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BarbaraJean
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I don't know why posts from the Cincinnati and Hamilton County Public Library are popping up in my Facebook feed (I live in California), but I'm not mad about it. This is amazing.

There are some strong contenders here, but I think my votes would go towards Rolled Dahl, Shelf Silverstein, Wheel Gaiman, and The Tell-Tale Cart.

Ruthiella They are all pretty good! 😂 1d
dabbe 🤩🤩🤩 21h
31 likes2 comments
quote
BarbaraJean
Complete Journals of L.M. Montgomery: The PEI Years, 1889-1900 | Mary Henley Rubio, Elizabeth Hillman Waterston
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For downright stupidity these church socials “take the cake.” The main things to do seem to be,
1. Sit prim.
2. Look demure or disapproving according to your age.
3. Hang back and act cranky in any game other people try to get up.
4. Cram yourself with a lot of indigestible stuff, the effects of which will be ever present with you for a week.

😂 I wonder what the age cutoff is for looking disapproving?
#LMMJournals #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead

LeahBergen I‘m probably in that age group right now. 😆 3d
lauraisntwilder I haven't looked demure for a couple decades! 😂 2d
TheAromaofBooks I may have been born in the disapproving group 😂 2d
See All 8 Comments
dabbe 😂😂😂 2d
BarbaraJean @LeahBergen @lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks 😂😂 Maybe we need a t-shirt: “Disapproving according to my age” 1d
lauraisntwilder I would wear that!! 21h
rubyslippersreads I‘ll bet LMM looked disapproving as often as she looked demure. 😏 21h
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @laurainstwilder @BarbaraJean - “Demure on the outside, disapproving on the inside“ 😂 9h
31 likes8 comments
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BarbaraJean
Complete Journals of L.M. Montgomery: The PEI Years, 1889-1900 | Mary Henley Rubio, Elizabeth Hillman Waterston
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Here's the #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead schedule for June & July! For two weeks, we'll return to the #LMMJournals, finishing Volume One. Then we'll have two weeks of #LMMAdjacent reads with some poems that were favorites/influential for LMM. In early July, we'll begin Volume Two of the journals, then we'll have our first #LMMReread with Anne of Green Gables in late July. If you're not tagged & you'd like to be—for some or all of the above—let me know!

Daisey Do you keep separate tag lists? If possible could you keep me on your list of announcements for upcoming reads like this post? I am not going to read the journals currently and don‘t know that I‘ll fit in the next adjacent reads, but I would like to keep up with the schedule, if that makes sense. I had hoped to get to Undine, but not enough time this month. 3d
CogsOfEncouragement Please add me. I‘ve been looking for a reason to reread Anne. These other books you‘ve chosen look really worthwhile. Thanks for hosting! 3d
BarbaraJean @Daisey I do and I will! I‘ll tag you for future schedule/announcement posts. If something pops up that you‘d like to be tagged for the discussion posts, just let me know. (edited) 3d
See All 11 Comments
BarbaraJean @CogsOfEncouragement I‘ll add you to the tag list! I post weekly discussion posts for each week‘s reading, and can tag you for all or just specific reads—let me know if you only want to join for specific reads, or for all! We‘re partway through the first volume of L.M. Montgomery‘s complete journals—I‘ve interspersed adjacent reads and re-reads roughly chronologically where they are mentioned in the journals. 3d
CogsOfEncouragement Count me in for all of them. Thank you! 3d
BarbaraJean @CogsOfEncouragement Will do! Glad to have you on board! 🎉 3d
TheAromaofBooks Yay!! I need to hunt up Wordsworth and Scott!! 3d
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Me too! I have the Wordsworth in a couple of anthologies, but am going to need to check out Lady of the Lake from the library. 3d
lauraisntwilder I'm enjoying being back with Maud this week. 😊 3d
rubyslippersreads I‘m behind on the Journals. 😟 please tag me for everything else. I don‘t know if I‘ll reread AOGG, but I‘ve read it so many times, I‘m sure I can follow along. (edited) 21h
23 likes11 comments
blurb
BarbaraJean
Undine | Friedrich de La Motte Fouque
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LMM first mentions Undine in her journals on October 24, 1899, when Nate brings her a copy—she reads it in school, under her desk, and calls it “delicious.” The story is often referenced as one of LMM‘s favorites.
What do you notice in Undine that might have appealed to LMM?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

lauraisntwilder It has a piety to it that I wasn't expecting. I can see how that would've appealed to LMM, since she also liked Little Women and church was so important in her life. 5d
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder I also think she must have been drawn to the nature descriptions! There were some very lush descriptions of the lake and the location of the fisherman's cottage, as well as the forest and the storms. I could see her reveling in those as well as the emotional drama of the story. 5d
TheAromaofBooks I think the nature connections are definitely a good point @BarbaraJean !! There is also a sort of melodramatic romance to the whole thing that feels a little over-the-top but I can see her getting into, especially when she's young - I think I would have also enjoyed this story more if I read it the first time as an early teen haha It has a sad ending, and it made me think of Anne's Story Club and how that younger age hasn't really experienced ⬇ 4d
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) real grief or trouble, so they tend to enjoy reveling in the melodrama. The whole ending scene I kept remembering Anne's story about the minister's wife who buried children all over the country and wept at their graves haha I actually felt like Kilmeny of the Orchard has definite Undine vibes. (And wasn't Kilmeny's original name Una in the short story she first wrote?) And despite the religious tone throughout, there is also a lot of ⬇ 4d
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) underlying sensuousness to the story. The “good“ beautiful woman vs the “bad“ beautiful woman, the fact that Undine's husband is unfaithful to her and attracted to the forbidden Bertalda, the way both women lose at the end - I can see all of that appealing to LMM, who was very passionate and full of life. @lauraisntwilder 4d
20 likes5 comments
blurb
BarbaraJean
Undine | Friedrich de La Motte Fouque
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What common fairy tale tropes did you notice in Undine?
What did you like (or dislike) about how those fairy tale tropes played out in this story?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

TheAromaofBooks Well, he literally is a knight riding up on a white charger 😂 You also have the changeling aspect, the poor but noble parents, and then the sneaky bad woman stealing away the perfect woman's man. Probably others that aren't coming to mind. They were... fine, I guess? Those tropes are what they are. They didn't really wow me here, but I didn't feel like they were any more ridiculous here than they are in other similar stories haha 4d
20 likes1 comment
blurb
BarbaraJean
Undine | Friedrich de La Motte Fouque
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Hans Christian Andersen didn‘t like how de la Motte Fouqué‘s story made “the mermaid‘s acquiring of an immortal soul to depend upon… the love of a human being. I‘m sure that‘s wrong! It would depend rather much on chance, wouldn‘t it?”

How did you respond to this aspect of the folklore—that Undine‘s receiving a soul is dependent upon her marriage? What did you think of the male & female roles in the story?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

lauraisntwilder It feels a little like "Beauty and the Beast" in that way, with marriage being a marker of having been deemed worthy of love. I'm not sure I like that aspect, but I did like the character of Undine more after she got a soul. 5d
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder I like that connection to Beauty and the Beast! Both characters are given their humanity in a way, once they have been seen as worthy of love. And both feel problematic. I feel similarly to Andersen but probably for different reasons. It bothers me to have the woman's soul be dependent upon approval/bestowal of worth by a man. Andersen has religious issues with it, and I have both spiritual and feminist issues with it! 5d
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder I also thought it was interesting that Undine seems to have far more power before she has a soul. She's so dependent upon Huldbrand after that--as well as vulnerable to Kuhleborn. She has a measure of control over Kuhleborn before her marriage, but far less so afterwards. And then Huldbrand proves to be completely unworthy of her trust and dependence. 5d
TheAromaofBooks I didn't care for the aspect of another person (husband or anyone) having the power to grant her a soul. Like Anderson, I have some religious issues with that one haha Plus she didn't really do anything to “deserve“ it anyway - just looked pretty, basically. It seemed like a strange premise. @lauraisntwilder 4d
lauraisntwilder I agree, it's totally creepy. So is Beauty and the Beast, really. @TheAromaofBooks 3d
17 likes5 comments
blurb
BarbaraJean
Undine | Friedrich de La Motte Fouque
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#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent
🧜‍♀️Undine was first published in German in 1811—the same year as Sense & Sensibility, a year before the Brothers Grimm fairy tales
🧜‍♀️The first English translation was by George Soane (1818)
🧜‍♀️Undine influenced Hans Christian Andersen‘s The Little Mermaid (1837)
🧜‍♀️The Courtney translation (1909) is famous for its illustrations by Arthur Rackham

What translation/version did you read (if you know)?⤵️

BarbaraJean Here‘s a digital version with the Arthur Rackham illustrations:
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Undine_(1909)

Some resources on various versions of the text:
https://books.openedition.org/obp/607?lang=en
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Undine
(edited) 5d
slategreyskies This reminds me of the movie Ondine with Colin Farrell. I wonder if it was based on this story. 5d
BarbaraJean @slategreyskies It‘s been years since I watched that movie, but I‘m sure there was some influence there! There are lots of Undine stories out there and I think this one was the first one that went on to influence lots of others. 5d
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BarbaraJean As far as I can tell, the version I read was the anonymous translation from 1845. I checked it out on Hoopla, and it has introductory essays by George MacDonald and Lafcadio Hearn. It's copyrighted 2020 by Read & Co. Books. I still need to skim through the “Told to the Children“ version from Project Gutenberg I checked out on Libby. It's mentioned in the openedition.org link I posted above as one of several re-tellings for children. 5d
lauraisntwilder I switched between the Courtney translation on Hoopla, with the (gorgeous!) Rackham illustrations (side note, how do I not own any books with Rackham illustrations when I've loved him for years?!) and the Bunnett translation on LibroVox. 5d
TheAromaofBooks I read the Bunnett translation (1867 so it's a possibility for the one LMM would have read). One side note that I enjoyed was that Bunnett took the time to use “thee“ and “thou“ vs “you“ in dialogue, emphasizing how important informal vs formal usage would be in the original language. Circling back to Anderson's Little Mermaid, I think it is very interesting what aspects of this story he decided to keep vs change. @lauraisntwilder 4d
17 likes6 comments
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BarbaraJean
The Book of Joy | Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu
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It‘s been a really busy week, but I have to get my #5JoysFriday post in before Friday is gone!

1. Visiting with family: my sister & 2 of her kids are in town (pictured: my sister with her sweet grandbaby—my grand-niece!)
2. Dinner and great conversation catching up with two long-time friends
3. A beautiful, rich time of spiritual direction training yesterday & today (pictured: larkspur seed pod from a nature reflection today)
⤵️

BarbaraJean (Cont‘d) 4. A sweet, meaningful thank you card from one of the women in my EfM group
5. Finally got to some yard work I‘ve been putting off (not exactly joyful at the time but it gives me joy to have made progress!)
(edited) 6d
DebinHawaii A lovely joys list! 💛💛💛 Loving the time with family & friends! Thanks for sharing & spreading the joy! 🤗 4d
31 likes2 comments
review
BarbaraJean
Butter: Roman | Asako Yuzuki
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Pickpick

I‘m still not sure what I think of this—but kind of in a good way. There‘s a lot here to unpack, from ideas about beauty and socially-imposed female roles, to all the descriptions of food! All against a backdrop of a journalist pursuing a story that quickly (literally?) begins to consume her. I didn‘t like any of the characters, but by the end I was won over. This was SUPER interesting and I‘m excited for the #CampLitsy24 discussion!

squirrelbrain Glad you enjoyed it! I‘m about 30% in so far and intrigued to find out where it will go. 1w
BarbaraBB An intriguing review! I‘ll start the book one of these days! 1w
BarbaraJean @squirrelbrain @BarbaraBB It was an intriguing book! Should make for a good discussion. I had to finish it quickly because it was due back at the library... I was a bad library patron and ended up keeping it an extra few days 😬 1w
Megabooks This sounds like it will make for great discussion! I‘m about 10% in now. 1w
45 likes2 stack adds4 comments
review
BarbaraJean
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Pickpick

A soft pick for Rebecca! With all the #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead and #ChildrensClassicRead2024 discussion, I don‘t have a whole lot more to add. 😊 This is charming and sweet, and Rebecca as a character is delightful. However, the second half of the book was underdeveloped, and the ending felt rushed. Even so, I‘m glad I finally read this classic—it brought me joy (and it was fun to discover and goggle at all the Anne of Green Gables similarities!)

TheBookHippie I agree 💯. 1w
tpixie Great cover! I agree with your review!! 1w
40 likes2 comments
review
BarbaraJean
Iron Widow | Xiran Jay Zhao
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Mehso-so

This was…not great. It‘s fast-paced and engaging, but thin on world-building, and its unlikable characters are thoroughly underdeveloped. The ideas could have been interesting, but it all felt very heavy-handed and clumsy. My husband‘s comment was: “I guess that‘s what happens when you just drag your characters through a story.” Yep. But if you‘re looking for lots of action and violence, some diversity rep…⤵️

BarbaraJean (Cont‘d) …and a simplistic “burn it all down” feminism, with giant mechs and a Chinese culture-influenced world, this has all of that. I saw the twist coming, and the multi-cliffhanger ending annoyed me—because I‘m curious where the next book might go, but I also don‘t think I want to read it. 😬 (edited) 1w
BarbaraJean Forgot to note that this was my May #DoubleSpin @TheAromaofBooks It was also my IRL book club‘s pick for May. We did have a good discussion in spite of the fact that the person who recommended it disagreed with my gripes about it 😂 1w
TheAromaofBooks Great review!!! 1w
36 likes3 comments
review
BarbaraJean
I Cheerfully Refuse | Leif Enger
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Pickpick

Ugggghhh… Leif Enger is SO GOOD. This is absolutely gorgeous: beautifully written and beautifully human, as expected—but I was surprised (in a good way) by its exploration of topics of injustice in a post-apocalyptic landscape. A very different setting from Enger‘s other books, but I loved it just as much. And look at that amazing cover!

Kitta Ooh this is on my list!! 1w
45 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
BarbaraJean
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Pickpick

This had the feel of a fast-paced mystery, but brought up so many intriguing ideas about language and speech and intelligence and the assumptions we make about all of the above. It kept me turning the pages, but also thinking deeply about the issues it raised. I felt similarly about Miracle Creek—now I‘m in for whatever Angie Kim writes!

48 likes1 stack add
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BarbaraJean
BookSpinBingo | Untitled
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Here‘s how I fared in #BookSpinBingo for May: an attempt at a bingo that was thwarted by library holds and buddy read/book club over-commitments 😆 But I finished both #BookSpin and #DoubleSpin and some of those library holds/buddy reads were really good!

Favorites for the month:
📚I Cheerfully Refuse
📚Happiness Falls
📚An Altar in the World

Now to catch up on my reviews… 🫣

TheAromaofBooks Yay!! Fantastic month!!! Dadblamed library holds always appear when they shouldn't 😂 1w
30 likes1 comment
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BarbaraJean
BookSpinBingo | Untitled
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It‘s #BookSpin Day! And my BookSpin pick landed on one of my #192025 categories: a book published in the 1950s or 60s. I‘m trying to pick between these… but with other heavier reads of late, I‘m leaning towards either The Grand Sophy or one of the children‘s books in the bottom row. I‘ll see how I feel once I make some headway in my pile of library books!

TheBookHippie Georgette!!! 2w
rubyslippersreads Time Cat! 😺 2w
Librarybelle I‘d vote for the Heyer! (edited) 2w
See All 10 Comments
willaful Oh man! Some of my favorite books! Linnets and Valerians is really special, but Black Hearts in Battersea is so fun. (Have you read The Wolves of Willoughby Chase?)

I used to have that exact edition of The Grand Sophy.
2w
BarbaraJean @TheBookHippie @Librarybelle Two almost instantaneous votes for Heyer! 😁 @rubyslippersreads Time Cat has been on my list since I read the Prydain Chronicles in high school or college—and it‘s been on my shelf for almost that long! @willaful I will read ALL of these someday!! I read Willoughby Chase as a kid and loved it. This copy of Sophy was a 50-cent library sale find! 🎉It says “Large-Type Edition” and it‘s basically normal size print 😆 2w
rubyslippersreads @willaful I love Linnets and Valerians too. 2w
LeahBergen Heyer AND Linnets! 👏👏 2w
TheAromaofBooks The Grand Sophy is one of my favorite Heyers, so fun and happy. However, I also love Linnets and Valerians. Old Herbaceous was a surprise win that I wasn't sure I would enjoy but I did. Such a gentle story. 1w
peanutnine Time Cat was one of my favorite books in middle school! 1w
41 likes10 comments
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BarbaraJean
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“In the actual—this painful kingdom of time and chance—are Care, Canker, and Sorrow; with thought, with the ideal, is immortal hilarity—the Rose of Joy; round it all the Muses sing.”

I remember LMM quoting and discussing this Emerson quote somewhere, maybe in a letter to MacMillan? Now I need to track it down! It‘s interesting to see it referenced here, in a children‘s book that LMM almost certainly read. #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

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BarbaraJean
Undine | Friedrich de La Motte Fouque
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A reminder that next week, the #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead will be discussing Undine, one of our #LMMAdjacent books. LMM first mentions it in her journal on October 24, 1899–Nate brings her a copy!

As always, all are welcome to join in—if you‘re not tagged and you‘d like to be, please let me know!

Since the book was originally published in German in 1811, there‘s a number of different translations and versions out there. ⤵️

BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks and I got carried away discussing different versions in the comments on this post, if anyone is interested!
https://litsy.com/p/MEpzZ2VjWUxL
2w
BarbaraJean Also: next weekend is super busy for me, so I probably won‘t be able to post questions until late afternoon Pacific Time—at the earliest!—but they‘ll get posted eventually! (edited) 2w
TheAromaofBooks Yay!! I'm honestly excited about this one haha 2w
25 likes1 stack add3 comments
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BarbaraJean
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How did you feel about how the story wrapped up: with “Mr. Aladdin,” with Rebecca‘s aunts, and with Rebecca‘s family at Sunnybrook?

Would you want to read sequels to Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, or a series about Rebecca?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

TheAromaofBooks Just as an aside, this graphic is the same as the last one, so not everyone may realize that you actually asked a different question haha

I actually would be interested in reading sequels to Rebecca. I think the whole book would have been better if it had been two separate books and we could have devoted more time to her at school. I would totally read another book about her teaching adventures (if she has some). Apparently, Wiggin's nephew ⬇
2w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Hahahaha—thank you!! Changing the graphic now!! 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) or someone rewrote the book/added stuff/created a sequel, although the GR reviews seem to agree it's terrible 😂 So I'll probably take a pass. 2w
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lauraisntwilder I would not want to read a sequel. In the absence of literally any other options, I have a feeling Rebecca would end up marrying Mr. Aladdin and I'm not interested in that. 2w
lauraisntwilder Oh, and I thought the ending, especially the actual last lines, was a letdown. It felt very much like the book didn't go anywhere. "There once was a family with too many kids, but then a aunt died and left them a house and they were all fine. Also, one of the kids went to school, but I'm not telling you about it." 2w
lauraisntwilder *aN aunt. 🙄 2w
rubyslippersreads I‘m actually reading the next book in the series, but I wouldn‘t call it a sequel. So far, it‘s just more stories set in the same time frame as the original. 2w
rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks I think I saw those. They seem to be retellings of the book with an emphasis on religion. I‘ll pass too. 2w
rubyslippersreads @lauraisntwilder I agree about Dean Priest, oops, I meant Mr. Aladdin. 🤣 2w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads - It's weird because while this book felt as religious as most books of that era (that is to say, the characters go to church, believe in God, and try to live up to “Christian morals“) it didn't feel like Rebecca was an especially church-focused character. So that seemed like an odd direction to go since it seems like you would have to kind of rewrite her character?? 2w
tpixie I knew Rebecca would end up with ‘ Mr Aladdin‘ , but it felt kind of creepy to me… 1w
tpixie I loved the evolution of Aunt Miranda- and the story of her crush dating and marrying her sister- how sad and brave she was to help her get ready for the dance. 1w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks I agree that if the second half had been fleshed out more, I would have liked the book better. So much of this needed more depth & development! But I'm not interested in the “sequels“ that do exist! @lauraisntwilder Yeah, the book made every indication she would end up with Adam. But I'd read the heck out of a sequel where Adam realizes he should be with Miss Maxwell and Rebecca goes on to have a brilliant teaching career. 1w
BarbaraJean @tpixie Yes, I loved being able to see a glimpse of Aunt Miranda's past and a little of what had made her who she was. It just felt like too little, and tacked on at the end instead of real character development through the novel. Honestly, all of the threads of the ending felt rushed and tacked-on! 1w
tpixie @BarbaraJean I totally agree with that rushed feeling of the ending. 1w
26 likes15 comments
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BarbaraJean
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Any further thoughts on parallels between Rebecca and LMM‘s Anne and Emily books?

And because I‘m super interested in everyone‘s thoughts: how does Adam Ladd compare/contrast with Dean Priest in the Emily books?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

BarbaraJean I have been waiting until I finished Rebecca to listen to this 2-part episode of the Gibson Girl podcast, which discusses the similarities between Rebecca and Anne of Green Gables. Check it out if you‘re interested! https://www.gibsongirlreview.com/season-1-episode-10/ 2w
lauraisntwilder Dean Priest and Adam Ladd both give me the creeps. Dean is definitely worse, Mr. Aladdin made me cringe every time he showed up in the second half. 2w
TheAromaofBooks I definitely think that LMM was influenced by this book. There are too many scenes that overlap for it to be coincidental. However, I don't think she just rewrote this story. So much of Anne is unique, and while she and Rebecca have some similarities, I'm not convinced that LMM based her actual character on Rebecca as much as she borrowed some of Rebecca's circumstances and gave them to Anne. I saw a few GR reviews link to this article ⬇ 2w
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TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) http://canadianicon.org/table-of-contents/mirror-images-anne-of-green-gables-and... and while I agreed with some of it, I also felt like some of their “mirrors“ were a bit of a stretch. For instance, yes Rebecca and Anne both “like nature“ but I never felt like that was an inherent and critical part of Rebecca, while it's hugely a part of Anne - which I think in turn is a reflection of LMM's own passion for trees⬇ 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) and the outdoors. I also didn't actually think that Emma Jane and Diana are much alike, beyond a basic “secondary character“ vibe. Emma Jane literally just feels like Rebecca needs a friend, so here she is, while Diana, once again, is an important part of Anne herself and her character development. The same with Matilda and Marilla - both grumpy old women, I guess, but wildly different in their relationship with the main character and in⬇ 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) the way they each develop (that is to say, Matilda doesn't). I definitely felt like the second half of the book is where Anne and Rebecca really diverge, with Anne having actual purpose, direction, development, and growth, while Rebecca continues to just be the same little girl she was all along - which is part of what adds to the creepiness of Adam Ladd tbh. There are parallels to Dean and Adam, although interestingly I actually found ⬇ 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) myself comparing Adam more to “Daddy Long-Legs“ - a book I do love, but have always felt like Daddy pulled the strings in the background to put Judy into situations where she would be maneuvered into falling in love with him. Dean's grooming feels much more active, with a personal correspondence and regular visits/discussions/etc. Adam is more in the background creating scenarios where Rebecca will be obligated/grateful/admire him. 2w
rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks Diana is much more of a kindred spirit to Anne than Emma Jane is to Rebecca. 2w
rubyslippersreads @lauraisntwilder I agree. Although when I first read these two books (probably at about age 10), any idea of possible “romance” with the older men went right over my head. (Thank goodness!) 2w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads - I agree! I don't feel like we ever see a real bond between Rebecca and Emma Jane beyond them being the same age and going to school at the same time, while Anne and Diana are genuinely involved and interested in each other's lives. And Anne definitely has a deep love for Diana that Rebecca never seems to show for Emma Jane. 2w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @lauraisntwilder - I feel like if I had read this book at a younger age I wouldn't have thought of Adam as a love interest. The signs are there as an adult reader, but he seems much more subtle of a character than Dean. 2w
rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks @lauraisntwilder I think the times were much different then, too. A wealthy husband would probably have been thought an excellent “catch” for Rebecca. The age difference might have even been considered a plus, because Rebecca was so “flighty.” 😏 2w
rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks @lauraisntwilder Dean Priest isn‘t subtle at all, and he gets creepier as the story goes on. Aunt Nancy warned Emily, “Never marry a Priest.” 😂 2w
lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads As a kid, I definitely wouldn't have picked up on Adam Ladd as a love interest, which makes it even creepier to me as an adult. Meanwhile, yes, bless Aunt Nancy, Dean was overtly interested in Emily. So gross. 2w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks The influence of Rebecca on Anne is undeniable! But I agree, LMM didn‘t just rewrite it. I like the idea that LMM borrowed some of Rebecca‘s circumstances & gave them to Anne. That early drive with Mr. Cobb/Matthew has so many similarities, but Anne & Rebecca are still distinctly different personalities. The podcast I linked above talks about how Anne is more impulsive and acts out of emotion, while Rebecca tends to be more ⬇ 1w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) reflective & considers her responses. Anne‘s “scrapes” are not at all like Rebecca‘s—I think that‘s one of the reasons why. I saw that “Mirror Images” article, too! Definitely, Anne‘s feelings for nature are SO different from Rebecca‘s. Their sense of home & place is different, too. Anne literally mourns the loss of beloved places. Rebecca saying goodbye to Sunnybrook is a very casual farewell compared to how it would have felt for Anne! 1w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads I did see some parallels with Emma Jane and Diana in that they both kind of get dragged along into their main-character friend‘s escapades. They‘re not the instigator, they‘re not imaginative, but they‘re loyal to their more passionate, dynamic, front-and-center friend. But the emotional impact of Diana in Anne‘s life is FAR different. Partly because Anne actually grows and changes!! 1w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks I like the Daddy Long-Legs comparison! Still ooky, but far different from the grooming and emotional manipulation we see with Dean. Adam is a LOT more subtle, but it's also that he seems more considerate of what‘s appropriate because of Rebecca‘s age. I appreciated how he always includes Emma Jean so he‘s not singling out Rebecca. That‘s FAR different than Dean‘s possessiveness. 1w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @ lauraisntwilder Like all of you, I wouldn‘t have seen Adam as a love interest if I‘d read this as a kid. But it bothers me now!! I get that the times were different, but I just can‘t be OK with a 30-something man looking at a 10 or 12-year-old kid and thinking “heeeeeyyy, wife material.” 1w
22 likes20 comments
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BarbaraJean
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Please join us to discuss the second half of Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm! #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

What did you think about the second half of the book, focusing on Rebecca‘s school years in Wareham? Any favorite scenes or quotes?

What growth and change do you see in Rebecca during her time at Wareham? (Or does she change?)

lauraisntwilder The second half moved too quickly. It felt like we were rushing to the end. And I didn't particularly like the ending! 2w
TheAromaofBooks I definitely liked the first half better than the second. The second half felt a lot choppier and less cohesive. I actually usually really enjoy school stories, but it almost didn't even feel like Rebecca was at school half the time?? It felt weird that all this time and money was spent without much of a goal (I guess so she could be a teacher) and then she just comes back and starts nursing various family members instead of using the education ⬇ 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) that the aunts sacrificed so much for?? I don't know, it was just kind of odd. I also definitely like Adam should be marrying the teacher instead of waiting for Rebecca to grow up, ick. There were parts and characters that I enjoyed, but overall the second half felt jumbled and rushed, and the ending seemed really abrupt. Like @lauraisntwilder I didn't really care for the ending. 2w
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sblbooks @lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks I agree. The ending did feel rush they tried to pack too much into one book this could have been a series for sure. The "age gap"romance in these books...why is that a thing? ? 2w
rubyslippersreads I wanted Adam to marry the teacher too. I agree that the first half of the book was better than the second. 2w
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder I thought it moved too quickly as well. It skips her whole 2nd year! @TheAromaofBooks The 2nd half felt both disjointed and “thin“ to me. I felt like the ending wanted to show her willingness to sacrifice her bright prospects out of gratitude for all the aunts had done for her/love for her family. But the emotional connection wasn't there because we didn't really see her school accomplishments or a deep connection to her family! 2w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @sblbooks I hadn't thought about Adam marrying the teacher, but that would have been SO much better and less creepy!! I get that the age gap was far more common/acceptable at the time, but it's the “Oh I'll wait for her to grow up“ idea that bothers me so much!! The age gap wouldn't be as creepy if they'd met later. 2w
TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean - That's the thing about the age gap to me, it's the “I have met this literal child and will now mold her into the wife I want to have in the future“ - more so in Emily, but a bit here as well. The actual difference in age wouldn't feel as bad if they met when the girl was already an adult. 1w
sblbooks @TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean Exactly! I guess the proper term would be grooming rather than age gap. 1w
TheAromaofBooks @sblbooks - Yes!! My husband and I are actually ten years apart and we get along great. But we didn't meet until I was 27, had dated other people, graduated from college, had a job, etc. - I was already my own person. This idea of molding a child so she turns into the ideal wife is pretty creepy. 1w
tpixie @rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks totally agree - the teacher & Adam are much more appropriate- and the ending was rushed. 1w
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BarbaraJean
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“It isn‘t as if the heathen really needed me; I‘m sure they‘ll come out all right in the end… whatever God is, and wherever He is, He must always be there, ready and waiting.”

There are some awful stereotypes in the latter half of Rebecca‘s comments here, but I appreciate her underlying theology! #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

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BarbaraJean
Happy Litsyversary! | Special Events
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Just drew the winner for my little Litsyversary giveaway! I put all the names into this little bowl, stirred them around, shook it a little, and one slip of paper JUMPED out—making the definitive winner: @TheSpineView !

Thank you to everyone who entered and shared the things you love about Litsy!! From random acts of kindness, book discoveries, and readalongs, to wonderful friendships—feeling understood and finding “our” people ⤵️

BarbaraJean (Cont‘d) …in this genuinely kind, friendly, wholesome, supportive, thoughtful and judgment-free community! 💜📚💜📚 I love this little corner of the socials so much, for all the reasons you each listed. Thank you for making it such a lovely place. @TheSpineView - please email me at barbarajanettewood at gmail with your address, and let me know if I should pick a book from your Litsy TBR or a different wishlist. Thank you all!! 🤗 2w
AmyG Congrats @TheSpineView 🎉 2w
monalyisha Yay! This community‘s such a great collaboration of bookish love. Congrats! 2w
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TheSpineView Wow! What a surprise! And thank you so much! I shoot you an email. 2w
TheSpineView @AmyG Thanks! 2w
LiteraryinLawrence 💗💗💗 2w
Amiable We‘re all winners by virtue of being part of Litsy! 😍 2w
Ruthiella Congratulations @TheSpineView ! 🥳🥳🥳 2w
BarbaraJean @monalyisha It really is—it brings me such joy. @Amiable Yes!! This!! 2w
BarbaraJean @TheSpineView You‘re so welcome! I will be checking my email and checking your TBRs!! (edited) 2w
dabbe Congrats @TheSpineView! 💙🩵💙 2w
TheSpineView @dabbe Thanks! 2w
julieclair Love this! 2w
45 likes13 comments
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BarbaraJean
BookSpinBingo | Untitled
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I‘m not ready for it to be June, but I do have my June #BookSpin list ready!

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 2w
35 likes1 comment
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BarbaraJean
Happy Litsyversary! | Special Events
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A little reminder—in celebration of my 8th Litsyversary last week, I‘m doing a little giveaway to give back to this community I love! If you‘d like to enter, comment below with something you love about Litsy. I‘ll draw a name tomorrow (which is eight days from my eighth Litsyversary!) and will send the winner a book from their Litsy TBR (or other preferred wish list). 📚💜📚

TheSpineView Happy Litsyversary!! Thanks for doing a giveaway and acts of random kindness like this is most favorite thing about Litsy. 2w
merelybookish Congrats on 8 years! I'm in Canada, so not sure if I qualify, but I love the friends I have made on Litsy! 2w
AmyG Congrats! 8 years, Wow! I love Litsy for the community…the friends I‘ve made, the books I learn about. Just a wonderful, kind place. (Thank you for the giveaway). 2w
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Jess_Read_This 💐Congrats on 8 years! Wow time flies! I didn‘t realize Litsy was 8 years old. I love the genuine kindness and interactions I have with other book lovers here. It‘s always a pleasure to check in on the app and I leave it feeling happier. Which says a lot about this social media app! 🩷 2w
BarbaraJean @merelybookish I didn't even think about international when I posted this last week 😆 But I should have put “open worldwide“—I don't want to limit it! 2w
Princess-Kingofkings 8 years! Congratulations 🍾 Like @TheSpineView & @AmyG & @Jess_Read_This Kindness is the reason I love Litsy the most. ☺️ 2w
quietjenn Congrats! I love the community - how friendly and thoughtful everyone is. Also a big fan of readalongs with like-minded people. 2w
BookmarkTavern Happy Litsyversary! 🎉🎉🎉 2w
TheLudicReader Eight years! What I love about Litsy is that there is no real acrimony, even when we don‘t agree. 2w
Hooked_on_books I love all the people who love books the way I do. I feel understood in a way I don‘t elsewhere. I‘m normal here! 😬 2w
39 likes10 comments
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BarbaraJean
Butter: Roman | Asako Yuzuki
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So… the murderer in this book is described as “neither young nor beautiful,” and she weighs “over 70 kilos.” And an earlier comment says: “It‘s a miracle that someone that fat could con so many people into wanting to marry her!”

I never remember the kilo to pound ratio, so I looked it up. 154 pounds. She weighs over 154 pounds. That‘s how “fat” she is. 😳😐🙄

#CampLitsy24

julesG Doesn't sound like much to me, unless she's very short. 2w
Amiable 😖 2w
BarbaraBB That isn‘t even much for a Japanese I think. Very annoying those things. 2w
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Megabooks Definitely not fat! #annoying 🙄 2w
Hooked_on_books There were some bits of fat-shaming for not fat people in this book that irked me. But when it starts with the main character, keep with it, is all I‘ll say. 🫢 2w
squirrelbrain How annoying! Intrigued by your comment though @Hooked_on_books 2w
Suet624 The way she talks about how little women eat there, I assume that weight is more than most. 2w
Aimeesue 😳 2w
dabbe 😱 2w
BarbaraJean @JulesG @BarbaraBB @Suet624 I'm sure there's a cultural component going on with Japanese standards of beauty, but I was very taken aback with seeing this particular number! @Hooked_on_books I'm into Chapter Two now... I keep thinking the emphasis on weight has faded into the background and then there will be another offhanded “fat“-shaming comment. 🙄 But the story has me hooked! 2w
Ruthiella I just read the first chapter where it states she‘s 5 foot five inches. 150 lbs is not fat at this height, IMO. 2w
julesG @Ruthiella had to translate that into the metric system. So she's 165 centimetres and 70 kilograms. 2w
BarbaraBB I am taken aback too, I can‘t imagine someone writing that today. I‘ll read the book next week. 2w
monkeygirlsmama Listening to this a #audiobook right now and I did the same thing. And, yeah, pretty cheeky concept, but it is Japan so it makes sense they focus on thin as beautiful. 2w
42 likes14 comments
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BarbaraJean
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A #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead reminder for the next couple weeks! We have two upcoming #LMMAdjacent discussions:
Saturday, June 1: Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm by Kate Douglas Wiggin (Chapters 16-end)
Saturday, June 8: Undine by Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué

My library doesn‘t have any print copies of Undine, but I‘ve found a bunch of digital versions on Libby and Hoopla. It‘s in the public domain, so it‘s also available via Project Gutenberg, etc.

TheAromaofBooks Yay!! I have no idea what to expect from this one! 2w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Me neither! I actually checked out two digital versions from the library last night! The one I got via Libby is from Project Gutenberg and is from a series called “Told to the Children.“ I'm skeptical because the text looks very different from the one I got on Hoopla. And it SAYS it has illustrations, but each link in the “List of Pictures“ goes to a point in the text where there should be an illustration—but there isn't. 🙄 ⬇ 2w
BarbaraJean The one I got on Hoopla looks more promising, and it has a couple of introductory essays (one by George MacDonald). Trying to decide whether to read those before or after the story. I hate it when intros have spoilers, and they so often do with older books! 2w
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julieclair Everand had an ebook version with the Arthur Rackham illustrations. I‘ll be reading that! 😀 2w
TheAromaofBooks @BarbarJean @julieclair - Many of these public domain books are being printed by Amazon publishers (or whatever you want to call them lol) in inexpensive paperback copies, so that's what I got. I think part of the difference in editions may also be different translators? I believe this was actually originally written in German. Mine is translated by Fanny Elizabeth Bunnett. With a name like Fanny, I'm assuming it's an old translation 😂 2w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Of course different translations! 🤦🏻‍♀️ I wonder which one LMM would have read… 2w
TheAromaofBooks I'm not completely sure how public domain works with translated books. Is it the original German text that is in the public domain and anyone can translate it? Or it is some of the early English translations that are now in the public domain? After nosing about a little I did find this list - https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Undine - which shows the years and translators, but I can't imagine these are the only ones. However, that means my edition ⬇ (edited) 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) translated by Bunnett is 1867. From what I've read, the illustrated version by Courtney, published in 1909, is the most popular. While trying to find out more about your “Told to the Children“ edition, I ended up on this GR page - read the “about the author“ section - https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15981399-stories-from-the-ballads-told-to-th... - she co-wrote a book with LMM! Her name did start to ring a bell in that ⬇ 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) context. Side note - scanning through the books she wrote there's one called “Dante for the Children“ 😂 😂 😂 I may have to get a copy of that!!! All that to say, it looks like there are several options for which translation LMM would have read. (I don't think she knew German, did she? There's always the outside chance she read it in the original language!), but probably NOT the Courtney or MacGregor versions - at least not at first - ⬇ 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) since those weren't published until the 1900s. Who translated your Hoopla edition, does it say? Looking back at the Amazon description of the edition I bought, the description says “An unabridged English translation of the story by William Leonard Courtney and illustrated by Arthur Rackham was published in 1909.“ But if you look the edition you're purchasing is translated by Bunnett. So that's not confusing😆 But there are a lot of ⬇ 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) editions available with Rackham's illustrations - I think those are what made that edition so popular. Apparently, they're kind of creepy haha One last note, what was really crazy to me reading this was the statement that THIS story came BEFORE Hans Christian Anderson wrote The Little Mermaid! He claims it as one of his influences for that story. Kind of wild. Anyway, I've rambled enough. It's just so interesting!!! 😂 2w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks With public domain, I think it‘s the translation itself that enters public domain once the translation‘s copyright date hits that threshold. It makes sense that the translation that appeared with the famous illustrations is the most popular! I‘d love to find a copy that mirrors that one, although that's not the one LMM read (at least not originally), since she first mentions Undine in her journals in 1889 (Oct. 24). I wonder if ⬇ 2w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) LMM read the Bunnett translation you have—it would have been the most recently published! But it really could have been ANY of those other than the Courtney. That Wikisource list is really helpful—I hadn‘t found a list of English translations yet! However, it doesn‘t clear up who translated either of the versions I have. 😂 Neither one has a publication date or any info about the translator. I figured both used one of the ⬇ 2w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) anonymous translations and started trying to match up the text using the Wikisource list. The Hoopla version seems to be the 1845 anonymous translation. But the “Told to the Children” one reads like a simplified version, so it looks like Mary Macgregor adapted an anonymous translation for kids. She‘s listed as the “Editor” on the copyright page of this version, and she‘s not listed as a translator of any of the versions on Wikisource. ⬇ 2w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) The differences between hers and the other texts are not translation-type differences! Here are the opening sentences of the two I have:
Hoopla (pub by Read & Co.): “On a beautiful evening, many hundred years ago, a worthy old fisherman sat mending his nets. The spot where he dwelt was exceedingly picturesque. The green turf on which he had built his cottage ran far out into a great lake; and this slip of verdure appeared to stretch...“ ⬇
2w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) ...into it as much through love of its clear waters as the lake, moved by a like impulse, strove to fold the meadow, with its waving grass and flowers, and the cooling shade of the trees, in its embrace of love. They seemed to be drawn toward each other, and the one to be visiting the other as a guest.“
Then the Macgregor version: “A fisherman brought a stool to the doorway of his home and, sitting down, he began to mend his nets. ⬇
2w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) ...His cottage stood in the midst of green meadows, and his eyes grew glad as he looked at the green grass. After the heat of the fair summer‘s day it was so cool, so refreshing.“
The Macgregor is SO abbreviated! I looked up the Bunnett version, and it's very similar to the Hoopla version (1845?). AND—it is so fascinating that Mary Macgregor of my “Told to the Children” edition was friends with LMM and co-authored a book with her!!! ⬇
2w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) Like you, reading that author description brought back vague recollections for me, from Rubio's discussions of other Canadian women writers. Honestly, I had dismissed reading the Macgregor version, but now the LMM connection makes me want to read both! (Dante for the Children?! 😂😂) I do want to look up the Rackham illustrations as I read, creepy or not 😂 Also: super interesting that this story influenced Hans Christian Andersen! 2w
TheAromaofBooks Definitely sounds like MacGregor is “retelling“ rather than translating! I'm getting the impression that she did a whole series of children's versions of various tales. Although why she would think Dante was important to tackle is beyond me 😂 I read the first chapter of Undine today and it was really intriguing!!! I'm excited to see where this story is going to go. Also, I was reading the first chapter of Little Women for #HashtagBrigade and ⬇ 2w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) couldn't believe that Jo mentions wanting to get a copy of Undine!!!! 2w
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BarbaraJean
East of Eden | John Steinbeck
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I just noticed this tiny pig emblem on the back of my library copy of East of Eden, and was fascinated—I had to look up the meaning of the motto. And I found this: Pigasus! Ad Astra Per Alia Porci: to the stars on the wings of a pig. Earthbound but aspiring. I love it!

https://www.sjsu.edu/steinbeck/resources/biography/pigasus.php

#RandomClassics

Ruthiella 😂😂😂 🐖🐖🐖 3w
Amiable That‘s so interesting! I never knew any of that about Steinbeck. 3w
TheAromaofBooks Oh I love this!! And what a great motto. 3w
41 likes3 comments
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BarbaraJean
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So far—what similarities do you see between Anne of Green Gables and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm? Do these feel more like similar genre conventions or more like borrowing/copying?
To what extent are these kinds of similarities excusable, and when do they cross the line from “influenced by” into plagiarism? Where is that line for you?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent

julieclair So many similarities… both girls are spunky little chatterboxes, they‘re smart, and natural leaders. They both have left situations where they were caring for several younger children, and have come to live with 2 older adults, siblings who have never been parents, one of whom is strict and the other more kindly. This is my first time reading Rebecca, and I kept thinking, “Wow, the author sure did borrow a lot from LMM.” Then I checked the copy ⬇️ 3w
julieclair right dates and saw that Rebecca was written first, in 1903. Anne was written in 1908. So if there was any borrowing, it was the other way around. That gave me some pause, lol! This doesn‘t feel like actual plagiarism to me - can‘t exactly say why - but it does feel like copying. It makes me a bit uncomfortable on LMM‘s behalf. 😕 3w
Sace It has been so long since I read Anne of Green Gables that I really can't point to any specific similarities beyond the obvious. To be honest I can't remember much about Anne. I'm not sure if I can say I like Rebecca more because I can't remember Anne...but I like this book more. I don't think I see LMM as copying or plagiarizing. I wonder if she just saw it as writing her own Canadian version. I hope I'm making a little sense. 3w
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sblbooks Well, I can't say for sure...I think Wiggin could have a case against LMM for plagiarism. It makes me very sad since she's one of my favorite authors. I never knew about this since I've never read this book before. 3w
sblbooks There are numerous similarities between Rebecca and Anne. In addition, Emily of New Moon reminds me even more of Rebecca. When Adam Lads character was introduced the first thing I thought of was "creepy Dean" from the Emily series. 3w
TheAromaofBooks While there are definitely some similarities, I also do think that they are very different stories. There are many books about children having to go live with other people, and many stories about spunky, talkative girls. However, scenes like the drive to the new home and Rebecca having to stand in front of the class as a punishment definitely line up with similar Anne episodes. I still think Anne is far better written, and Anne herself - and ⬇ 3w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) secondary characters - much better drawn. Anne's story flows better, with a sense of Anne's character development and progression. Is it plagiarism if you take an idea and make it a lot better? 😂 I really am enjoying Rebecca, but the quality of writing is definitely far better in Anne. 3w
Daisey There are definitely some striking similarities. Like @sblbooks I also thought there were some parallels to Emily & Dean. I also agree with @TheAromaofBooks that those similarities are a pretty basic aspect. Additionally, although I enjoy Rebecca, I find Anne to be a much better story and LMM‘s writing much more descriptive. 3w
BarbaraJean @julieclair Yes, there are SO many parallels. I was skeptical about the plagiarism talk, but the similarities kept piling up! Characters, circumstances, scenes…there‘s even a similar antagonist at school, with Minnie Smellie (side note: character names just don‘t get better than that!). I like your distinction between plagiarism & borrowing/copying. To a certain extent, I don‘t think you can really plagiarize fiction—other than if you literally ⬇ (edited) 3w
BarbaraJean (Cont‘d) copy/paste someone else‘s writing. Even if the ideas/plot points are the same, HOW you write it will be different. There‘s that idea that there are only 7 basic plots—similar plots aren‘t plagiarism; it‘s about how you write that particular plot. But with these two books (and also the similarities @sblbooks mentions with LMM‘s Emily books), it seems to go beyond just drawing from similar plots & genres. It makes me uncomfortable, too! ⬇ 3w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) On the other hand, Anne & Rebecca are clearly different characters with different personalities. I need to read the rest of the book before saying this definitively, but it seems that LMM is doing different things with Anne than Wiggin does with Rebecca. I agree with @TheAromaofBooks and @Daisey—at least so far, I think there‘s more going on—more depth, better writing, more character development and progression—in AoGG than in RoSF. 3w
rubyslippersreads I agree with everyone who sees similarities between this book and Anne/Emily. I think what makes the difference is LMM‘s writing. Almost everyone knows about Anne (although some of that is probably due to the TV miniseries), but I don‘t think many people remember Rebecca. Only LMM has scholarly papers and conferences about her work. I think it‘s the quality of her writing that sets her apart. 3w
BarbaraJean @Sace I read somewhere that Anne of Green Gables was marketed as a Canadian Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm! But I‘ve also read that LMM got the idea for Anne from a newspaper story about an orphan girl sent to a couple by mistake, instead of a boy. That makes me think she was just working with a similar idea, at least initially—but that doesn‘t mean she didn‘t also draw from Rebecca. There are far too many similarities for it to be coincidence! 3w
BarbaraJean Here are a couple links that discuss the question of plagiarism & the similarities between these books:
https://teaandinksociety.com/plagiarism-montgomery-shared-universe/
http://canadianicon.org/table-of-contents/mirror-images-anne-of-green-gables-and...
I‘ve kind of skimmed both, because I want to avoid potential spoilers for Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm! But maybe we can revisit these next week.
3w
BarbaraJean @rubyslippersreads Yes, absolutely--I think there's more depth to LMM's writing. There are deeper themes and richer writing in Anne than we find in Rebecca. To be fair, there are more Anne books (as well as the miniseries and other adaptations), but I do think LMM's writing lends itself to deeper study than Rebecca does. Rebecca is charming and delightful, but I keep going back to the emotional depth in Anne. 3w
Sace @TheAromaofBooks This is the first time I am learning that the two books are so alike (sorry, never read them as a child). I've always assumed that they were two very different books. So now that I know how similar they are I can totally see LMM reading RoSB and thinking "Oh I can do this better. " 3w
julieclair Discussions like this are why I love Litsy so much! 2w
BarbaraJean @Sace I read Anne as a child, but this is my first time reading Rebecca. I'd heard the two books were very similar, down to accusations of plagiarism, but am experiencing those similarities for the first time. Now I see what people meant!! And I love the idea of LMM reading Rebecca and saying “hold my beer“—or rather, “hold my raspberry cordial“ 😂 @julieclair Me tooooo!! 2w
lauraisntwilder There are similarities, but the whole vibe is so different. Anne so desperately wants to stay at Green Gables, but Rebecca tries to run away from her aunts before the book is even half over. I like Rebecca, but it feels almost unfair to compare her to Anne, who is one of the most beloved characters of all time. 2w
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BarbaraJean
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“I‘m glad I said just what I did.”
“I dare say you are,” remarked Jane, with what might be described as one of her annual bursts of courage; “but all the same, Mirandy, it wasn‘t good manners,
and it wasn‘t good religion!”

I loved this exchange between Miranda and Jane—which later leads to the first softening we see in Miranda!

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

julieclair I loved this exchange, too. And I‘m hoping that Rebecca‘s presence will give Jane a burst of courage more often than just once a year. 😂 3w
sblbooks Great quote! 3w
rubyslippersreads I just started this (though I know I‘ve read it before). The aunts remind me a bit of Aunt Elizabeth and Aunt Laura in Emily of New Moon. 3w
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BarbaraJean @rubyslippersreads I was thinking that as well. I think the aunts' relationship with each other as well as with Rebecca is very similar to the relationships between Emily/Aunt Elizabeth/Aunt Laura. There are also elements of the Miranda/Jane relationship that remind me of Aunt Chatty and Aunt Kate in Windy Poplars. 3w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @BarbaraJean - I do see some similarities between these two aunts and various aunts in LMM's fiction, but I also think that the grumpy+overbearing/secretly sunshine pairing is not uncommon, especially in stories set during an era when single women didn't just go off and live alone. As a side note, I definitely like Marilla better than Miranda! 3w
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Yes, absolutely—it's not like the grumpy + happy pairing hadn't been done before, especially with the “maiden aunts“ or “maiden sisters“ trope. That's one of the things I'm having a hard time with over supposed “plagiarism“ or borrowing. A lot of this stuff wasn't new when RoSF was published. But there are a LOT of similarities all over the place in AoGG!! And yes—Marilla shows a sense of humor early on. Miranda not so much. 2w
lauraisntwilder @rubyslippersreads @TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean I thought of Emily, Elizabeth, and Laura, too. 2w
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BarbaraJean
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What do you think of Rebecca as a character? Is she believable? Do you find her likable?
Which of the secondary characters are your favorites—either to love or love to hate?
What are your favorite scenes or quotes from the first half of the book?

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

julieclair I adore Rebecca! As a child, I would have loved to have her for a friend. I think my favorite character is Mr. Cobb. The scene where he convinces Rebecca not to run away, and then devises a plan to get her back home unnoticed, was so heartwarming. I just wanted to hug him! 3w
sblbooks @julieclair same here, all my favorites as well. 3w
TheAromaofBooks I was horrified when Rebecca threw her parasol in the well!!! I'm really enjoying this story overall - I'm still surprised that this is the first time I've read it! 3w
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BarbaraJean @julieclair @sblbooks I loved that scene with Mr. Cobb as well. Her relationship with the Cobbs is so sweet--I love the little description of when they take her to Milltown, and when they're so impressed by her poetry! @TheAromaofBooks Me too about the parasol!! It was such a prized possession!! That episode reminded me of the way the kids in Rainbow Valley decide to take on punishments in order to improve themselves. Another LMM parallel! 3w
rubyslippersreads I love the Cobbs. They remind me of Elnora‘s kind neighbors, the Sintons, in 3w
rubyslippersreads @BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks Isn‘t there a similar “sacrifice “ scene in one of Louisa May Alcott‘s books? Maybe 3w
julieclair @rubyslippersreads I had totally forgotten about Limberlost! That‘s another one I never got around to reading. Stacked! 2w
BarbaraJean @rubyslippersreads I've never read Girl of the Limberlost OR Jo's Boys!! They're both on the never ending list... 2w
lauraisntwilder I like Rebecca, but I think reading this book with LMM isn't doing it any favors. I find LMM to be the better writer. Too much of Rebecca's charm is being conveyed in the narration and by other characters talking about her. When Rebecca does talk, she's charming. 2w
lauraisntwilder @julieclair @rubyslippersreads @BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks I haven't read Jo's Boys or Girl of the Limberlost either. More for my list! 2w
TheAromaofBooks @rubyslippersreads @julieclair @BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder - I thought Girl of the Limberlost was okay, but I actually liked her earlier book set the Limberlost better. I just reread my old review of Limberlost (8 years ago!) and it kind of came back to me that I loved the main character, but her mom was rather dreadful haha (edited) 2w
tpixie @julieclair Mr Cobb was the best! That was a great scene 🩵 1w
26 likes14 comments
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BarbaraJean
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“When Joy and Duty clash,
Let Duty go to smash.”

😂 I just love Rebecca‘s personality!!

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent #ChildrensClassicRead2024

TheBookHippie I have to say I had no idea how lovely this book is. I‘m really enjoying it. 3w
rubyslippersreads @TheBookHippie I‘m rereading it, but had forgotten how good it is. 3w
30 likes2 comments
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BarbaraJean
Reading Genesis | Marilynne Robinson
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#5JoysFriday!
1. My husband‘s jazz combo on Sunday
2. My EfM (Education for Ministry) group‘s last meeting of the year—it‘s been such an incredible group this year + we had a delicious potluck dinner!
3. A big library haul brings me joy and stresses me out at the same time 😆
4. A panel from an MG comic my friend is writing—which she shared at our creative writing group this week
5. Book gift (tagged!) from a woman in my EfM group

julieclair Lovely joys! Do you lead your EfM group? I‘ve stacked the Genesis book. 👍 3w
BarbaraJean @julieclair I do! It‘s my second year as a mentor. I‘m excited to read the Genesis book—I‘ve read and enjoyed some of Marilynne Robinson‘s fiction but had no idea she‘d written this one! 3w
julieclair EfM is intriguing to me. A big commitment, but I imagine it is very powerful. 3w
BarbaraJean @julieclair It is both for sure—a big commitment with the reading it requires, but it‘s definitely powerful as well. It has really opened up my view of God and the Bible, and I love the depth of discussions we have and the community that results from all of the above! (edited) 3w
DebinHawaii A wonderful list of joys! 💛💛💛 A good group & a tasty potluck are joy bringers & that comic panel is so cute! Thanks for sharing & spreading the joy! 🤗 3w
33 likes1 stack add5 comments
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BarbaraJean
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More #LibraryProblems! These were not all supposed to come in so quickly… 😆😩

This brings my current checkout total to 11: with 9 fiction and 2 cookbooks. I have my work cut out for me here…

Bookwormjillk You can do it!! 3w
BarbaraJean @Bookwormjillk I hope so! 😆📚💪🏼 3w
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BarbaraJean
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“Rise my soul, strain every nerve,
Thy mortgage to remove,
Gain thy mother‘s heartfelt thanks
Thy family‘s grateful love.”

I‘m definitely seeing the parallels between this and Anne of Green Gables (that opening chapter and Rebecca chatting with the driver!), but Rebecca is far more practical—Anne never wrote poetry about striving to pay off a mortgage. 😂😂

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #ChildrensClassicRead2024

julieclair Yes! Chatty Rebecca and Chatty Anne. 💙 I would love to read a book where the two of them meet and become friends! 3w
BarbaraJean @julieclair I would love to read that fanfic!! They would likely be kindred spirits! 2w
julieclair But neither one of them would be able to get a word in edgewise… 😂 2w
35 likes3 comments
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BarbaraJean
Happy Litsyversary! | Special Events
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🎉📚🎉 I‘ve been wondering when this would pop up! Eight years!! I‘m so thankful for this little corner of the socials. From buddy reads & chapter-a-day readalongs to readathons & Litsy swaps, Litsy and all you wonderful Littens have given me so much joy (not to mention oodles of fantastic book recommendations and a gloriously overfilled TBR). I‘d love to give back with a little giveaway! Comment below & tell me something you love about Litsy⤵️

BarbaraJean (Cont‘d) …or make a post of your own and tag me. I‘ll draw a name on 5/29–in eight days!—and will send the winner a book from their Litsy TBR (or other wish list of your choice). 3w
Amiable It‘s the only place where everyone feels the same sense of joy and wonder inside the pages of a book that I do! 3w
JessClark78 Happy Litsyversary! 🎊📚🎉 3w
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Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks Happy Litsyversary 🎊🎉🎈 I love all of the friendships I have made here ❤️ 3w
TheBookgeekFrau Happy Litsyversary!! 🎊 3w
Librarybelle Happy Litsyversary!! 3w
monalyisha I love how truly wholesome the community feels! Just a bunch of good little doobies not embarrassed to OWN their good little doobiness. 😅 Whenever I periodically impose a social media cleanse upon myself, this is the only app I don‘t delete. It doesn‘t lend itself to doom-scrolling — not even a little. 💞 3w
monalyisha Happy Litsyversary! 🥳 3w
Karisimo Congrats @BarbaraJean !!! I love Litsy because it connects me to my kind of people- readers! I love that if I have a question about whether or not to read a book, I can usually find help here! 3w
mrp27 Happy Litsyversary! 🎉📚🎉📚 3w
CarolynM Happy Litsyversary🎉 3w
Lcsmcat Happy 8th Litsyversary!! 💥 🎉 🎈🎊 3w
Daisey Happy Litsyversary! 🎉 3w
dabbe HL! This place is safe and warm and kind and book-nerdish and intelligent and supportive and ... just the best online place to be. 💙🩵💙 3w
Ruthiella Happy Litsyversary! 🥳🥳🥳 3w
julesG Happy Litsyversary! 3w
julesG Litsy is full of kind people who have enriched my life, and my family's. I've met wonderful Littens in real life, I've added lots of books to #MountTBR and the best: no one judges what I read. We're all book-mad here. 😁 3w
peanutnine Happy Litsyversary! Like everyone else, I love the community here. It's always so supportive, from books & reading advice to major life events to sharing pet pictures 🥰😻 3w
LeahBergen 🎉🎉🎉 3w
AnneCecilie Happy Litsyversary 📚🎉📚🎉 3w
Hooked_on_books Woohoo! Happy Litsyversary to my fellow OG Litten! 3w
51 likes21 comments
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BarbaraJean
Iron Widow | Xiran Jay Zhao
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Starting a new book. Flipped to the back flap to check out the author bio. Found this. 😂 That‘s… a choice.

I‘ve spent too much time pondering this. Is it meant to be ironic? Whimsical? Something else I‘m not getting? Because the facial expression is not giving me ironic or whimsical or anything that would suggest “I am wearing a cow onesie,” but here we are.

MommyWantsToReadHerBook This is the best thing I've seen in a while! 4w
julieclair That looks like something you‘d see hanging in an avant garde photo exhibition! 🤔 4w
SarahBookInterrupted I read what the book is about hoping for hints. There are no cows 🐄 in this book. It really is strange 🤣 4w
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IndoorDame I love it!!! 4w
BookBelle84 They made a bet with a friend if they ever got published they would wear a cow onesie for the author photo. On their Instagram was a vote recently for the costume for the next one! 4w
5feet.of.fury I love them 😂🐮 4w
tpixie @BookBelle84 funny friend fun! 4w
BarbaraJean @BookBelle84 Hahahaha--now this makes all the sense! 3w
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BarbaraJean
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We‘ll start discussing our first #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMAdjacent book next week! On Saturday, May 25, we‘ll chat about Chapters 1-15, and on June 1, we‘ll discuss chapters 16 through the end of the book.

This dovetails with the #ChildrensClassicRead2024 for May, hosted by @TheBookHippie —so if you‘re buddy reading there, feel free to drop in over here and join us to chat the next couple of Saturdays!

julieclair Yay! 4w
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! Can't believe I am finally going to read this one LOL 4w
Daisey I didn‘t think I was going to be able to fit a reread of this one in, but I need a light audiobook between more serious ones and started listening today. 3w
BarbaraJean @Daisey Oh yay! Glad to have you for this one! 3w
33 likes4 comments
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BarbaraJean
Complete Journals of L.M. Montgomery: The PEI Years, 1889-1900 | Mary Henley Rubio, Elizabeth Hillman Waterston
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Happy Saturday, Kindred Spirits! Here's our weekly #LMMJournals #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead check-in!

What are your thoughts on this week's reading?
What stands out to you:
From LMM's year at Prince of Wales College?
From her time teaching in Bideford?
Any observations, favorite sections or quotes?

Reminder: Next week, we'll pause the journals & pick up our first #LMMAdjacent book: Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. We'll discuss Chapters 1-15 on 5/25.

lauraisntwilder When Maud was in Charlottetown, I missed her beautiful descriptions of the countryside near Cavendish. We've gotten to see more of her personality in this section, I think. The trick involving Jack S. and Mary C. was funny and reminded me of how often gossip plays a role in her books, one way or another. 4w
TheAromaofBooks I don't know why I'm surprised at how often LMM's journals sound like her heroines haha Reading these has made me realize that while I frequently get impatient with rhapsodic descriptions of the countryside in fiction, I've always enjoyed it in LMM's books, and I think it's because she isn't writing what she thinks someone who loves the countryside/nature would say - she's literally writing what she, the author, feels, and her genuine love for ⬇ 4w
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) nature and ability to see beauty all around her really comes through. It always feels genuine, and her journals show that it really IS genuine - her description of the snow on Dec. 6,'84 - “Earth looked like a cold, chaste bride in her silver veil, waiting to be waked by her lover's kiss to warmth and love and passion.“ Even though it's a bit flowery, I still loved this whole passage. @lauraisntwilder 4w
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder I agree--we see more of her personality here. Her writing feels less self-conscious. I think she's both growing up and growing up as a writer. No doubt part of it is that she's older and having experiences away from home! And I hadn't thought about the connection to the gossip plot threads in her books, but it's definitely there! That episode, and much of her college year, reminded me of both Anne of the Island and Emily Climbs. 3w
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks I agree with you both about her nature descriptions--she was criticized for her “purple prose“ in her fiction (and so was Anne!), but the descriptions in her journal feel so natural. She's not trying to be flowery, she's reveling in the beauty she sees and wants to capture it on the page. It really reminds me of Emily Starr!! 3w
25 likes5 comments
review
BarbaraJean
Clear: A Novel | Carys Davies
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Pickpick

What an exquisite jewel of a novel! A cloudy, green-and-grey jewel. With such a short book, there was more mood than story—but the depth of loneliness and connection conveyed here was gorgeous. My only complaint was that I wanted more—just a couple more chapters of resolution—and yet I also understand why the author closes the story where she does.

I had this on my holds list and it came in RIGHT before it got picked for #CampLitsy24. ⤵️

BarbaraJean (Cont‘d) I had little confidence I could get the hold timing right if I sent it back, so it was an early read and hopefully I can remember the details for the discussion! @BarbaraBB 1mo
Hooked_on_books I read it before it was even picked, so we‘ll be in the same boat for camp! 1mo
BarbaraBB Encouraging that you loved it so much! Can‘t wait for 8 June! 1mo
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mcctrish Mine just arrived 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 1mo
squirrelbrain Great that you loved it! ❤️ 1mo
lauraisntwilder This is on my list! I'm you liked it! 1mo
rockpools Lovely review! 4w
Megabooks Fantastic review! 3w
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review
BarbaraJean
Saltus | Tara Gereaux
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Pickpick

Heart-wrenching, beautiful, hopeful. This got right into my heart & pulled all the strings. Set in small-town rural Canada in the 1990s, this short novel delves deeply into a set of characters linked by their connections to a teen denied gender-affirming care. It‘s a quiet story exploring discomfort and transition & sometimes surprising connections—some fleeting, but all transformative. I loved this. It will likely end up on my best-of this year!

BarbaraJean Thank you @monalyisha for the #AuldLangSpine rec! 1mo
monalyisha Wasn‘t it incredible? I can‘t believe it didn‘t garner more attention! 1mo
BarbaraJean @monalyisha Seriously amazing. Not sure HOW it flew so far under the radar. I was glad that my library had it, although it was only available via hoopla. 1mo
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JamieArc Oh yay. This was on my #AuldLangSpine list for @monalyisha So glad the love for it is getting passed along ❤️ 1mo
monalyisha @JamieArc is a book-finding godsend! 😇 1mo
BarbaraJean @JamieArc @monalyisha I love the way Auld Lang Spine lists keep paying it forward! 1mo
45 likes6 comments
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BarbaraJean
Complete Journals of L.M. Montgomery: The PEI Years, 1889-1900 | Mary Henley Rubio, Elizabeth Hillman Waterston
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Happy Weekend, Kindred Spirits! This week we read through June 30, 1893, including the later part of LMM‘s stay with her father, her journey back to Cavendish, and her studies and social doings back at home.

What are your thoughts so far?
Was there anything that surprised you in this section?
What glimpses do you see of LMM‘s future writing?
Any observations, favorite sections or quotes?

#LMMJournals #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead

BarbaraJean I was surprised there wasn't more about her stepmother. From the bios, her time in Prince Albert seemed much harder than she portrays it. Same with her journey home; in the bios it sounded like she was left to fend for herself much of that journey, traveling alone for a while, which was scandalous/unsafe for a young girl at that time. Here, it sounded like she was accompanied the whole way, other than one overnight train. ⬇ 1mo
BarbaraJean It makes me wonder how much she left out at the time vs. how much she cut out later. It's been said that she “razored out“ pages—I wish there were notes in the text showing where those missing pages fall! @lauraisntwilder You noted how much this reads like one of her books—that rang true for so many scenes this week! The Mr. Mustard proposal & the cow escapades could have come right out of Anne. And she uses the Well & Dave memories in Story Girl. 1mo
lauraisntwilder I have been surprised by so many things. I agree that the step-mother seemed glossed over, but then, she barely mentions her harsh Grandfather Macneill and rarely mentions her grandmother at all. She hasn't mentioned Christmas at home, only concerts and school performances, then straight to New Year's. That feels telling to me--were all her friends occupied and she was alone with her grouchy grandparents? Surely they would go to Park Corner? 1mo
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lauraisntwilder Love the details about Austin, at school, which was very Gilbert/Anne. And the description of her Uncle John, who will later try to steal her house out from under her and his own mother, who "was not then, anymore than now, noted for his consideration of other people's rights or feelings." Scathing and prescient! 1mo
TheAromaofBooks @lauraisntwilder @BarbaraJean - I may have missed it, but has she ever mentioned her own birthday at any point? That seems like the kind of thing she would make a fuss about, as someone who likes to assess where she is and where she's going. She definitely seems focused on the positives. In fairness, a lot of things/chores we would consider “drudgery“ were just a part of every day life there, and not worth describing, I suppose. I don't ⬇ 1mo
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) journal much about my daily chores either haha Like Barbara, I wonder where the missing entries are, and whether they had some harder/more complaining content. She glosses over her stepmother, but reading between the lines you can tell she has a hard time of it - just the simple fact that she had to give up school to stay home and do work speaks volumes for the kind of life she was living there, considering how important education is ⬇ 1mo
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) to her. I've really enjoyed all these random memories and stories - I don't know why I'm surprised to see what a storytelling knack she has, but I have been pleasantly surprised at how entertaining these have been. One gripe I actually have has been with the excessive amount of footnotes (not LMM's) - some explaining archaic words would be fine, but seriously a footnote to explain why they were hunting 4-leaf clovers just felt ⬇ 1mo
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) condescending 😂 And I feel like a glossary of characters would have been way more helpful than constant footnotes. Telling me how this person is related this one time doesn't actually help me remember them 15 pages later. But those are minor quibbles with the layout. I'm enjoying the journals themselves a great deal. 1mo
lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks You know, you're right, I don't think she has mentioned her birthday. If she has, definitely not every year. And yes, to your footnote gripe! ? I didn't need a note for every resident of Prince Albert, especially when I already know she's never going back! I did think the (unnecessary) footnote about the northern lights was pretty though, specifically the phrase "a curtain of light." 1mo
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks I just checked, and no, there aren't descriptions of Christmas or birthdays, at least through 1893. I agree, Sarah: she seems like the kind of person who likes to look back & kind of take stock (she does that several times in a New Year‘s entry), so it‘s curious that those events aren‘t narrated or reflected upon in her journals. It does make sense that she wouldn‘t detail daily chores, etc. ⬇ 1mo
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) the balance feels VERY tilted towards “gadding about” and social events, but naturally so. I think I just assumed there would be more grumbling about grumpy grandparents & awful stepmother! There was one point where she said that her grandparents seemed opposed to any kind of gathering of young people, which cracked me up—based on the events she recorded it seemed kind of like that‘s ALL she was doing: gathering with other young people.😂 1mo
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks YES about the footnotes!! Some are a delight. But I am so tired of footnotes with irrelevant details about people who just aren't important to LMM. I don't care how they're related to her, where they used to live, where they move later—if they're never/rarely mentioned again! I started ignoring the people footnotes for that reason, but then found it annoying to have to go back to find an earlier footnote when ⬇ 1mo
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) ...it became apparent that someone I overlooked turned out to be important. It would be so much more helpful for footnotes to fill in context about how/why the person is or becomes significant in her life. And leave out the footnote otherwise! I should have started making a character list like I do when reading Russian novels...😆 1mo
TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder - I was actually thinking the same thing about a character list! 😂 For this book, a character glossary seems like it would be much more helpful than all these dadblamed footnotes LOL

I guess part of the reason I've been a little surprised about the lack of complaining has been because the biographies we've read have spoken with such confidence about how miserable she was living with her grandpa, how he was a ⬇
1mo
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) terrible person, how he constantly held her back, etc. etc. If that information didn't come from her journals, then where did the biographers get it? At this point he just seems like a shadowy background character. Even when she was leaving for Charlottesville I don't remember her saying anything like “Grandpa doesn't want me to go,“ although she does mention that her Grandma was the one who drove her. Grandpa even has come to visit at ⬇ 1mo
TheAromaofBooks (cont'd) least once? I'm not trying to say that he wasn't actually against her furthering her education, etc., but I definitely don't feel like it's been mentioned at all so far. 1mo
lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean I have to assume she talked about her grandparents in her letters. Rubio interviewed a lot of people for the bio, so maybe they told her the grandparents were hard to live with? It feels like she's writing down what she wants to remember and she wouldn't need to be reminded that Grandpa is a jerk. 1mo
lauraisntwilder @TheAromaofBooks @BarbaraJean The absence of any good memories with her grandparents says a lot, too. Like Christmas and birthdays. If they were pleasant or she took a nice evening walk with her grandmother or something, I feel like it would've been mentioned. 1mo
TheAromaofBooks @lauraisntwilder - It's true, all of her “good times“ are taking place NOT at home! 1mo
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks @lauraisntwilder Yes, I've wondered the same about where Rubio & others got the info that her grandparents were so difficult & her grandfather was against her education. The only inkling I've seen is in this week's reading, when she says he won't take her to interview for schools or let her have a horse to go herself. I think Laura must be right that it's in her letters or from Rubio's interviews. It could be in later journals ⬇ 4w
BarbaraJean (Cont'd) ...if she refers back to her growing-up years then. Didn't one of the bios suggest she exaggerated how bad things were? That exaggeration has to be somewhere! It would make sense if there are future journal entries where she reminisces/complains about the past. Regardless, you're both right that what's left out is very telling, when her best moments are NOT at home! And especially because home and family are such a focus in her books. 4w
27 likes21 comments
quote
BarbaraJean
Complete Journals of L.M. Montgomery: The PEI Years, 1889-1900 | Mary Henley Rubio, Elizabeth Hillman Waterston
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“How I do love books! Not merely to read once but over and over again. I enjoy the tenth reading of a book as much as the first. Books are a delightful world in themselves. Their characters seem as real to me as my friends of actual life.”
—L.M. Montgomery, January 12, 1893

#LMMJournals #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead

TheAromaofBooks ❤ ❤ ❤ 1mo
MaGoose Yes, I agree. I don't know if I'd read a book 10 times, but I'll read some at least two or three times. The Scarlet Letter, for example: I first read it in school as required reading and liked it well enough. But I read it again in my late 40s or early 50s and thoroughly enjoyed it. I got much more out of the story. Some books are meant to be enjoyed and absorbed at certain times during our lives, I guess. #litsylove 3w
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BarbaraJean
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“I am a guest here, charged with serving other guests—even those who present themselves as my enemies. I am allowed to resist them, but as long as I trust in one God who made us all, I cannot act as if they are no kin to me. There is only one House. Human beings must either learn to live in it together or we will not survive to hear its sigh of relief when our numbered days are done.”

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BarbaraJean
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#5JoysFriday
🙏🏼 I was on the waitlist for a spiritual direction course, and a spot opened up
🍎 Plans for an NYC trip with one of my best friends
🎹 My husband‘s piano service—much needed peace after a rough day
🍣 Sharing sushi after helping good friends pack for their upcoming move—bittersweet!
🎶 New album from Over the Rhine in my inbox today—a delightful surprise, since I preordered ages ago!
📚 Bonus: Library book haul!

TheBookHippie I love everything -especially the piano part!!! 1mo
BarbaraJean @TheBookHippie 💜 💜 Me too!! And if you want to listen to the piano part, there's this: https://fb.watch/r_H40E0Z6a/ 😁 1mo
DebinHawaii A very joyful list! 💛💛💛 Music & books are such joy bringers! Thanks for joining in & sharing the joy! 🤗 1mo
38 likes3 comments
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BarbaraJean
Tender Spot: Selected Poems | Naomi Shihab Nye
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“Little Sister Ibtisam,
our sleep flounders, our sleep tugs
the cord of your name.
Dead at 13, for staring through
the window into a gun barrel
which did not know you wanted to be
a doctor.

How do we carry the endless surprise
of all our deaths? Becoming doctors
for one another, Arab, Jew,
instead of guarding tumors of pain
as if they hold us upright?”

💔

quote
BarbaraJean
Complete Journals of L.M. Montgomery: The PEI Years, 1889-1900 | Mary Henley Rubio, Elizabeth Hillman Waterston
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“Dear old world you are very lovely and I love you. I am glad to be alive in you.”

I LOVE that what becomes a future Anne quote is taken almost directly from 17-year-old LMM‘s journal!

#LMMJournals #KindredSpiritsBuddyRead

TheAromaofBooks ❤ ❤ ❤ 1mo
lauraisntwilder This diary reads like one of her books so far. 1mo
BarbaraJean @lauraisntwilder The cow escapades earlier this week felt so much like an Anne and Diana adventure! 1mo
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BarbaraJean
Felicity: Poems | Mary Oliver
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Things take the time they take. Don't worry.
How many roads did St. Augustine follow
before he became St. Augustine?

JamieArc I have this memorized and repeat it to myself when needed ❤️ 1mo
BarbaraJean @JamieArc 💜 I definitely needed it this week! 1mo
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BarbaraJean
Complete Journals of L.M. Montgomery: The PEI Years, 1889-1900 | Mary Henley Rubio, Elizabeth Hillman Waterston
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“I had a charming time all through except for a scare I got with one of David Macneill‘s cows, and having to skulk about the woods for nearly an hour while the Baptists were going through the lane to Sunday School…”

The image of LMM “skulking about the woods” to avoid the Baptists just cracked me up. And the cow! I really want more detail in this entry!!

#KindredSpiritsBuddyRead #LMMJournals

BarbaraJean Clearly I posted too soon, as there is more detail about avoiding savage-looking cows in the October 22 entry. 😆 1mo
TheAromaofBooks I'm so surprised that a country girl like Maud has such a terror of cows! I marked the passage I was reading today because I was a bit horrified at her casual attitude towards fence breaking as well! 😂 1mo
BarbaraJean @TheAromaofBooks I know, right?! But it was both LMM and Lu! That comment: “I don‘t know how it is that we have got to be such cowards over strange cows.” 😂Partially in their defense as regards the fence-breaking: at least some of it was done because of their “deadly fear” of cows.🤣 Although THAT made me worry that the cows would get out!! 1mo
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BarbaraJean
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“I believe in the healing ministry
of phlox, the holy brokenness of saints,
the fortuity of faults—of making
and then redeeming mistakes.”

—from “Creed” by Abigail Carroll

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BarbaraJean
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“A poem is an ark, a suitcase in which to pack
the universe…”

—from “Creed,” by Abigail Carroll