Lcsmcat
Verses and Sonnets | Hilaire Belloc
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TheSpineView 💜 2w
36 likes1 comment
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Lcsmcat
Lucky Jim | Kingsley Amis
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Sometimes I buy books for their beautiful bindings, but only if I intend to read them. Diving in to this one tonight.

Leftcoastzen Lovely! 2w
Reviewsbylola Gorgeous! 2w
LeahBergen So pretty! 😍 2w
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen @Reviewsbylola @LeahBergen Thanks! I buy a lot of my books secondhand and always like finding pretty bindings. 2w
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Lcsmcat
The Challenge | Tom Hoyle
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Two new Billys in our library! #challengeAccepted

wanderinglynn 😍😍😍 looks great! I love sorting books. ❤️ 2w
Leftcoastzen Love that new bookcase smell! 2w
Lcsmcat @wanderinglynn Thanks! I may have room to do some organizing, if I don‘t rush out and buy more books. 😉 2w
Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen Yes, and the chance to look through my books again. 2w
Leftcoastzen 👍That‘s always great !Most of us have buried treasure in our collections. 2w
58 likes5 comments
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Lcsmcat
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I started this on the drive to Chapel Hill this morning. The first story is excellent.

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Lcsmcat
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The name Quasimodo came from the Latin text of the traditional Introit for the day after Easter, which begins "Quasi modo geniti infantes..." from 1 Peter 2:2,[1] roughly translated as "As newborn babes [desire the rational milk without guile]...".Literally, quasi modo means "as if in [this] manner".
We‘ve met Quasimodo - how did he compare to your expectations of him?
#hugonuts

tournevis It's not much like in the movies, isn't it? 2w
Graywacke Hmm. Wasn‘t sure what to expect. I think maybe I expected him to be more shy. ?? 2w
Lcsmcat @Graywacke I think a lot of retellings portray him that way. But his anger and resentment are more understandable to me. 2w
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BookwormAHN What a name. I was also expecting him to be more shy @Graywacke 2w
jmtrivera I just got my copy from the library, so I'll catch up to you guys soon! 2w
Lcsmcat @jmtrivera It‘s a faster read than you think. 2w
EleniKara I do really like the characterization of his resentment, makes sense considering his treatment and how that would understandably affect a persons perception, and like to sort of compare this version so far from all the subsequent versions and changes: 2w
BarbaraJean It‘s so interesting to read the source for his name! I feel like I haven‘t seen enough of him to form much of an impression/comparison yet. I have to say that I greatly enjoyed the fact that he just picks up the scholar who laughs in his face, and silently throws the guy into the crowd. 2w
jewright I was just surprised it took so long for him to show up. I kept waiting for him. His character is pretty much what I was expecting. 2w
Lcsmcat @jewright He really isn‘t the main character- the cathedral is. But because they changed the title when it was translated into English (I think because a publisher feared buyers would think it a religious book) English speakers expect him to be the protagonist. 2w
rjsthumbelina @Lcsmcat that's so interesting! I had no idea that the title was changed for English translations. It makes a lot of sense with what we have read so far, though. I was surprised that he wasn't MORE angry and resentful, considering how he was being treated! I really liked his description, but wanted to be allowed inside his head a bit more, like we have been with some other characters 2w
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean That is a wonderful moment, isn‘t it? 2w
Graywacke Off topic, but for what it‘s worth, while I was reading I was thinking about the atmosphere Hugo creates and the pacing. How in this event he constantly he brings everything to a halt without the book losing any energy but instead just building more atmosphere. 2w
Lcsmcat @Graywacke That‘s a great observation. What, in less talented hands, could be a digression in Hugo‘s is building the story and placing the reader in the 15th century. 2w
suvata I was highly anticipating the appearance of Quasimodo and Hugo did not disappoint. Hugo‘s description was so much better than any visual I have seen of Quasimodo - nothing like the old movie or book covers. 1w
suvata @Lcsmcat totally agree - it‘s so interesting that I am cruising right through it 1w
janeycanuck @Graywacke yes! I‘m loving this aspect, it‘s making the story just come alive for me and I wasn‘t expecting it to be so atmospheric. 1w
janeycanuck I haven‘t seen any movies (I probably half-saw the Disney one while babysitting) so I had no expectations of Quasimodo going in. I‘m looking forward to getting to know him better! 1w
Graywacke @janeycanuck He‘s wordy, and flamboyant, but does a lot with those words. Yeah, unexpected...lots of surprises. 1w
50 likes19 comments
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Lcsmcat
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We haven‘t “met” the cathedral yet, but what do you think of Hugo‘s focus on architecture? Map is medieval and modern Île-de-la-cité, with the Palais de Justice at one end and Nôtre Dame at the other. #hugonuts
(I‘m at class without my list, so I‘ll tag people after lunch.)

tournevis As you certainly figured out, the medieval map is not meant to be accurate and only shows the buildings considered important. They are bigger than life and the other buildings are absent or kept small. That's normal. As for the Quai des Orfèvres buildings, none of the medieval builds still exist per se, though extant buildings have older, usually 15th c. parts in their structures 2w
Lcsmcat @tournevis I think of it as like one of those tourist maps that makes the sightseeing places larger than scale. 2w
tournevis @Lcsmcat Not a bad comparison actually 2w
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Graywacke Love maps. Hugo enjoyed capturing the visuals...I guess I enjoyed his enthusiasm. 2w
BookwormAHN I think the scale is pretty accurate with the story. 2w
GingerAntics I always love medieval maps. They‘re as much art as map. 2w
TheBookHippie I am also a lover of maps!!!! 2w
TheBookHippie As a lover of architecture this adds a new layer of wanting to read more for me. 2w
BarbaraJean Love the medieval map! It was interesting to me to read Hugo‘s comment on how he needed to give a detailed description of the Grand Salle of the old Palais de Justice because of the fire in which it was destroyed. Kind of an uncanny parallel to the Notre Dame fire! 2w
Lcsmcat @BarbaraJean Definitely! And I believe he wrote the book to build support for rebuilding the cathedral, because in his day it was falling apart. 2w
suvata I‘m going to love reading about the architecture. That‘s what fascinated me most with The Pillars of the Earth trilogy by Ken Follett. 2w
rjsthumbelina At first, I hated the constant talk about architecture. But now I‘m enjoying it a lot more. It‘s interesting how it is central to the plot so far to understand what the building the characters are in looks and feels like 2w
Lcsmcat I felt like Hugo‘s focus on the sights and sounds of the place, architecture as well as people, enabled me to feel like I was there. 2w
MellieAntoinette I just love Victor Hugo. I don‘t think he gets enough credit for just be an incredible writer. 2w
Lcsmcat @MellieAntoinette Yes! He reminds me of Thomas Hardy, in that he was so prolific, wrote poetry as well as novels, and his themes are timeless. 2w
janeycanuck What a beautiful map!! I love the rich detail about the architecture, it makes the setting another character to fall in love with!! 1w
janeycanuck I‘ve been listening to an audio version - I‘ve just finished my second listen to this past week‘s reading because I felt really confused by the first chapter initially. A second listen really helped. I had planned on trying two different narrator/translator combinations but the one narrator was so overly dramatic that I abandoned him about 15 minutes in. I‘ve ended up settling on the Alger translation. 1w
Lcsmcat @janeycanuck I agree on the 2nd go round. This is a reread for me and I‘m noticing all kinds of things I missed the first time. 1w
janeycanuck @Lcsmcat I‘m pretty sure I‘ll read it again in print not long after we finish it as a group. 1w
43 likes19 comments
review
Lcsmcat
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Pickpick

The premise sounds like it could be either sappy or depressing. It is neither. Though there is no character that I would want to invite to dinner (except maybe Maggie) they were complex, interesting people dealing with complicated relationships.

Cathythoughts Nice review! I see I have it stacked. Must move it up the line ♥️👍🏻 2w
Lcsmcat @Cathythoughts Thanks. I hope you enjoy it! 2w
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Lcsmcat
Invitation to Madrigals | Orlando Gibbons
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I doubt this is the right book, but it‘s the right author/composer. I love how he turns the image at the end. 🦢 #swan #poetrymatters @TheSpineView

Lynnsoprano Have you listened to it? It‘s absolutely beautiful. 2w
Lcsmcat @Lynnsoprano I know more of his sacred and instrumental music than his secular songs, but I‘ll look it up. 2w
TheSpineView Beautiful! 💝 2w
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Lcsmcat
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Lcsmcat
Collected Poems | Edna St. Vincent Millay
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TheSpineView 😊 2w
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Lcsmcat
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“Anything that was not about a girl‘s love for her horse.” 😂

jewright I remember refusing to read anymore books about horses. Black Beauty was so traumatic! 2w
Lcsmcat @jewright When I was about 12 my mother and I were waiting somewhere and she didn‘t have a book with her. I offered her mine, about a girl who loses her horse, and Mom said she‘d rather not because the girl would just get the horse back. 2w
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Lcsmcat
A Midsummer Night's Dream | William Shakespeare
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“You have her father‘s love, Demetrius; let me have Hermia‘s: do you marry him.”
The first quote that made me laugh out loud. #shakespearereadalong @merelybookish

merelybookish Nice! I love them as flappers! And the wordplay is that scene was great! 2w
Lcsmcat @merelybookish I can‘t take credit for the illustration- I found it online. But I‘d love to see a production done this way! 2w
jewright I love this line! 2w
rabbitprincess This line makes me laugh too, every time I read it 😂 2w
batsy This made me LOL, too! I very much enjoyed the first act. 2w
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Lcsmcat
Insomnia Diary | Bob Hicok
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I‘m in class all this week, so this will serve two prompts. #spirit #breath(e) #poetrymatters #quotsymay19 @TheSpineView @TK-421

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Stacking! 💙it! 2w
Lcsmcat @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I need to read more of his work too! 2w
TheSpineView 🤣 2w
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Lcsmcat
Notre Dame de Paris | Victor Hugo
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For those who know a little French, and know that “poetry” doesn‘t translate. 😆 #hugonuts

tournevis Nope, not at all! 😋 2w
GingerAntics And yet they sometimes make us translate it for proficiency exams. It‘s always fun to find a native speaker to try to explain it so we can compare. 😂 2w
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Lcsmcat
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Starting this today. I hope the rabbit‘s face isn‘t indicative of things to come. 😁🐇

Texreader That is a scary rabbit 2w
Lcsmcat @Texreader I‘m only 60 some pages in, but so far Rabbit is sweet. 2w
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Lcsmcat
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My current #audiobook. Anyone else read this? I think it‘s a #blameitonlitsy, but I can‘t remember who posted it.

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Lcsmcat
Complete Poems | Andrew Marvell
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Lcsmcat
The Box Garden | Carol Shields
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Pickpick

“It occurs to me that there are some happenings for which the proper response is not comprehension at all, but amazement and acceptance.” I love Shields‘ writing! This book did not disappoint.

Nute I‘ve experienced lack of comprehension and abundance of amazement with many conversations, revelations and happenings. 2w
Lcsmcat @Nute Right? She nails it. 2w
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Lcsmcat
The Box Garden | Carol Shields
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This rings so true for me! (But not for the same reasons as in the book.)

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Lcsmcat
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On the “putting our house back together” front, we hung pictures today! Not as exciting as going to the library sale, which I really need to skip this year in favor of reading some of the books I already own, but fun nonetheless. 😀

Emilymdxn The pictures look amazing! Lovely to have pictures you love on the walls 3w
wanderinglynn Your walls look lovely! Hanging pictures really do make a space. 3w
Lcsmcat @wanderinglynn @emilymdxn Thanks! It really does make it feel more cozy. 3w
Nute Looks warm and inviting! 2w
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Lcsmcat
Romeo and Juliet | William Shakespeare
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kspenmoll 💕💕💕 3w
TaciturnWhenReading One of my absolute favorites! 3w
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Lcsmcat
Wuthering Heights | Emily Brontë
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“I gave him my heart, and he took and pinched it to death; and flung it back to me. People feel with their hearts, Ellen, and since he has destroyed mine, I have not power to feel for him.” #rejection #quotsymay19 @TK-421

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Lcsmcat
The Box Garden | Carol Shields
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My next read. #carolshields

ReadingOver50 Looks interesting 3w
Lcsmcat @ReadingOver50 I usually like her writing, so I have high hopes. 3w
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Lcsmcat
Pachinko | Min Jin Lee
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This book is amazing. My only regret is that I waited this long to read it. Epic in scope, but eminently readable. If you haven‘t read it yet, don‘t wait! (Gratuitous and 30-some year old photo of my nephew.)

GingerAntics He was a cutie!!! I‘m sure he‘s a handsome young man now. 3w
Leftcoastzen I thought it was a wonderful book. 3w
Lcsmcat @GingerAntics He is! I posted a more recent picture of him about a year ago on 3w
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Lcsmcat @Leftcoastzen Me too! And full of great characters. 3w
GingerAntics He‘s smile is still very much like it is in this picture, though. 3w
Lcsmcat @GingerAntics His sense of mischief hasn‘t changed either. 😀 3w
GingerAntics I love when that happens. 3w
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