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The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America
The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America | Richard Rothstein
"Rothstein has presented what I consider to be the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation." William Julius Wilson In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that Americas cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregationthat is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregationthe laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governmentsthat actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north. As Jane Jacobs established in her classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, Rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods. While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the postWorld War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Finally, Rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. The American landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book (Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund), as Rothsteins invaluable examination shows that only by relearning this history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past.
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/eitc-audit

Wow, check out this article @BarbaraTheBibliophage This fits right in with The Color of Law and The New Jim Crow...race isn‘t a factor (of course 🙄) but guess who is audited the most? The very poor who claim the Earned Tax Income Credit. Why? Well we wouldn‘t want the poor stealing a tax credit, plus they are least likely to afford legal help for audits. And surprise, who gets audited (cont.)

Riveted_Reader_Melissa ... the most, poor black communities in the south. Shocking right, you‘d think it be rich companies that claim huge tax credits and write offs, but nope. 🤯🤬 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa * By the way, I saw this on Twitter, because an author I follow posted it, and Science Fiction author...NKJemisi n 5mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘m tellin‘ ya ... it makes me mad ... 🤬🤯😡🤬😡🤯 5mo
lele1432 Even if you were to ignore the obvious race and class implications, this is just dumb and counter-intuitive. Instead of fishing where they could recoup millions (probably cumulative billions), they chase after the poor?? 🙄🙄🙄 5mo
lele1432 Would be interesting to see where you are least likely to be audited... 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @lele1432 according to the article, middle class white counties ranked lowest. ...because middle class people NEVER fudge on their taxes! 🙄 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @lele1432 and YES, I agree, but apparently some lawmakers are super worried about people lying to get the EIC (you know welfare lazy bums), but not corporate write-off or subsidies, or tax shelters by, what is it again, the “job creators”. Again 🙄🙄 (edited) 5mo
62 likes8 comments
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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And I got to see my fellow Litten tonight too! It was great seeing you again @BarbaraTheBibliophage

And yes, I‘m stealing and copying our selfie here since I didn‘t think to take one of my own, thank you for thinking of it and I hope you don‘t mind that I‘m copying it. 🤪

** Photo credit to @BarbaraTheBibliophage 😊

BarbaraTheBibliophage Copy away! We‘re everywhere ... 😜 5mo
LeahBergen Fun! 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 5mo
TrishB Cool 👍🏻 5mo
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Cathythoughts How lovely 😀💕 5mo
Mimi28 Awesome!! ❤️❤️ 5mo
Freespirit How nice to meet up! 5mo
DivineDiana Fantastic! 👏🏻💗👏🏻 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Here‘s the one from last night @Gezemice 5mo
readordierachel How cool! 5mo
Gezemice Oh so cool! I love it! So fun! ❤️ 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage Elizabeth Warren has a new video out about this exact subject! All the redlining! 2mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Ooh. I‘ll have to hunt for it. We were talking about Rothstein last night with all the news about Booker‘s proposal to study reparations. 2mo
92 likes14 comments
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Great author talk tonight! If you haven‘t read it yet, you definitely should. Just like Michelle Alexander‘s The New Jim Crow or Matthew Desmond‘s Evicted you will find it eye opening, there is so much the Civil Rights Movement accomplished, and so much more yet to do....but the first step is learning the truth about our history, and this one covers a whole period that you never learned about in school.

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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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Loooook! I got to see @Riveted_Reader_Melissa tonight at an author event. We enjoyed the talk and are already thinking about when we can meet up again. So fun!

JennyM 👋 guys. Lovely to see your faces 5mo
jpmcwisemorgan Yay! That‘s awesome that you got to meet up. (edited) 5mo
Soubhiville Fun! 5mo
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merelybookish That's awesome! 5mo
MelissaSue81 Love this!! 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa It was great to see you again! So glad we could both make this one, such a great book. 5mo
ChasingOm I have this book — I need to get to it! 5mo
Leftcoastzen Nice! 5mo
LeahBergen Wonderful! 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 5mo
TrishB Cool ❤️ 5mo
DivineDiana Fabulous! 👏🏻❤️👏🏻 5mo
Gezemice So great 😊🤗 5mo
143 likes14 comments
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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Rothstein was just as fascinating in person as in his book. This is a must read—you will learn about segregated housing policy and practice, especially what came from the government. Not taught in schools, although it should be. Also got to see @Riveted_Reader_Melissa and that was super! (Pic to follow!)

8little_paws Oh awesome!! This book is outstanding 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @8little_paws He was wonderful, very interesting. 5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @8little_paws It absolutely is! 5mo
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BellaBookNook Glad you got to hear him speak. I added it to my TBR. 5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @BellaBookNook I think you‘ll be glad you read it! 5mo
BellaBookNook I know I will. I like books that give me facts to understand the inequities and that allow me to draw on them when in heated debates. So I will add this to my ever-growing social justice TBR. 5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @BellaBookNook That‘s exactly what I liked about this book. Cold, hard facts presented in an organized, understandable way. 5mo
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HotMessJess
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#BookHaul: day out with my Bubs, hubs, brews and books!

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Samreamer
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Pickpick

Such an important read. I have to force myself to read nonfiction, especially if it‘s not narrative based, and this was worth it. If you‘re interested in learning just how deeply rooted this country is in racism, in this instance related to housing, this is the book for you. It‘s not an easy read by any means, but you should read it anyway.

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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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Pickpick

This was my first 5-star book of 2019, and it was amazing. Example after example show that segregation isn‘t simply a choice made by African Americans. Instead, the government enacted countless policies that forced segregation. It will open your eyes and make you angry. But it‘s incredibly well researched and written. Read it, please!

Full review www.TheBibliophage.com
#thebibliophage2019
#nonfiction2019 #nfbuddyread

Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘ll second that! Great review! 5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I finally wrote the review. I read so many books while I had the flu, and it took me forever to get caught up. 😷🤪 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage oh well, sorry about the flu, but glad you got to read a lot....and that you are feeling better. 5mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Thanks. It was a mild case, thankfully. Still, ugh. 5mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage I completely agree, nothing worse than a cold when the weather is finally showing signs of breaking. 5mo
lele1432 I have GOT to finally read this, it's been on my TBR for forever! 5mo
pocketmermaid Wait, what? There are people who believe segregation was a choice by African Americans?? Holy sharks. 5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @pocketmermaid Yes, crazy right? People who are segregationists use that as an excuse for their behavior and beliefs. 5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @lele1432 It‘s just so so good. Get to it! 😎 5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m so ready for spring—and daylight savings time tonight. Yay!! 5mo
pocketmermaid @BarbaraTheBibliophage Bonkers! This is definitely going on my TBR. 5mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @pocketmermaid Totally bonkers. I think you‘ll be glad you‘ve read it, once you‘re done. 5mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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1. This afternoon‘s view from my kitchen door.
2. Love it—our small city is cooler than ever. Plus it‘s a relatively short drive to four big cities, without having to live in the craziness.
3. Working on my full review—my first five-star read in 2019.
4. Depends on the day
5. Chicken breast, rice, gravy, vegetables, all courtesy of Mr. B

#friYAYintro @howjessreads

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Pickpick

This one is a bonafide Must Read! Highly recommend! If you‘ve read The New Jim Crow or Evicted and felt like you‘ve learned a lot, this one will open your eyes even more to the history & complexity of the moment we find ourselves in, how it got this way, and how we might just be able to unravel it if we have the will. This book takes us through how this country was segregated long after it was legal to do so, and how it‘s become self perpetuating.

AnneCecilie After seeing your quotes from this book, I really want to read it. At the same time those quotes made me sad and angry about the realities of the world. The book will probably reinforce that 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @AnneCecilie It is definitely anger inducing, but I‘m at a point where I want to know the truth about how we got to this place, and only looking at the facts of history will help me to understand that, and to understand where some people are coming from...whether it‘s the Black Lives Matter group or those that want to label them a terrorist group. 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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“Had perpetrators been held to account in even a few well-publicized cases, many thousands of others might have been prevented.”

This passage made me think of how any person of color who commits a crime/mass shooting is a thug/terrorist, but any white man with White National motivations is usually just misunderstood, mentally ill, etc. We still treat these crimes very differently! Dylan Roof being a prime example, Charlottesville...

#NFBuddyRead

BarbaraTheBibliophage I actually have been thinking about reading (or skimming) The New Jim Crow again, in light of this book. Or Chris Hayes‘ book, Colony in a Nation. 6mo
Violetsunrise84 The scary thing about this passage is that even after that act was passed there are still people that live in “urban” areas who are afraid to move. Smh 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Violetsunrise84 And I‘m not surprised considering as of 1990 only 75% of the cases were prosecuted successfully (according to this book), often the police that were supposed to protect were complicit, not to mention stories like Trayvon Martin where just walking in the wrong neighborhood can get you shot as a supposed burglar and still no one is successfully prosecuted. 6mo
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Violetsunrise84 @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Exactly. That‘s the truth. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage Both of those were excellent, and definitely deserve rereads. Have you read Evicted yet? 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage I think I need to read the Carol Anderson that you sent me very soon, and then her newest book. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I haven‘t read Evicted yet. So, I‘m actually more likely to read that before rereading the others. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I have both of her books. Maybe we should read them (or one of them) after Unmentionable. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage I thought you had read the first one already, if not then yes, sounds like a great plan. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage 👏🏻👏🏻 It‘s a plan! 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage So White Rage for April? Am I understanding correctly that you didn‘t read that one yet? 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage Yes, that‘s correct. I haven‘t read either, so let‘s start with her earlier one. White Rage. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage Yep, that‘s definitely a plan then! 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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If we can‘t convince you to leave, forcibly take your property before you build, rezone your area after you built to force you out, or remove services from that new area until it‘s unlivable....we‘ll just seize the land, bulldoze it all and pave over it. 🤬

And sadly this isn‘t an isolated incident, but just 1 summary example from the book.

#NFBuddyRead

GingerAntics Sadly, municipalities have no reason to care how their actions hurt anyone when housing is concerned. Add in a little racism, and it just gets worse. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage I kept thinking about some “urban development” that happened in West Palm Beach while I lived in SoFla. They razed blocks and blocks of homes—we were told they were all being lived in by people involved with crack. But it could have been more like what Rothstein describes. I wonder how many families were affected. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage Probably way more than we even want to imagine on our worst days. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I know, right? Maybe I‘ll got hunting for newspaper articles from that time frame. Or not ... too angry-making. 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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“* “Urban renewal” programs, to clear slums not only for highways but for hospitals, universities, middle-class housing, and offices, operated similarly. That “urban renewal means Negro removal” was a frequent twentieth century slogan of civil rights groups protesting such displacement.”

#NFBuddyRead

BarbaraTheBibliophage Oh, I should have put my other comment here! Next time I‘ll read all your quotes first! 🤪 6mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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So once you read the quote above, you also have to hear that white homeowners in those years accumulated equity. That allowed them to leave inheritances to their children, who then bought property and gained more equity. This didn‘t happen for black families and it still isn‘t.

#NFbuddyread

Riveted_Reader_Melissa And still aren‘t today!!! In the chapter I‘m in, after the housing bubble burst and subsequent meltdown most lost in the subprime scam, and no longer have mortgages that provide any equity. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Oh I know!! And those who sold those mortgages were making bonuses on the backs of people who would lose their homes. 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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...”to maintain the status of African Americans as a lower caste, with housing segregation preserving the badges and incidents of slavery.”

#NFBuddyRead

BarbaraTheBibliophage Systemic assholery is more like it. I can‘t wait to go hear this guy speak! 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘m definitely feeling the those-who-don‘t-know-their-History-are-doomed... because then they can do it to you again, and again, and again. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage I agree, I‘m really looking forward to it! 6mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yes, for sure. I finished listening this afternoon. Now I need to go back to print for the last chapter. More quotes to come. (And my 1st five-star book this year!) 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage Great timing, I should finish tonight or tomorrow too! 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage Hey, @Riveted_Reader_Melissa, this is the Obama speech I read this morning. Perfect capsule of this book, with some other stuff thrown in. https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/A_More_Perfect_Union 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘ll definitely have to check it out! 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘ve been appreciative of his speeches all over again. I loved them when he was in office, and now they give me goosebumps. 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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“In its legal action against Countrywide, the government alleged that the statistical relationship between race and mortgage terms was so extreme that top bank officials must have been aware of the racial motivation. And if top bank officials were aware, so too must have been the government regulators.(...) The discriminatory practices had continued for years under the Federal Reserve‘s supervision.” 🤯🤬

#NFBuddyRead

Samplergal 😡🤬😡🤬😡🤬 6mo
TrishB 😔😔 6mo
45 likes2 comments
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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Way to reject Biblical counsel, churches. This kind of behavior seems antithetical to what we used to call Christian attitudes. So, no more reading this book for at least a day while my BP returns to normal.

#NFbuddyread

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yep! Totally understandable! 6mo
wordzie Un 😎 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @eraderneely I can imagine. That book‘s still on my TBR, along with Dr. Anderson‘s newer one. I saw her speak last fall, and she‘s so great. But these are hard truths. 6mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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My neighborhood is pretty integrated. I can‘t imagine someone coming to me and saying, “don‘t sell your house to *that* family because of their ethnicity or color.” But this book has taught me that my parents might have had those conversations in the 1960s or 1970s. I don‘t think my dad ever lived in an integrated neighborhood. 😳

#nfbuddyread

megnews I recall around age 11 visiting a great uncle in South Carolina and whispered conversations about a family moving in and him going to a meeting with a neighborhood group to stop it. “They can‘t possibly want to live here. They‘ll be more comfortable somewhere else.” Blah blah blah. This though is talking about how the federal government actually designated “black housing projects” and “white housing projects” Not so long ago... 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @megnews Definitely not long ago. House and neighborhoods had covenants that people had to sign, promising not to sell to a “negative element.” Completely unconstitutional, but also difficult to enforce. Now I‘m reading about predatory sub-prime lending to African Americans before the housing bubble burst in 2008. Another horrible, angry-making chapter! 6mo
eraderneely A really interesting book on the history of a specific housing project 6mo
92 likes3 comments
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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Back when I was first diagnosed with RA in 2009, I read a great book (tagged below) about autoimmune disease. I remember the author talking about how these diseases affect black people more than white, and how they often lived in more chemically hazardous places. Now I know why—the government literally gave them no option. 🤬🤯

#NFbuddyread @Riveted_Reader_Melissa

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Isn‘t it insane!!! 😱🤯🤬 6mo
Leftcoastzen Yep!Awful. 6mo
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jenniferw88 Just added both books to my stack as although I don't have an auto-immune disease, I am immunosuppressed due to my transplant, so should be interesting reading for me! Thanks! 6mo
LoverofLit This is heartbreaking! 6mo
wordzie Not 😎 6mo
eri.reads I also have been diagnosed with RA and Fibromyalgia. It's tough, physically and emotionally. I take it one day at a time now. Great recommendations Barbara. 🤗 6mo
78 likes1 stack add7 comments
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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The author of this book is making a strong case for his thesis. ⬆️ It‘s 🤬🤯😳 inducing, though.

p.s. “de jure” means by public policy and law, “de facto” means by private practice

#NFbuddyread

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yes! I think I‘m at the end of chapter 4 and if I ever had any doubts about the case for reparations, I don‘t now. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa That‘s exactly where I am, and I feel the same way. Kamala Harris is talking about it in her Presidential bid. And I remember the case Coates made in this book 6mo
PerksOfBeingABookworm A person in my grad program studies racial residential segregation. St Louis, MO has some pretty infuriating policies that, while removed now, have had serious consequences for this city. The disparities are hard to ignore. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @PerksOfBeingABookworm He actually uses St. Louis as an example quite often. It‘s so ingrained now that we‘re going to have to work extra hard to make changes. 6mo
PerksOfBeingABookworm That doesn‘t surprise me. Has he talked about the Delmar Divide yet? 6mo
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BarbaraTheBibliophage
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Okay @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m going in! I need an audio read right now, so I think that‘ll be my primary method. But I have the hardback to share the quotes that shake me. So far, it‘s awesome.

#nfbuddyread #thecoloroflaw #blackhistorymonth

4thhouseontheleft This was a community book read in Charlotte last month! I‘m bummed I didn‘t get around to reading it yet. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @4thhouseontheleft I think you‘ll appreciate it once you can read it. How is school going?? 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @4thhouseontheleft I think you‘ll really appreciate it, once you have time to read it. How‘s school going?? 6mo
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4thhouseontheleft @BarbaraTheBibliophage I had a bit of a breather this week, but the instructor for my health and wellness class just posted a gazillion new assignments. The frustrating part is she does not do it in a timely way. I have class Tuesday night, and she only posted the new readings this morning, to be completed by Tuesday. This happens every week, which makes my weekends difficult. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘ve been listening to a chapter or 2 and then going back and re-reading or skimming the same chapters for quotes. It‘s all good, but some parts are denser than others. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I think I‘ll use that strategy too! 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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“The HOLC created color-coded maps of every metropolitan area in the nation, with the safest neighborhoods colored green and the riskiest colored red. A neighborhood earned a red color if African Americans lived in it, even if it was a solid middle-class neighborhood of single-family homes.”

So guess who got loans and loan help during the depression. 🙄

#NFBuddyRead

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Just in case you were reading these quotes and thinking, ancient history, that would never happen now.... 🙄

#NFBuddyRead

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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(...) ”The racial aspect of these choices was a desire to avoid the deterioration of white neighborhoods when African American sites were available as alternatives. The welfare of African Americans did not count for much in this policy making. Oftentimes, as in St. Louis, zoning boards made explicit exceptions to their residential neighborhood rules to permit dangerous or polluting industry to locate in African American areas.”

#NFBuddyRead

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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🤬🤯🙄 oh my F-ing god...seriously.

Seriously if you‘ve never understood the argument for reparations, this book will change your mind.

#NFBuddyRead

49 likes1 stack add
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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... wrong-race residents. Judges had to grapple with such questions as whether an African American should be allowed to buy a home on a block that was evenly divided between white and black. A white homeowner moved out while his house was being repaired but then couldn‘t move back because the block was 51 percent black.”

^Truth is literally crazier than fiction.
#NFBuddyRead

Samreamer Just started reading this, and I can‘t stop! If you‘re interested in this topic, check our Evicted next if you haven‘t already! 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Samreamer Yes! I just said to someone, that if you‘ve read The New Jim Crow and/or Evicted and felt like you learned anything you have to read this one next! 6mo
Samreamer @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Yes! Both of those lead me here!! 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Samreamer Isn‘t that funny that we read both of those already!! Such good and important books! 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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These stories always infuriate me...the knowing we were actually making strides that then were reversed and stifled and undone.

Where would we be now without those proverbial 3 steps backwards!

#NFBuddyRead

Suet624 I had no idea. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Suet624 That‘s what I thought, we always learn about The New Deal and great and wonderful things... but here we find out it was one New Deal if you were white, and a totally different and horrible New Deal if you weren‘t....and it was all baked into the government and it‘s programs. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Suet624 Another fun fact I learned this weekend about Wilson that I never knew before....He screened Birth of a Nation at the White House....that‘s the film that reinvigorated the KKK. It was a comment in BlacKkKlansman which I just saw this weekend. 6mo
Suet624 It‘s just so hard to understand. 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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I had never heard this term used this way before, my only association was the movie rental chain Blockbuster, makes me wonder if the term for movies is somehow tied to this use somehow🤔

By the way, at this time the FHA & Veterans Admin. “not only refused to insure mortgages for African Americans in designated white neighborhoods like Ladera; they also would not insure mortgages for whites in a neighborhood where African Americans were present.🙄

Suzze This was a big deal in Detroit in the late 60‘s. All the real estate agents were making it seem like “the sky was falling”. Our house was paid off, and my dad didn‘t want to sell, but the agents convinced him that if he didn‘t sell, he‘d lose everything. It was awful. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Suzze He talks about it going on in many city areas, I think he starts with the San Francisco area specifically because before the war workers come in, there was no pre-existing racial separation going on...and if it happened there in a vacuum, of course it happened worse in places like the south or inner city that already had some segregation going on. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Suzze Interestingly enough he goes on to talk about how those that the homes were sold to were equally “taken” by the real estate agents, once they bought cheap, they immediately jacked up the prices, and since African Americans had been prohibited from buying homes before, they bought anyway even at the outrageous prices, which of course means they had to have multiple families live in a home (double and triple up) to make the payments.... 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ...basically ensuring overcrowding and lack of resources in the area for the population then. 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Again, right after the war, and again in California...a group of families joined together to buy land to make a housing cooperative near Standford for teachers and other middle and working class families because of the severe housing shortage after the war. Again, it came under strict government segregation rules.

By the way, the Stegner mentioned here, is the, later in his life, Pulitzer Prize Winner, Wallace Stegner.”
#NFBuddyRead

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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... Americans at Ford had to choose between giving up their good industrial jobs, moving to apartments in a segregated neighborhood of San Jose, or enduring lengthy commutes between North Richmond and Milpitas. Frank Stevenson bought a van, recruited eight others to share the costs, and made the drive daily for the next twenty years until he retired.”

^this is after the war when Ford moved his plant.... continued below.

Riveted_Reader_Melissa “The trip took more than an hour each way. Of Frank Stevenson and his eight carpoolers, only one was ever able to move farther south, closer to the plant, and he was not able to do so until the late 1960s. He found a home in Hayward, a town about halfway between Richmond and Milpitas that had also previously been closed to African Americans.” 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage This shit just makes me so angry. This book is raising my blood pressure! 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage Yep! That‘s why my limit has been about a chapter a day. It‘s very anger inducing!! 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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This is California where tons of workers flooded during the war to build ships and munitions for ships...but while the government actively built housing for white workers, that mandated an extra room for a guest worker with a separate entrance (think like an in-law addition now) for unmarried white workers, black were prohibited from buying or from living in the spare rooms.

#NFBuddyRead

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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BarbaraTheBibliophage So you got the ebook, huh? I‘ve been gearing up to pull my hardcover off the shelf! 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage Yes, right now I have the audio from Scribd and the ebook from the library... I felt this one needed quotes posted. 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage Then I‘m obviously going to be marking up my book! 🤓 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Seriously if you‘ve read The New Jim Crow or Evicted and felt like it was eye opening, you have to check this one out!

#NFBuddyRead
#Nonfiction2019

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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So good, and I‘m only at the beginning!! If you felt like you learned a lot from The New Jim Crow or Evicted pick this one up!!!

daniwithtea I loved that book! I wish everyone would read it. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @daniwithtea I was just thinking we needed to sign up for another round of nonfiction Litsy postal together again. 6mo
daniwithtea @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I would love that! I‘ve been hoping that one will fall in between my fall and spring semesters so that I can enjoy it without feeling rushed :) 6mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa @daniwithtea When about is that for you? 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Any interest in getting the same group back together @BarbaraTheBibliophage and @tjwill ? 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘d be up for another round! 6mo
daniwithtea @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m done April 25, and I‘ll go back the day after Labor Day. 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Sounds like something we should plan for then! @daniwithtea 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @daniwithtea @tjwill @Riveted_Reader_Melissa If all four of us are in, we could do May, June, July, August. That should suit me too! 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage That would work for me too! Now we‘ll just have to see if Tara is interested too @tjwill 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage Hopefully summer will work better for her too! Now I need to comb through my shelves for suggestions. @tjwill @daniwithtea @riveted_reader_melissa 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @BarbaraTheBibliophage Well we can do that, or even buy a great one between now and then too. 6mo
tjwill @Riveted_Reader_Melissa @daniwithtea @BarbaraTheBibliophage I‘m in! Starting in May works well for me! I‘ll be thinking of some options for my book! 6mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage @tjwill YAYAYYYYYY!!! 6mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @tjwill Wonderful! I‘m so glad you are all interested! May it is! @tjwill @daniwithtea @BarbaraTheBibliophage 6mo
daniwithtea @tjwill wooo!! So excited! 6mo
daniwithtea @Riveted_Reader_Melissa @tjwill @BarbaraTheBibliophage hello all! Are we still good for May, June, July, August? Do we want to go in the same order as last time? I‘m excited to jump into some juicy reading now that the semester‘s done! 4mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @daniwithtea YES! I‘d say May to read your own book, mail by the end of May, June July and August will be the other selections books floating through, with your own returning late August/early Sept. so you can be back on track before the Semester really gets going again. And I‘m fine with the same order as last time, but if anyone wants to switch it up that‘s fine by me too. Just let me know. 4mo
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8little_paws
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Pickpick

I can't recommend this book more. It's premise is that housing segregation has its roots in de jure segregation, from there he outlines many different examples that support that premise. He discusses ways to remedy this situation. I can't collect quotes from this book without highlighting something on every page. Indeed, this was a forgotten history, and this book needs to be made a new classic to keep this history remembered and rectified.

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gby0822
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Pickpick

A must read for those interested in how the government actively played a role in segregation through law and policies. #socialjustice #racism #race #equity

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josie281
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Finishing up this after a beautiful (and chilly) walk downtown tonight.

ChasingOm I‘ve got this on my shelf, waiting for me to be back in work mode... 8mo
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ontheBL
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Pickpick

Today are midterm elections. Our votes matter. Our votes matter to the country. Our votes matter to our friends and family. Our votes matter to people of color. When we vote, those votes allow people to make policies that will affect our lives and the country. When we vote, we vote for people who will make this world a better or worse place. Books like this one help inform and influence the way we vote.
onthebl.org/2018/11/06/the-color-of-law/

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ontheBL
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Today is the day!!!! GO VOTE!!!!

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josie281
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#lunchandbook school edition. High hopes for this one because @kdwinchester recommended it to me not knowing I had to read it for sociology!

mdhughes72 I heard that it was awesome!! 11mo
josie281 ^^^ biased view @mdhughes72 11mo
mdhughes72 Just because I‘m biased doesn‘t mean I‘m not right!! 11mo
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billiebilly
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Pickpick

Informative, detailed, chapters had explanation and anecdotes

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BookishFeminist
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Richard Rothstein is at my library tonight! He wrote my favorite books last year. He chronicles the government‘s direct creation of housing segregation, tearing down integrated neighborhoods to build segregated public housing. It‘s more segregated now than in45 years. I focused on housing law in at law school & have witnessed much of this first hand—it‘s devastating. I wish everyone would read his book bc it affects all of our social issues...

BookishFeminist ...like wealth inequality, income inequality, school segregation, school achievement gaps, health and life expectancy, class mobility, discriminatory acts, etc. It‘s a problem that has only gotten worse over the years and reinforces racial stereotypes that were created and reinforced by unconstitutional discriminatory government policy that many have largely overlooked for the underlying symptoms rather than the root cause of housing segregation. 1y
JamieArc This sounds like such a better choice than Evicted. It‘s an unpopular opinion, but Evicted read like poverty porn to me, and I was hungry for more information. Thanks for this post! 1y
BookishFeminist @JamieArc I disagree that it‘s poverty porn because it‘s very important people understand the gravity of what housing inequality does to families without completely bogging it down with policy, which many people glaze over at. But Desmond‘s book is investigative reporting rather than a more academic book like Rothstein‘s. They have similar messages but very different approaches and I love both. Matthew Desmond will be here in a couple weeks! 1y
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SuperPunkNinja
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Pickpick

I can't say enough about the importance of this book. The federal, state and local governments collaborated with housing associations, banks and even the military and police to segregate African Americans across the U.S. And then they "forgot" to tell us about this history, which still affects millions of people, in our school. Excellent case for reparations.

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mdhughes72
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Pickpick

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ A tour de force. I️ cannot overstate the importance of this book. It is so important and so meticulously researched, and yet so succinct and accessible. I️t is hands down my pick for top nonfiction read of the year. Evidence of intentional state-sanctioned discrimination abounds, but we too easily ignore or overlook it. Much easier to say that segregation is the result of individual private decisions, because it lets us off the hook.

mdhughes72 @Notafraidofwords I️ assign that book to my students! I️ think this one would make a perfect companion. 2y
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mdhughes72
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‘Cities and their suburbs in the West were also blanketed by racial covenants. Between 1935 and 1944 W.E. Boeing, the founder of Boeing Aircraft, developed suburbs north of Seattle. . . . These builders all wrote racially restrictive language into their deeds.‘ @Spiderfelt #seattlesowhite

EchoLogical 👀 2y
Spiderfelt It is sadly apparent. The city is still racially segregated. You see it in the schools, most obviously when our kids play sports. 2y
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mdhughes72
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This is a great read and easy introduction to a hard — morally, not cognitively — subject. Already 1/3 of the way through. I‘d read more if it weren‘t so depressing! I‘m using different color highlighters to mark up the takeaways.

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Dietz123
Pickpick

This is an interesting and well written history. I was aware of unfair housing and lending practices before. I was not aware that before WW1, our nation was actually less segregated. I think that‘s an important point considering today‘s political climate.

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MrBook
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#TBRtemptation post 8! Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, provides a history of the modern American metropolis and argues that local, state, and federal governments have significantly contributed to segregation. Hailed by Ta-Nehisi Coates and NAACP leadership, this history of the 1920s through today is compared to "The Death and Life of Great American Cities". #blameLitsy #blameMrBook ?

RealBooks4ever I remember they talked about this subject in the classic 2y
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BookishFeminist
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#CurrentlyReading | I used to be a real estate & housing lawyer. The segregation & injustice we have in our housing policies cannot be overstated. Most people reference white flight & de facto segregation, but decades of housing policy have contributed to horrible housing conditions for the marginalized with little way to address their grievances. Looking forward to digging into this book to see how it squares with & builds on my knowledge.

mdhughes72 On my TBR! Best cover of 2017. 2y
KVanRead Also discussed in heartbreaking detail in 2y
BookishFeminist @KVanRead Evicted is amazing. This looks like it will focus more on law. 2y
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BookishFeminist @mdhughes72 I agree, I absolutely love this cover. 2y
tapgurl Yet talk to people who lived the white flight. My husband's family had to leave their neighborhood in the 70s when it became unsafe. They were threatened daily and were scared. They lived in Inglewood California. My husband remembers his mom being surrounded by a group of black girls and being punched and kicked and he was too little to help her. Just another perspective... 2y
BookishFeminist @tapgurl however white flight and the degradation of neighborhoods was propagated by government policy that enforced segregation, impoverishing neighborhoods that had minorities. white flight is not disputed in this book (nor do I dispute it), but to pin it on race and say it was "white" flight implies that it's because it's predominantly nonwhite, not due to safety. economically degraded areas often become unsafe no matter the racial makeup. 2y
BookishFeminist @tapgurl eg predominantly white areas of the south and Midwest also have violence issues. to pin an incident of violence on race ("black girls") rather than just "bullies" regardless of race propagates the problem of racial segregation when it's complex- black kids and families have lived in fear of lynching and violent brutality at the hands of neighbors and police, and yet the focus remains on black on white crime. Pls read THIS perspective too. 2y
tapgurl Believe me I'm open to all perspectives. 2y
BookishFeminist @tapgurl I just think it's important that things don't get pinned on race when it props up white supremacy. One instance of black violence ≠ black people are violent. But also important to recognize the systemic racism inherent in govt policy since the creation of this country so we can find ways to change it and do better by everyone. 2y
Notafraidofwords You go ahead girl with your bad self. This perspective matters, eviction or bad housing can keep people in cycles or poverty forever. 2y
tapgurl I'm just telling you what happened to my husband I find it interesting because I grew up in oblivion and except for my extensive reading as a kid would not know how others had lived and suffered. Reading opened my eyes for sure. I actually wonder what happened to those girls in their past to make them so hateful. I'm sure it was not pretty. 2y
moranadatter The author did an interview on NPR a few months ago. I added the book to my TBR because he had an interesting takeaway that I hadn‘t heard before: Problems created by policy can be solved by policy. I‘ll be interested to hear what you think of this. 2y
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