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TheKidUpstairs

TheKidUpstairs

Joined September 2016

She/Her "When I get a little money, I buy books. If any is left, I buy food and clothes.” Host of #OnThisDay #HistoryGetsLIT
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Ship of Magic by Robin Hobb
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The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story by Nikole Hannah-Jones, The New York Times Company
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TheKidUpstairs
The Phantom of the Opera | Gaston Leroux
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#OnThisDay in 1908 Gaston Leroux' The Phantom of the Opera began serialization in Le Gaulois. Leroux's inspiration for the tale came from a real fire which caused a chandelier to crash, and rumors of ghosts haunting Paris' famed Palais Garnier. The story was not immediately successful, but slowly grew a sort of cult fan base. (Cont'd in comments) #HistoryGetsLIT

TheKidUpstairs To date, it has been adapted into just about every medium available (please do yourself a favor and check out the poster for Robert Englund's Phantom) including the longest running show on Broadway. 3d
rubyslippersreads Soon to close on Broadway … 😢 3d
vivastory @rubyslippersreads I listened to it again last night 3d
50 likes2 stack adds3 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
The Fifth Season | N. K. Jemisin
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#OnThisDay in 1972 Nora Keita Jemisin was born. Raised in Mobile, Alabama Jemisin spent much of her time immersed in fairy tales and fantasy at the local library, and summers in NYC with her father who introduced her to Twilight Zone and Star Trek. In 2015 she became the first Black author to win the Hugo Award for Best Novel for The Fifth Season. 👇 #HistoryGetsLIT

TheKidUpstairs Over the next two years, she was the first ever author to win the award three years in a row and for all three books in a trilogy. 7d
Blerdgal_Fenix I absolutely love her!! 7d
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TheKidUpstairs @5feet.of.fury so so good, right? I loved them too 6d
TheKidUpstairs @Blerdgal_Fenix she's awesome. I'm so looking forward to 6d
55 likes6 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1954 William Golding's Lord of the Flies was published. After being rejected by 21 publishers, the book was released to mediocre critical reviews and low sales. But over the next decade, critical and public acclaim grew and by the mid-60's the book was being taught in schools and had sold enough copies to allow Golding to leave his 20 year teaching career in favour of a full time writing life. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1507 King James IV granted Walter Chepman and Andrew Myllar a patent for the first printing press in Scotland. With this privilege Chepman and Myllar (sometimes written as Chapman and Miller) began printing popular tracts, mainly short romances, ballads, and poems from Scottish writers and liturgical books with a Scottish character. A few items remain in existence, including The Aberdeen Breviary (pictured). #HistoryGetsLIT

Librariana It looks beautiful! 2w
41 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
Star Spangled Banner | Francis Scott Key
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#OnThisDay in 1814 Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the poem "Defense of Fort McHenry" after witnessing the British attack on the titular fort while being held in Baltimore Harbor under guard of the British Navy. Key went on to set his poem to the tune of "Anacreon in Heaven" and the resulting song, The Star Spangled Banner, soon became the de facto national anthem of the new USA. It was made official in 1931 by Congress. #HistoryGetsLIT

Texreader Thanks for posting. I‘m so glad I got to visit Fort McHenry many years ago. 2w
42 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1966 New Beacon Books released its first publication: Foundations by John La Rose. La Rose, a poet, activist, and publisher, was originally from Trinidad and Tobago. He and partner Sarah White founded New Beacon to focus on the work of Caribbean writers (later expanded to include Black authors from around the world). New Beacon is still in operation as the only Black independent publisher and bookseller in the UK. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
Alcools | Guillaume Apollinaire
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#OnThisDay in 1911 French playwright and poet Guillaume Apollinaire was arrested on suspicion of stealing the Mona Lisa. He was released a week later after implicating Picasso in the theft. Apollinaire was a popular member of the Parisian artistic community and became one of the foremost French poets of the early 20th century following the publication of Alcools in 1913. #HistoryGetsLIT

vivastory The Mona Lisa theft was wild! There should be a Netflix documentary on it🤣 The museum guard was literally asleep on the job 3w
TheKidUpstairs @vivastory I'm surprised there's not one! I think there's a never ending audience for heist movies (myself included - Smooth and well crafted, or bumbling amateur thief, I'll watch them all) 3w
51 likes2 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
Would You Rather... | John Burningham
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#HauntedHollowSwap Would You Rather? with @wanderinglynn
👻 ghost
🎃 extra Halloween for sure!
🕸 getting stuck in anything is terrifying, but I get anxious in mazes if I feel too lost!
🧙‍♀️ can I be scary-cute? Growing up I tended to be something cute-but-dead for Halloween!
🎃 pumpkin patch
🥧 pumpkin pie (unless it's grown up cider 🤣)
👩‍🎤 Store bought (I'm lazy)
🍬 treat
🪄 make a potion
🍫🍬🍭 savour it slowly for sure!

wanderinglynn ☠️🖤🙌🏻 3w
29 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
The Haunting of Hill House | Shirley Jackson
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I think this collage sums up my fall/Halloween aesthetic: warm tea, candles and lanterns, Hill House, eerie woods, ghost walks, Casper, and the Sanderson Sisters (who else is eagerly awaiting HP2!?)
#HHS22 #HauntedHollowSwap @wanderinglynn

wanderinglynn Love it! 👻🖤🙌🏻 3w
50 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
The Haunting of Hill House | Shirley Jackson
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1. Ooh, I love them all... Logically a black cat would be possible. But I might have to say a bat. We've got a bat box in our backyard, and this summer we FINALLY had a couple hanging around for a bit! 🦇🦇🦇

2. I read the tagged every October.

3. I yell and cover my eyes. But hubby refuses to watch anything scary, so it's been awhile!

4. I Put a Spell on You (the Sanderson Sisters version!) Or Black Cat by Janet Jackson.

5. Hocus Pocus!

38 likes2 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
On the Road | Jack Kerouac
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#OnThisDay in 1957, Jack Kerouac's On The Road was published. The counterculture tale was written in just three weeks, and still stands as a defining work of the beat generation. Exactly one year later in 1958, Boris Pasternak's Dr Zhivago was first published in the US. That year it was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, but Pasternak refused to leave the USSR to accept the award for fear of government reprisals. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
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#HHS22 This or That with @wanderinglynn 🎃

Many of these were close calls, but don't come at me with a caramel apple. It always gets stuck in my teeth, and the apple loses all texture. No thank you!

wanderinglynn 🎃🙌🏻👻 3w
40 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
The Tale of Peter Rabbit | Beatrix Potter
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#OnThisDay in 1893 Beatrix Potter wrote a letter to 5 year old Noel Moore, the son of her former governess. Included in the letter was a small story about a cheeky rabbit named Peter. A few years (and stories) later, the Moore family realized the commercial potential in Potter's animal tales. Beatrix expanded Peter's story and added some illustrations before introducing Peter Rabbit to the world in 1901. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
The Blind Assassin: A Novel | Margaret Atwood
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#OnThisDay in 2000 Margaret Atwood's The Blind Assassin was published by McClelland and Stewart. Atwood's 13th novel was her first to win the Booker Prize, and also took home the Hammett Prize, among other nominations. Despite mixed reaction from critics, the award buzz spurred it to become second only to Handmaid's Tale for international book sales. #HistoryGetsLIT

BiblioLitten This is my favourite book by Atwood. 3w
Jaimelire Great book 3w
65 likes2 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
Unnatural Magic | C. M. Waggoner
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TheBookWitchON Sent yours last night! 3w
33 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
Frankenstein | Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
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#OnThisDay in 1797 the mother of science fiction, Mary Shelley, was born Mary Godwin in London, England. After running away from home at the age of 16 with the married Percy Shelley, she famously penned Frankenstein at 18 following a challenge from Lord Byron. Published anonymously in 1818, Mary wasn't credited as the author until 1823, and never received royalties for her most famous work. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
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Kids get indoor playgrounds and arcades, Mom gets her book. This is how we rainy day!

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TheKidUpstairs
Dunfermline Carnegie Library | Dunfermline, Fife, United Kingdom (Library)
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#OnThisDay in 1883 the first (of what would be over 2500) Carnegie Library opened in Dunfermline, Scotland. After making his fortunes in the American steel industry, Carnegie devoted the last years of his life to philanthropy, giving away around $350m ($5.5b today). One of his many efforts was the founding of the Carnegie Libraries, starting in his hometown. #HistoryGetsLIT

Megabooks We have a Carnegie library in my town that is now the art museum. (We still have a library too, just in a newer building.) 4w
Gissy 😍 (edited) 4w
CarolynM There‘s a Carnegie Library building next door to the Town Hall in my suburb in Melbourne Australia. The library itself was moved to a bigger, modern building a few years ago. 4w
57 likes3 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
Bars Fight | Lucy Terry Prince
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#OnThisDay* in 1746 a group of Native Americans conducted a raid on two settler families in Deerfield, Mass. Lucy Terry (later Prince), who was enslaved by a nearby family, composed the oral ballad "Bars Fight Aug 28 1746" about the incident. It was later written down and published in 1855. It is the only work of Terry's to survive to this day, and it is the oldest known work of literature by an African American. #HistoryGetsLIT

TheKidUpstairs * this is the entry for yesterday, the 28th. Although the raid may have been conducted on the 25th. In the transfer from oral tradition to written work there is some discrepancy over the date. 4w
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TheKidUpstairs
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Thanks @kspenmoll for the tag!

1. Tagged! Borrowed straight away from Libby, sounds right up my alley!

2. The Colony by Audrey McGee. Beautifully written, wonderful sense of place, will stay with me for a long time.

3. NYC, Australia, London

#WondrousWednesday @Eggs

@Cupcake12 wanna play?

Eggs Thanks for playing 🤗 1mo
Cupcake12 Just posted mine. Thanks @TheKidUpstairs 1mo
36 likes2 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
Jane Eyre | Charlotte Bront
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#OnThisDay in 1847 Charlotte Bronte finished writing Jane Eyre. She spent the previous year writing it at a dining room table, joined by her sisters. They were working on books of their own: Agnes Grey and Wuthering Heights. Oh, to be a fly on THAT wall! Jane Eyre was published less than eight weeks later, on October 16, under the pseudonym Currer Bell. It was an instant bestseller, fans included William Makepeace Thakerey and Queen Victoria.

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TheKidUpstairs
Androcles and the Lion | George Bernard Shaw
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#OnThisDay in 1962, a bi-alphabetic version of George Bernard Shaw's "Androcles and the Lion" was published in England, as directed by the terms of his will. Shaw desired a new alphabet to promote increased clarity and literacy, and had left money in his will for its creation, with the stipulations it should be at least 40 letters, as phonetic as possible, and distinct from the Latin alphabet. ?

TheKidUpstairs The Shavian alphabet was created by 4 men, and the remaining funds were put into publishing Androcles in both Latin and Shavian scripts. #HistoryGetsLIT 1mo
38 likes1 stack add1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
Our Wives Under the Sea | Julia Armfield
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I read this one for #CampLitsy while I was away last week in the middle of nowhere. Over all I quite liked it (I'll save my review to avoid spoilers for those who are better at following schedules than I am! ?)

But sometimes little things jump out and get under my skin. As a resident of Durham Region, "... not far from the Durham Region of Southern Ontario" while technically true, is a really odd way to describe the location of Lake Simcoe.

rabbitprincess Yeah, that is a weird way to describe it… I would be more inclined to describe it as X amount of drive time north of Toronto. 1mo
Kitta I actually read this while at Lake Simcoe and yes that‘s a weird description! 1mo
TheKidUpstairs @rabbitprincess @Kitta I'm glad I'm not the only one who found it odd! It feels like she just looked at a map and picked something at random, but had no real knowledge (or research) of the area. 1mo
52 likes3 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
A Deadly Inside Scoop | Abby Collette
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Hey @Blerdgal_Fenix I know I'm late, but I'm really enjoying this cozy mystery! It's got everything I want in a cozy: fun, interesting, and sometimes wacky characters; a great setting; an intriguing mystery; and yummy food descriptions! I really like Win and her family. I'm about to finish it with a Gin Smash and a lake view 🤗

I've got some ideas for a September read (I'm thinking fantasy for September), I'll email you!

BethM This sounds good! 1mo
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1910 the Buenos Aires Convention was signed by International authorities in, you guessed it, Buenos Aires. Long pages of legalese short, it allows for mutual recognition of copyrights across borders, provided the work showed a statement of such rights ("All rights reserved" being the most common such statement). It allows authors' work to be shared and sold internationally without losing their rights. #HistoryGetsLIT

Megabooks Cool! 1mo
58 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
The Fortsas Bibliohoax ... [A Jeu D'esprit by R.H.G. Chalon.] With a Reprint of the Fortsas Catalogue and Bibliographical Notes and Comment by Weber DeVore | Walter Klinefelter, Renier Hubert Ghislain Chalon, Weber DE VORE, Jean Nepomucne Auguste PICHAULD (Count de Fortsas.)
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(AUGUST 10) #OnThisDay in 1840 booksellers and bibliophiles from across Europe gathered in Belgium for the auction of the rare book collection held by the recently deceased Jean Nepomucene Auguste Pichauld, Comte de Fortsas. There was one slight glitch in their plans. No such man existed. Neither did the auction house or notaries listed on the brochure. And there was no such collection. (Cont'd in comments)

TheKidUpstairs Now known as The Fortsas Hoax, it was all an elaborate prank carried out by restored military officer Renier Hubert Ghislain Chalon. #HistoryGetsLIT 2mo
kspenmoll WOW! 2mo
wanderinglynn That‘s crazy! 2mo
TheKidUpstairs That should say retired military officer, not restored! 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
Walden | Henry David Thoreau
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#OnThisDay in 1854 Thoreau's reflection on life in nature, Walden, was published. Thoreau lived on Emerson's Walden Pond for over two years. He was known to locals as "woods burner" for the 300-acre forest fire he started shortly before moving in (oops!). He left the pond in 1847, and spent the next seven years finishing his work. #HistoryGetsLIT

sprainedbrain 😂 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
The Trees: A Novel | Percival Everett
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Pickpick

Pardon the language: Holy Shit.

I raved through this one in a day and a half. A crime procedural with pitch-black satire, Everett really makes you think and question the history that was, and the history that is being written. He deftly handles the twisted and turns, manages to make you laugh and then immediately delivers a gut punch on the next page.

I'll be thinking about this one for a long time.

TheKidUpstairs CW: This book confronts the brutality of America's past and present racism. The n-word is used quite often (in context). There are brutally violent murder scenes. 2mo
jlhammar Yes! Loved this one so much. Really happy this one made the #Booker2022 longlist. 2mo
BarbaraBB Such a good book ! 2mo
59 likes3 comments
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1973 a lasagna loving, slightly cantankerous orange cat got a new frenemy. The happy go lucky dog Odie was introduced to the world of Garfield comics. Named after a car commercial written by Garfield creator Jim Davis, Odie wasn't originally Jon's dog, but instead belonged to his roommate Lyman until he disappeared from the strip - the dog stayed. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
The Trees: A Novel | Percival Everett
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"If you want to know a place, you talk to its history"

#BookerLonglist2022

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TheKidUpstairs
In Memoriam | Alfred Lord Tennyson
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#OnThisDay in 1809 poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson was born. The British Poet Laureate for much of Queen Victoria's reign, Tennyson is responsible for (among other things) the oft-quoted phrase: "better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all." In fact, he is the ninth most quoted person in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
Hawthorne and Melville: Writing a Relationship | Leland S. Person, Jana L. Argersinger
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#OnThisDay in 1850 Herman Melville went for a hike on Monument Mountain (he was writing a book at the time, just a little story about a whale). Along the way he met a man by the name of Nathaniel Hawthorne (you may have heard of him?). A sudden rainstorm sent them into the shelter of a cave and a long, wandering conversation. Some say Melville fell in love. Maybe they both did? #HistoryGetsLIT

Bookzombie So interesting! 2mo
kspenmoll Thank you for all this posts- I have gone back over them & they are so informative, fun to read! I appreciate the research involved! 2mo
TheKidUpstairs @kspenmoll thank you so much! I'm glad you're enjoying them 🤗 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1821 the Saturday Evening Post began publication as a weekly magazine. Perhaps best known for giving Norman Rockwell his first big break as an illustrator, the Post also featured fiction, non fiction, and poetry in its pages. P.G. Wodehouse credited the magazine with breaking his career, and Jack London's The Call of the Wild was first serialized in the Past in 1903. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
Olympus, Texas | Stacey Swann
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@melissajayne sorry for the delay, this is on its way to you as of yesterday! All the best. #LMPBC

melissajayne Thanks. 2mo
33 likes1 comment
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TheKidUpstairs
The Fire Next Time | James Baldwin
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#OnThisDay in 1924 author James Baldwin was born in NYC. As a teenager, Baldwin followed in the footsteps of his stepfather and worked as a preacher. A meeting with artist Beauford Delaney at age 15 showed him a glimmer of what was possible, a Black man could make a life as an artist. In his 20s Baldwin escaped from the sociopolitical pressures of life in America as a Black man and moved to France, where he wrote most of his works. #HistoryGetsLIT

Graywacke ❤️ 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
Divine Comedy | Dante Aligieri
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#OnThisDay in 1451 a manuscript of Dante's Divine Comedy was sold in London. The manuscript (now known as MS Hamilton 207) is known to have changed hands from one Italian merchant to another while in London, and is the first copy of the Commedia to be definitively placed in Britain. Marginalia includes the note: "I bought this book in London'' with further notation suggesting the date acquired. It now resides in Berlin. #HistoryGetsLIT

Graywacke ❤️ 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
Organizing for Work | Henry Laurence Gantt
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#OnThisDay in 1919 American Publishing firm Harcourt, Brace and Howe was founded in San Diego. After Alfred Harcourt and Donald Brace met at Columbia, they worked for Henry Holt and Co before founding their own firm. They became the American Publishing firm for internationally renowned authors such as Sinclair Lewis, Virginia Woolf, T.S Eliot, and George Orwell. Pictured and tagged book was their first official publication #HistoryGetsLIT

Sapphire As in the Gantt chart?! 2mo
TheKidUpstairs @Sapphire yes, same Gantt! 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1790 Henry James Pye was named Poet Laureate for the UK. As per his Wikipedia page: "His appointment owed nothing to poetic achievement, and was probably a reward for political favours. Pye was merely a competent prose writer, who fancied himself as a poet, earning the derisive label of poetaster." Indeed, one British historian called him "the worst Poet Laureate in English history" #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1916 American literary critic, essayist, and novelist Elizabeth Hardwick was born in Lexington KY. Hardwick burst into the public sphere with a piece in Harper's in 1959 "The Decline of Book Reviewing", applying harsh criticism to the periodicals of the day. Three years later Hardwick, along with Robert Lowell, Jason Epstein, Barbara Epstein, and Robert B. Silvers founded The New York Review of Books. #HistoryGetsLIT

TheKidUpstairs Photograph by Max Vadukul 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
Faulkner and Film | Peter Lurie, Ann J. Abadie
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#OnThisDay in 1942 author William Faulkner entered the Warner Bros lot for his first day working as a screenwriter for the Studio. While his work has received much critical acclaim, money did not follow and he thought taking a job in film would increase his fortunes (literally). As a screenwriter, Faulkner had a hand in some big name Warner Bros pics including To Have and Have Not, and The Big Sleep. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
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When your small town suddenly gets name dropped in your current read!

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TheKidUpstairs
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Pickpick

I likely never would have picked this one up if it weren't for #CampLitsy, so I'm thankful to everyone for choosing it.

A serious of interconnected stories, that together provide a meditation on how we cope with loss, how we grieve, and how we take our next steps. It is beautiful and heartbreaking (thank you @vivastory for the advance warning, these stories are emotional). There are elements of sci-fi, but it is very much a human story 👇

TheKidUpstairs ... contrasting the individual experience of death with the collective, and examining how they overlap and delving into the cracks where humanity falters or soars. This is one that will sit on my heart for quite some time. 2mo
vivastory Terrific review! I was really impacted by it as well 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
The Call of the Wild | Jack London
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#OnThisDay in 1897 the Klondike gold rush had captured the hearts and dreams of countless men and women, and a group embarked from California to try their luck in the north. Among them was 21 year old Jack London. He never did find the precious metal, but you could say he still struck gold. What he found were stories, and those stories made him a household name synonymous with adventure in the Yukon. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
Three Musketeers | Alexandre Dumas
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#OnThisDay in 2002, celebrations began in France to honour what would have been the 200th birthday of author Alexandre Dumas. The celebrations would continue throughout the year, culminating in Dumas' ashes being interred in the Pantheon to lie in honour with other great authors of France. Then President Jacques Chirac acknowledged the racism that had kept the celebrated author from his rightful place of rest. #HistoryGetsLIT

vlwelser ❤ one of my favorites. 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1961 Lenny Bruce stepped on a stage and uttered a phrase that has stuck in the cultural lexicon to such a degree that I'd be willing to bet most of us have heard of, read it, or used it. We credit Shakespeare with so many creative entries to the English language, but "yada yada" is all Lenny. And it all started 71 years ago. (Despite popular belief, Seinfeld didn't start it, he just added an extra "yada") #HistoryGetsLIT

TheKidUpstairs This is the entry for the 23rd. And yes, I was extremely tempted to use a pic of Luke Kirby from Mrs Maisel because 🔥🔥🔥, but alas it felt more appropriate to actually put Lenny up there. 2mo
Ruthiella Good to know! 2mo
Leftcoastzen Love this post ! Nice photo of Lenny but totally agree with your flames for Luke Kirby as Lenny! 🔥🔥🔥 2mo
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staci.reads @TheKidUpstairs I love Mrs. Maisel and Kirby's Lenny Bruce! ❤️ 2mo
rubyslippersreads @Leftcoastzen @staci.reads @TheKidUpstairs No disrespect meant to Lenny, but I‘d rather look at Luke. 😍 (edited) 1mo
Leftcoastzen @rubyslippersreads 👏😂👍❤️ 1mo
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay (or perhaps another) in 1284 (some say 1376, or it may have been never) 100 children disappeared from the German town of Hamelin. Only small hints of the truth remain, but the tale it inspired is legendary. From the Brothers Grimm to Robert Browning many have told the tale of the Pied Piper luring away the rats and children of Hamelin. Some sources say the true events occurred on this day, some point to the 26th of June. #HistoryGetsLIT

TheKidUpstairs (I was away for a long weekend, this entry is for the 22nd) 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
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And this afternoon's reading view! 💙🏖🏕

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TheKidUpstairs
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This morning's reading view 💚🌱🌿🌳🌲

Cailey_Mac The absolute best! 2mo
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TheKidUpstairs
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#OnThisDay in 1959 a landmark decision was made in the NY Courts that would forever alter US obscenity laws. Earlier that year Grove Press sued the Post Office for confiscating copies of Lady Chatterley's Lover. Lawyer Charles Rembar successfully argued that social and literary merits of the work superceded the sexual content. Rembar would go on to successfully argue for overturning bans in Tropic of Cancer, Fanny Hill, and more. #HistoryGetsLIT

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TheKidUpstairs
Cambridge University Press Bookstore | Cambridge, United Kingdom (Bookstore)
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#OnThisDay in 1534 Cambridge University Press was granted a letters patent by King Henry VIII, making it the oldest University press in the world. The first book published through the Press was 1584's Two Treatises of the Lord His Holie Supper. Head over to Twitter to help celebrate this 488th birthday! https://twitter.com/CambridgeUP/status/1549760508412284930?t=tqKAXZoa-bsJK5D2yVj... #HistoryGetsLIT