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Hillbilly Elegy
Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis | J. D. Vance
From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of Americas white working class Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisisthat of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.s grandparents were dirt poor and in love, and moved north from Kentuckys Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vances grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history. A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.
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Vivlio_Gnosi
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Adding this #Nonfiction book to my #TBR stack for #NFNov
@rsteve388 @Clwojick

rsteve388 1 pt 1w
11 likes1 comment
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EmilyM
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Pickpick

A re read for me. Still such a good book. ⭐⭐⭐⭐/5

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Tiltedwhirled
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Pickpick

Much if this book was thoughtful. However, I wish the author had been more reflective of the ways that his own privilege effected his experience.

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TamTracy
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Pickpick

I‘m a social worker who absolutely loves everything sociological. I loved reading this personal account of a group of people I know very little about. His story is amazing and so well written. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

BeaG @TamTracy I grew up in the town where this story takes place. I haven't read it. 1mo
TamTracy @BeaG Any reason you haven‘t read it? I‘m curious. 1mo
BeaG @TamTracy I heard mixed reviews about it and it didn't peek my interest. 1mo
62 likes2 stack adds3 comments
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danibel
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Currently reading

10 likes1 stack add
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jckphnx
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Pickpick

It‘s an intimate approach to the problems that plague the so-called hillbilly population, presenting dysfunction as mere difference, but the author attempts to not make excuses; it is also impossible for this reviewer to judge the book fairly considering the similarities in lived experiences.

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Zoes_Human
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@howjessreads #friyayintro

1) It's a book of lies. He's not even from the Appalachia.

2) The Big Fat Quiz shows from the UK

3) Roasted corn and bacon chowder

4) Eastern (US)

4)Blue Dream (sounds chill)

4thhouseontheleft I didn‘t like Hillbilly Elegy either. 2mo
britt_brooke I bailed on this book - and I very rarely bail. I‘m not from Appalachia, but I‘m from Kentucky and the generalizations killed me. 2mo
14 likes2 comments
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AnnCollins
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This weeks secondhand book haul #secondhand #thriftedliterature Excited to read these but especially excited for Hillbilly Elegy. I‘m a sucker for Appalachian lit!

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candority
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Mehso-so

Equal parts social commentary and memoir, Hillbilly Elegy is an interesting and well-written account of growing up in a white, working-class family in America and the impacts of the ‘hillbilly‘ culture on individuals/families. I saw many similarities between Vance‘s experiences and the “redneck” culture in rural Ontario, and often found myself agreeing with Vance‘s analyses. Unfortunately, the book wasn‘t quite as engrossing as I expected it to be

SamAnne This was once on my TBR list but the mixed reviews have it in my third pile. It intrigued me because I grew up in a redneck logging community watching the devastation and social ills that come with extractive corporations. 3mo
candority @SamAnne I thought it was a quick read. So depending on how fast you read, it would probably still be worth your time! 3mo
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ChristinasBookChronicles
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Pickpick

One of the best ways to understand someone unlike you is to listen to their story with an open mind. If you were born and raised in a big city, this book might be a bit of a culture shock. As a sociologist, these topics were already familiar to me, but I appreciate that this book gives you a more intimate and personal perspective of what living poor in the Rust Belt is like with the ability to reach a much wider audience, as is needed. Great read!

12 likes4 comments
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TuesdayReviews
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Pickpick

I have a lot in common with Vance. We‘re about the same age, we both grew up poor hillbillies, we both wound up going to elite law schools. I‘ve read Hillbilly Elegy twice now. It is so poignant and familiar. Full review at Hillbilly Highways (with pictures from my trip to Jackson and Middletown) - https://hillbillyhighways.wordpress.com/2019/07/31/nonfiction-hillbilly-elegy-jd...

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LogiKitty
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Pickpick

This is one of the best books I have ever listened to and I'm really awed by the similarities these folks experienced despite me living in a “liberal/better off“ area (where we pretend this doesn't happen) and where Vance spent his childhood. He challenges us to be compassionate for “his people“ because of the cycles of abuse and suffering generation after generation. He challenges us to see them for their values - family & tradition. THIS. 😍 😭

LogiKitty To be clear: I do not believe that where I live is some “better-off“ area. People just believe CA is this safehaven from terrible things because we're more liberal, but a lot of the same things happen here (poverty, abuse, alcohol and drug abuse, etc). 4mo
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LogiKitty
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I can only seem to read a bit at a time cause nearly ever chapter has got me sniffly. This last chapter...JD humanizing the statistic and theory that having 1 loving adult in your life can change everything and create a gritty, resilient child by saying it's more than just words - it's a feeling he doesn't need theory to feel. Thanks Mamaw Vance 🥺 #24B4Monday

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LogiKitty
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Honestly, I'm so taken aback by this book. It's somewhat what I expected to learn, but there's so much more that's really heartbreaking and humanizing about "poor white trash" (basically the author's words, not mine). I can't wait to continue! About 1/3 the way through!

The_Real_Nani Very illuminating! 4mo
LogiKitty @The_Real_Nani have you read this one? 🙂 4mo
The_Real_Nani @LogiKitty Yes! A couple of years ago. At the time, I was like, wow this makes a lot of sense. But now, looking back, so much has happened that I wonder how I would feel about the book if I re-read it. 3mo
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Texreader
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Today‘s ebook special. I found this nonfiction book really interesting and I recommend it.

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MelKelsey
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Mehso-so

Marketed as a memoir, Hillbilly Elegy reads more like interesting political and sociological nonfiction. With my education in education, the conclusions Vance draws are familiar to me. Children that have multiple traumas can succeed if they have a positive relationship with an adult that believes in them and if they are taught how to maneuver the system. A good and important read, but not my cup of tea.

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marleed
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Okay,I‘ve finally jumped in to read this. There‘s a million little pieces why I‘d yet to read this book beginning with memoir vs auto-fiction. I‘m committed to working down my physical TBR and this is an IRL bookclub pick. However, I‘m protecting my perspective on Appalachia by wearing my James Frey memoir-tainted glasses while reading.

marleed I anticipated a complete disdain this book, but found it interesting and thought-provoking - my memoir-tainted shades may have helped. I felt the author‘s life experiences and education gave him a perspective well-worth capturing in print. I felt he treated Appalachia like other characters in his harsh upbringing - flawed but loved. 4mo
ValerieAndBooks I read this last summer (son was reading it for school) and, like you, thought it was thought-provoking even if I didn‘t agree with some of his opinions. 4mo
marleed @ValerieAndBooks I thought I be angered or frustrated by this, but I really wasn‘t. I felt he offered up his voice and perspective without assuming he was speaking for everyone. I cringed at his hillbilly reference because it‘s a word I couldn‘t imagine using to describe someone. But I understand it is right for him to use it. 4mo
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candority
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Some recent purchases. All from a local used “book shack” where all proceeds go towards building a new library!

candority @LeahBergen A friend recommended it to me a couple weeks ago! 4mo
103 likes2 comments
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heyitsMacall
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Pickpick

I liked this! It shows what a difference education and a stable home life can make in a person‘s life. I understand how people were so interested in this book a few years ago. I definitely learned something from this story.

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TuesdayReviews
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Post-yard work book and beer.

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Lmacharg
Pickpick

I enjoyed it a lot. I was able to get through it quickly. Presented an interesting viewpoint of growing up in a community with various struggles and the difficulty of getting out of it without various hurdles.

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TuesdayReviews
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Did a little exploring in J.D. Vance‘s hometown.

MelKelsey Super cool! 4mo
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OrangeMooseReads
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Did my short walk this morning since I have a bunch of stuff to do today and it‘s misty raining.
I figured I would give this book one more shot. Ok I get it you grew up in a shitty environment and but you had a sister you loved and grandparents that would do anything for you. What makes you special? The region? Ok, but you didn‘t grow up in a special region. Vance your book sucks.
#bookfitnesschallenge

Riveted_Reader_Melissa 😂Great review! I love a good honest unpopular opinion review! And I‘ve seen a few for this book! 6mo
Blaire I live in WV and this book made me and most of my book club so mad. 😑 disappointed that it got so much hype. 6mo
BookwormAHN Nice review 👏🏻 6mo
readordierachel Yeah, this one didn't work for me either. 6mo
wanderinglynn I agree with your review. But great job on walking despite the weather! 🙌🏻 6mo
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Texreader
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I‘ve finished 16 of 26 letters for #LitsyAtoZ not counting the letters for which I‘ve read multiple books. I‘ve completed all the letters on the first page of my index! Ten books to go! I‘ve never been this far ahead. So glad I‘m doing the #nonfiction2019 challenge too. I‘ve a long way to go on that one.

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Texreader
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About clerking after law school: “Sprinkled on top of these factors is the reality that you work closely with these judges. And no one wants to waste a year getting berated by an asshole in black robes.” I relate in so many ways to the author of this book having been the poor kid in a large public university, then a pretty decent law school, and a clerkship. I just managed my way through never really knowing the secrets to success.

GingerAntics Wow. I‘m so glad I didn‘t take the law route. I seriously considered it but in the end decided I wasn‘t competitive enough, in the right ways, to hack it. 6mo
Texreader @GingerAntics In my law school class, folks were hugely competitive. I was so fortunate to have gone to work 7 years before going back to law school, so I had a lot of grounding and maturity that made that part of going to law school much less stressful for me. Not to say it wasn‘t very very hard! 6mo
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OrangeMooseReads
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Inside steps it is today. Maybe later I‘ll get a real walk in.
#bookfitnesschallenge

nu-bibliophile It's raining in my side too 6mo
OrangeMooseReads @nu-bibliophile this rain is really getting annoying lol 😆 6mo
Read4life We‘re going to get into the mid 90s the next 6 days. I‘ll be walking inside too. (And dreaming of snow ❄️ 🤓) 6mo
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OrangeMooseReads @Read4life that is way too hot 🥵 6mo
Emilymdxn 😞😞😞 inside steps still count tho! Well done for even considering exercise on a day like that 6mo
4thhouseontheleft I'm appreciating the overcast day, it's forecasted for 96F on the weekend. 😳 6mo
OrangeMooseReads @Emilymdxn I‘m really trying hard to break my laziness habits. 6mo
OrangeMooseReads @4thhouseontheleft it is way too early in the early for that kind of weather. 6mo
Clwojick This is me too today 💙 6mo
BookwormAHN The heat is killing me down here 🌺 6mo
OrangeMooseReads @Clwojick as long as we are moving right 👍🏼 6mo
OrangeMooseReads @BookwormAHN I am not looking forward to the heat coming all too soon up here 6mo
CoverToCoverGirl I think it‘s raining everywhere! 6mo
44 likes13 comments
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OrangeMooseReads
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Vance uses the phrase “welfare queen” in his prologue/opening chapter. He may have graduated from Yale Law but he does not know what “welfare queen” meant/means. I‘m going to bet he doesn‘t even know where it originated.

tournevis Let me guess, all tue characters in the book are white... 6mo
OrangeMooseReads @tournevis all the characters are white lol 6mo
tournevis @OrangeMooseReads *shakes head* 6mo
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wanderinglynn @tournevis In fairness to Vance, where he grew up was probably predominately Caucasian. I too grew up in Appalachia (although in Tennessee not Kentucky) and when I was growing up, there was almost no diversity—less than 10% of the population were African American. And that was the extent of the diversity. But I will also say that I had issues with his book for other reasons. 6mo
OrangeMooseReads @wanderinglynn I did fail to mention that in my statement. That also furthers his miss use of “welfare queen” 6mo
wanderinglynn @OrangeMooseReads Agree. I had a lot of issues with his book too. Starting with that his story is highly unusual. And I took issue that it seemed he was trying to comment on all of Appalachia and his experience was not like mine. 6mo
tournevis @wanderinglynn Yeah but come on! It's such a racially loaded term! When Bush père said it, he wasn't talking about Appalachia, at all. I'm not American and even I know that! 6mo
wanderinglynn @tournevis Not disputing that a Yale law grad should know better. He should have not the term. But that doesn‘t mean that people in his area didn‘t use the term that (wrong) way. Appalachia has high levels of illiteracy and a tendency to misuse words/terms. 6mo
LaurensLibrary I didn't really like this book in general 6mo
rretzler Vance grew up in Middletown Ohio which is not part of Appalachian Ohio. I believe some of his family members may have been from Appalachia. He may have had some experiences similar to those living in some Appalachian communities but probably more similar to those from low-income families. (I hate over-generalizations). I grew up in “Appalachian Ohio” as did my parents (all in different communities) and my upbringing was totally different from his. 6mo
51 likes10 comments
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OrangeMooseReads
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My next #Bookfitnesschallenge book. Hoping I get my full walk in before it rains again.

Caterina Hope it doesn't rain on you! 🤞Enjoy! 6mo
nu-bibliophile It's been raining on/off where I live too 6mo
BookwormAHN Good luck, we've had a lot of rain here too 🍀 6mo
59 likes3 comments
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Texreader
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And up next: I may be from Texas but I‘m from Scots-Irish stock on my dad‘s side and having read the intro, I fear the similarities. But having parents with an entrepreneurial streak who gave me a brutal work ethic I hope my story (I‘m, too, the first to college, then law school) diverges significantly from the author‘s. We‘ll see...

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wen4blu
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Up next for the "didn't I run these same errands last week" car trip around town.

43 likes2 stack adds
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ke1lbe1l

Pew Economic Mobility Study found there‘s no group more pessimistic than working class whites, based on a comparison of this group to other races in the same class or to college-educated individuals of the same race. The questions centered on whether their children would likely be better off, or whether they themselves were better off than their parents. Less of this group agreed those statements are/would be true.

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ke1lbe1l

In speaking of someone he met in his hometown, who quit his job and then lamented on social media about the Obama economy, the author reflects “I don‘t doubt that the Obama economy has affected many, but this man is assuredly not among them. His status in life is directly attributable to the choices he‘s made. And his life will improve only through better decisions.” He notes a trend in white culture to blame society/gov‘t for “being a loser.”

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ke1lbe1l
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Lessons from the author‘s grandpa:
“He taught me that lack of knowledge and lack of intelligence were not the same. The former could be remedied with a little patience and a lot of hard work. And the latter - well - I guess you‘re up shit creek without a paddle.”
“The measure of a man is how he treats the women in his family.”

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ke1lbe1l
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Some tips from the author‘s grandma on how to fight include standing sideways to be a smaller target and to punch with your whole body (“very few people appreciate how unimportant your fist is when it comes to hitting someone”) ... 💪 I‘m a fan of this woman

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ke1lbe1l
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“So to Papaw and Mamaw, not all rich people were bad. But all bad people were rich.”

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Texreader
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The main character in my new book, Cold Blood by Michael Lister, does what I do: find the bookstores in the towns he visits for work! A few pages later it‘s revealed he goes by the bookstore and buys the tagged book for his wife (I just bought the same book when I spoke at a conference in Houston). Love this coincidence!

GingerAntics That‘s really cool. 7mo
RachelO I‘m working on a nonfiction book for a publisher, and I‘ve just added Seaside, Florida to the index - never heard of it before. Want to visit now 😁 7mo
59 likes1 stack add2 comments
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MrBook
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Stop 5 on today‘s home-library tour!

Very few people know I have and have read these books. I encourage folks to read anything and everything they can and want, but the sentiment is rarely reciprocated. Our #LitsyFamily bucks that trend. 🤗

Do you own or have you read any of these books?!

This is one of my poli sci/philosophy shelves.

#MrBooksBooks

mydearwatson I‘ve always wanted to read _The Wealth of Nations_ after reading a small section of it in school. 7mo
SW-T Read Hillbilly Elegy. 7mo
59 likes2 comments
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MrBook
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Picture 7/~15 shots of inside Amazon‘s #NYC bookstore!

Sorry many of these pics have the books rather small. Not much room to take pictures, as you can gather by some of the angles.

Another great category!

Have you read any of these?!

Lcsmcat Seven of them. 7mo
Kaylamburson Six of them! 7mo
Swe_Eva Excellent, I‘ll be in NYC in a couple of weeks - I‘ll have to check out this store (after The Strand, of course...), 👍🏻 7mo
See All 6 Comments
LiteraryinLititz 5 of them! 7mo
MrBook @Swe_Eva 😁👏🏻🙌🏻 7mo
Clwojick 5 for me too! I love 7mo
79 likes6 comments
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Oblomov26
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Mehso-so

Well this is was a quick read, but I am not sure what I think about it. In some ways having grown up in a working class family in Australia, being the first to go university I recognise some of the circumstances he discusses and going home to my old neighbourhood I also know people like he describes. But I also find myself disagreeing with his politics and the level of his self satisfaction which comes across in his writing. He asks valid and

Oblomov26 Pressing questions facing the working class in the developed world, but I am not sure he offers any answers. How do you provide a supportive family environment for those kids from broken homes given the break down in social capital which such societies have experienced? (edited) 7mo
CocoReads Those were my thoughts as well. I gave it a pick because although I didn‘t agree with his politics and I didn‘t feel he had any answers, I did come to understand my husbands family a bit more. 7mo
Oblomov26 @CocoReads I very nearly gave it a pick ... it is in that difficult to assign middle ground for me 7mo
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CocoReads @oblomov same here-I tend to love a book or hate a book but I‘m trying to be better at middle ground. The other reason I gave a pick was that I‘m not much of a non fiction reader but I did keep turning the pages in this one. 7mo
Chrissyreadit @CocoReads @Oblomov26 this is on my TBR, and I am a transplant to WV. After reading more reviews I‘m struggling- I‘ve never lived in a place where people seem so quick to work against themselves. 7mo
Joanne1 I had similar feelings. I enjoyed the memoir aspects of the book but not so much his political stance or the answers (or lack of) he offered. 7mo
Aimeesue I loathe this book. Vance blames people entirely for the situations they're in without even mentioning the systemic problems (lack of health care, public transportation, employers that pay living wages, etc) that contribute. I get the whole pull-yourself-up-by-the-bootstraps sentiment, but that doesn't work if you have no boots AND you have to worry about lack of day care, medical appointments in the next county, aged parents all at once. Ugh. 7mo
Oblomov26 @Aimeesue and this is the reason I left it at so so and what I meant in regards to the lack of social capital - broken families, no extended support structures, lack of defined community reduced government assistance etc. He acknowledges he only made it because of his grandparents (he had boots). What is the answer? Wished I had one, only thing I know it cannot be the status quo. 7mo
Schnoebs You should try this.... I read this before going to hillbilly and I actually decided not to pick it up after reading this 7mo
Suet624 @Aimeesue I‘m with you. 7mo
64 likes3 stack adds10 comments
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Mrs_Organized_Chaos
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Pickpick

I am really enjoying this book. Being in Ohio I can relate to a lot of what the author is talking about.

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squirrelbrain
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Two books with a lot of sky on the cover.....

#showusyourcover

#sky

@kaye

Kaye Great choices. Both have lots of sky. I‘ve read both these and liked them. 😊 9mo
Cathythoughts I love the one on the left 💙 9mo
tracey38 Great covers! 9mo
80 likes3 comments
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Picaveli
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Panpan

Do yourself a favor... pick up this book by Appalachian historian Elizabeth Catte to recover from the tired tropes of jd vance

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Cinfhen
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Pickpick

Mixed feelings about this one. As a memoir I found this book engrossing although listening to JD Vance was painful. His narration was as entertaining as my sophomore chemistry teacher. Additionally I felt that JD was often preachy & sanctimonious. I‘m not sure if his generalizations were accurate although I do believe he “understands “ certain parts/communities of Appalachia. Still a relevant read. A good starting point.

AlaMich Yeah, I bailed on the audio of this because of his narration 10mo
britt_brooke His generalizations are what killed it for me. I expected a more educated approach from someone who went to Yale Law School. 10mo
Cinfhen I can see how that could raise your blood pressure @britt_brooke I tried to look at this as HIS personal experience but not a look at Appalachia as a whole. 10mo
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Reviewsbylola His outlook really struck a personal note with me. I‘m pretty sure one of the families he talks about are related to the family of my stepdaughter‘s soon to be ex stepfather (geez that sounds confusing). 10mo
BridgetteM I totally agree with your assessment! As a memoir, Hillbilly Elegy is great. However, his generalizations got really judge-y to me. He seemed to think he could diagnose why someone wasn‘t “successful” in life after one short conversation with them. SMH. 10mo
Cinfhen I think he had some interesting ideas @Reviewsbylola @BridgetteM but he came across as too self righteous and not very likeable. 10mo
BridgetteM @Cinfhen Totally agree! 10mo
123 likes7 comments
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Cinfhen
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#LitsyWalkers 👟Short walk ~ my friend suggested I listen to this memoir after we discussed Educated and Glass Castles 🎧 Question...is there a way to bookmark a sentence or paragraph when listening to an #audio???

Kaye Good job @Cinfhen If you‘re using audible, you can click on Clip , then Add note. 10mo
Kaye On libby , click the bookmark, then make a note. (edited) 10mo
Soubhiville @Cinfhen in Hoopla you can bookmark as well. I‘m not sure if Libby/Overdrive has that feature, I haven‘t tried. 10mo
See All 21 Comments
Soubhiville Ah, I see @kaye has! 10mo
Cinfhen Thanks, I was missing the obvious @kaye @Soubhiville 💋 10mo
Tanisha_A Nice walkway!🚶‍♀️ 10mo
julesG Try finding the sentence using Google books. 10mo
Cinfhen Thanks @julesG if only I could remember the sentence😂😂 it is a pretty path @Tanisha_A How was your wedding???? 10mo
Tanisha_A @Cinfhen Hahahaha! It wasn't my wedding! 😂 A friend from college got married. It was great. Met some other college friends after a long while. Good food, lots of talking talking! Fun times! 😀 10mo
Cinfhen I worded that wrong.... you wrote you were going to a friend‘s wedding @Tanisha_A 😂😂glad you had fun 10mo
Tanisha_A @Cinfhen Thank you! 😘 I'll share LitFest pictures with you all, it starts from 24th! 10mo
Reviewsbylola I thought this book was so relevant. 10mo
Oryx I read these three back to back as well. They go well together. 10mo
4thhouseontheleft I hope you like this one more than I did! After really not liking his book, someone suggested this one as a better alternative. 10mo
Tex2Flo Good to see some other reads for that area. I can‘t say that I liked Hillbilly Elegy, but I was glad t9 have some new understanding of the geography. 10mo
DarcysMom That looks like a nice place to walk. Does the path go very far? 10mo
Cinfhen The path is very short @DarcysMom it‘s more like a walkway that connects my apt complex to the main road but it‘s usually lush & green and in certain seasons there are lemon trees and pomegranate trees. 10mo
Cinfhen Thanks for the suggestions @8little_paws @4thhouseontheleft I‘ve added them to my reading list. I‘m not to far into this audio so at the moment I have no opinion other than I was not compelled to listen further when my walk ended. It might take some time to get through this one @Oryx @Reviewsbylola @Tex2Flo 😉 10mo
Bklover Pretty!!😘😘 10mo
britt_brooke Curious to hear what you think about this one. It‘s one of the few books I‘ve actually bailed on. 10mo
148 likes1 stack add21 comments
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CocoReads
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Pickpick

While I didn‘t love this book, I did really like it. It‘s not likely to change my political views, but I didn‘t totally disagree with him either. I admire the way he was able to beat the odds of his background and I could feel the love (and frustration) he has with his family and culture. In a weird way, it helped me understand my husbands family better, and a bit of mine as well. #newyearwhodis @ElenaBaer @monalyisha

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CocoReads
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I just watched this episode! #newyearwhodis @ElenaBaer @monalyisha (my sister and I call watching The West Wing spending time with the good president🤣🤣)

Sallyo5 Love this ‼️ 10mo
monalyisha Ha! 10mo
LeslieO Couldn‘t agree more with you and your sister! 10mo
54 likes3 comments
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Jdroper
Pickpick

Read after reading Educated. Similar, but different.

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CocoReads
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Some hot tea and reading on a cold morning before I leave for work. I love my new mug but I‘m wishing I would have gotten the travel one as well since some days, I say this multiple times at work.

SamanthaMarie I bought a mug similar to that for my husband. He loves foxes and loves that mug. A travel one of it is such a good idea!! 10mo
OriginalCyn620 Love the mug! 👌🏻 10mo
CocoReads I got it on Amazon. Pretty sure I‘ll wind up with the travel mug and possibly the wineglasses at some point. Saw a decent sized pair of foxes a few nights ago as they crossed the road in front of me. It‘s apparently mating season and did you know a female fox in heat sounds like a kid is being murdered. It‘s disturbing, especially when you watch a lot of crime shows 10mo
Bklover Great mug! I think I‘d sleep with earplugs during fox mating season!! 10mo
Wife Cute😍 🦊 10mo
74 likes5 comments
review
Monpetitoiseau
Mehso-so

I got a ‘Glass Castle‘ vibe from it - he and Walls have a more elitist tone to their “I did it, so can you” message, which I think they intended to be inspiring/relatable. Both have crackerjack IQs which they fail to identify as the magic ingredient that helped lift them out of poverty and escape the drama of their class of origin. All in all, I appreciated this book as I never read conservative white male work and now I‘m set for ‘19. 🎉

review
Rj6578
Pickpick

Good read and shows where you came from doesn‘t always predict where you end up, but it sure does influence it.