Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
bibliothecarivs

bibliothecarivs

Joined August 2020

LibraryThing member bibliothecarivs

TinyCat library

Iosephvs Bibliothecarivs ⚝ husband+father happily hedged by books, music, film, trees ⚝ mediævalist, humanist, ecosocialist ⚝ ever dreaming of England
review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

2022 review for Banned Books Week at my library:

A beautifully-composed story of a woman in rural England striving against the unyielding social conventions of her time. As a character, Tess's relentless effort to simply live and love despite very difficult circumstances continues to inspire me.

Tess was censored during the process of publication and banned in several places on both sides of the Atlantic in the years following.

Bookwomble I bought a nice Folio edition of this which I really should read. It was one of my sister's favourite books, and she named my niece Tessa after Hardy's heroine ❤️ 3d
bibliothecarivs @Bookwomble that's wonderful. Thanks for sharing. 3d
7 likes1 stack add2 comments
quote
bibliothecarivs

'Modern England is so strewn with the debris of the past that we may be forgiven for ignoring it. Walk along the Thames path at Rotherhithe and you pass the outline of an Edwardian manor house - a stone building that once overlooked the river. It belonged to Edward III [1312-1377], not Edward VII [1841-1910]. Yet it does not feel out of place between the wings of a modern housing estate.'

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Mehso-so

★★★☆☆ My third or fourth reading of this book, I believe. Unfortunately, it was just middle-of-the road for me this time, probably due to the fact that my attitudes to religion, monarchy, and fiction have changed so much over the last decade. Not a bad story, but I don't see it as great anymore either.

Bookwomble I pretty much tune out the Christianity and monarchy, take in the universal symbolism, and enjoy the talking animals 😊 2w
bibliothecarivs That sounds like a great plan. Next time. 2w
11 likes2 comments
review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

★★★★★ Imagine what readers, teachers, librarians, and publishers thought when this, a children's picture book about the building of a fictional medieval French cathedral illustrated in black and white pen-and-ink, was released in 1973. The text is accompanied by large-scale drawings of stunning birds-eye views interspersed with instructional sketches of life on the ground. It must have blown everyone's minds. It was named a Caldecott Honor book.⬇️

bibliothecarivs Despite loving David Macaulay's PBS programs Cathedral and Castle since childhood, I had never read this book until now. The programs followed me through my education from elementary school to community college and I later bought them on DVD so I could continue watching them at home and share them with my children. His drawing style influenced my own, which I believe later influenced my daughter's. ⬇️ 4w
bibliothecarivs I had the opportunity to meet Macaulay after a lecture at Utah State University in October, 2014 and he was as smart, kind, and creative as I always thought he was. He not only signed our copy of Cathedral, but he also left an original drawing on the title page. I'll treasure it forever. 4w
Bookwomble Fabulous! What a great person. It must have been so touching to hear and meet him 💖📖 4w
3 likes3 comments
blurb
bibliothecarivs
post image

September is 🎗️Childhood Cancer Awareness Month🎗️

43 kids are diagnosed every day

Someone I 💛 was diagnosed 4/3/20 - the day that is used to bring awareness of the 43

Please donate to research through http://TheContinentalKCCChallenge.com and Continental Tire will match it!

#kickchildhoodcancer⚽️🎗️

quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

'We hear this quite often, that only time can solve this problem.... Well the people who argue this do not themselves realize that time is neutral, that it can be used constructively or deconstructively. At points the people of ill will, the segregationists, have used time much more effectively than the people of good will. ⬇️

bibliothecarivs 'So individuals in the struggle must come to realize that it is necessary to aid time, that without this kind of aid, time itself will become an ally of the insurgent and primitive forces of social stagnation.' 1mo
2 likes1 comment
quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

'[Chaucer] was not a poet who happened to be a diplomat and government official; he was a government official and diplomat who, in his spare time, happened to write poetry.'

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

★★★★☆

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Mehso-so

★★★☆☆

quote
bibliothecarivs

'Where [John Paul II] surprised everybody was in his berserk canonizations of everyone in sight: quite apart from the 1,340 men and women whom he beatified, the first step to sainthood, he canonized no fewer than 483 new saints, more than had been made in the previous five centuries.'

review
bibliothecarivs
A Tree Is Nice | Marc Simont, Janice May Udry
post image
Mehso-so

★★★☆☆

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

★★★★☆

review
bibliothecarivs
The Ethics of Abortion | Jennifer A. Hurley
post image
Mehso-so

★★★☆☆

Pro: I liked the format: a short anthology of writings by various authors examining the issue from different perspectives.

Cons: It was fairly binary and could have benefited from more examples of the messiness of morality. It was published in 2001 and often refers to events of its time so it's somewhat outdated now.

quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

'No one could build an abbey overnight. [The Cistercians] who laid the foundations needed a loving belief in a brighter future and a patient sense of self-sacrifice, since they knew they would never see the end product of their labours. Their keen sense of the endless, fluctuating passage of time gave them immortal longings, and made them unusually industrious.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

'The Challenge Episode appears to us as a series of humiliations and discomfitures for the court which we feel as more comic than tragic. Despite the fact that the challenge is successfully met, the Green Knight departs from the scene as the victor in a kind of psychological warfare.'

quote
bibliothecarivs

'Nature moves in mysterious ways, not all of them natural.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

'The cultural impact of [Bede's] work is hard to overstate. For instance, it is chiefly thanks to him that England is so called, as a different monk might have seen things from a Jutish or Saxon perspective, rather than the Anglian angle. And it was Bede's use of 'anno domini' to describe the years after the birth of Christ that established this as the accepted notation. ⬇

bibliothecarivs 'But there are some keen ironies here. We think of Bede as one of the first great English authors, yet he wrote in Latin. He is notably fussy about facts, yet believed fervently in miracles. And though we think of him as a literary pioneer, he was preoccupied with the past and took history as his theme.' 4mo
2 likes1 comment
review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

★★★★☆

review
bibliothecarivs
The Seventh Seal | Melvyn Bragg
post image
Pickpick

★★★★★

quote
bibliothecarivs
The Seventh Seal | Melvyn Bragg

'By some curious alchemy, [The Seventh Seal] seemed not only to speak to my condition with a precision that was almost hallucinatory, it said what I would have said could I have articulated and organised it by myself.' 1/2

bibliothecarivs 2/2 'This is well known to everyone, everyone who allows himself/herself to be open to and so touched by a work.... There is the whispered, rather worrying but unmistakable feeling that this is specifically for you and about you - even if it by no means fits into your life with all neatness. In a vague but nonetheless palpable sense, the thing sings your song.' 4mo
Bookwomble It's a marvellous film. Have you heard the Scott Walker song which condenses it into a sublime 5 minutes? 4mo
bibliothecarivs @Bookwomble I havent- I'll look it up. Thanks for the tip! I recently learned about the Sparks album about Bergman but haven't listened to that yet either. 4mo
bibliothecarivs @Bookwomble By chance, have you read any of Bragg's books? Though I read this because I'm on a Bergman streak right now, I was also excited to finally read Bragg. Over the years I've seen a few episodes of the South Bank Show as DVD special features or on YouTube here in the US. The first I saw was about one of my favorite films- Neil Jordan's Michael Collins. I'm enchanted by Bragg's curious mind, his presentation style, and that amazing smile. 4mo
Bookwomble I haven't heard of that Sparks album, but I'll see if I can find it in You Tube ? I haven't read any Bragg, though I've got the tagged book, which has been in my tbr shelf for over a decade. I did love the South Bank Show, which stimulated my interest in the arts as a child. He's still broadcasting, and his radio show / podcast "In Our Time" is fantastic: I listen to a couple of episodes every week. 4mo
1 like5 comments
quote
bibliothecarivs
The Seventh Seal | Melvyn Bragg

'Generally the screen was for entertainment: for the real stuff of thought you opened a book. Bergman upended all that in the one film.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
The Seventh Seal | Melvyn Bragg

'Bergman has a deep seriousness about intense emotional relationships which I find sympathetic and with which I find it easy to identify.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
The Seventh Seal | Melvyn Bragg

'We must take him at his word and see The Seventh Seal from the outset as Bergman's attempt to keep... the link between creation and worship and the link between the mid-twentieth century, the Middle Ages, the New Testament and much deeper into the past.'

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

4 likes2 stack adds
quote
bibliothecarivs

'The grounds we offer for our behavior poorly reflect actual motives. In Pascal's elegant phrasing, "The heart has its reasons, of which reason knows nothing."'

review
bibliothecarivs
Educated: A Memoir | Tara Westover
post image
Pickpick

quote
bibliothecarivs
Educated: A Memoir | Tara Westover
post image

'The curry arrived and I focused my attention on it. Mother had grown tired of the lecture, and asked Dad to talk about something else. "But the world is about to end!" he said. He was shouting now. "Of course it is," Mother said. "But let's not discuss it over dinner."'

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

Like his films, Bergman's memoir dokuments the varieties of human life in an artistically honest way, even the elements we typically avoid or don't acknowledge.

Having closed the book a few minutes ago, my overwhelming feeling is of a warm kinship with young Ingmar. In a different time and place, I think I would have been the best of friends with him. ⬇

bibliothecarivs I sometimes find myself grieving that I only discovered Bergman soon after he died- that I couldn't love him while he was alive. It's a feeling I commonly have for historical figures that I'm interested in but in this case the proximity of his life to mine makes it particularly acute. Knowing the outline of my grandfather's life helps me place Bergman's life in recent history. 5mo
bibliothecarivs He was born in 1918, as was my grandfather. After a long career, in 1980 Bergman announced the production of Fanny and Alexander, which would become his last film and one of his most beloved, a couple months after I was born. He died in 2007 and I discovered his work when I viewed The Seventh Seal for the first time in 2009, just before my grandfather died. 5mo
bibliothecarivs At least Bergman's legacy lives on through his films, books (including those written by his lovers, family, admirers, and critics), interviews, and the foundation (ingmarbergman.se/en). 5mo
2 likes3 comments
quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

I didn't know my favourite director and favourite actor crossed paths!

'Practically every morning, I met Lord Olivier at breakfast. For me, it was instructive. [He] held seminars over our cups of coffee and lectured me on the subject of Shakespeare. My enthusiasm knew no bounds. ⬇

bibliothecarivs 'I asked questions, he answered, taking his time, occasionally 'phoning to say he could not attend some morning meeting, then sitting down and having yet another cup of coffee. That singularly modulated voice spoke from a lifetime with Shakespeare, about discoveries, adversities, insights and experiences.' 5mo
1 like1 comment
quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

'Life has precisely the value one puts on it.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

'So now the village genius from Sweden was sitting at the Comédie Française watching The Misanthrope in a youthful, beautiful and emotional performance. The experience was indescribable. The dry alexandrines blossomed and thrived.... Molière stepped into my heart to remain there for the rest of my life. The spiritual circulation of my blood, previously linked to Strindberg, now opened an artery to Molière.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

Instantly reminded me of Michael Haneke's film Das weiße Band (The White Ribbon), which to me has always seemed Bergmanesque.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_White_Ribbon

quote
bibliothecarivs
post image

'Most of our upbringing was based on such concepts as sin, confession, punishment, forgiveness and grace, concrete factors in relationships between children and parents and God. There was an innate logic in all this which we accepted and thought we understood.... So punishments were something self-evident, never questioned. They could be swift and simple... but they could could also be extremely sophisticated, refined through generations.'

review
bibliothecarivs
Unquiet | Linn Ullmann
post image
Pickpick

I was surprised by how much Ullmann's portrayal of her father's last months affected me. In the patterns of his reasoning and speech I was reminded of my grandfather at the same period in his life. My grandfather was born the same year as Ullmann's father and died almost exactly two years after him but because my grandfather rarely spoke to me and Ullmann's father was a public figure, unfortunately I know more about the latter than the former.

3 likes1 stack add
quote
bibliothecarivs
Unquiet | Linn Ullmann
post image

'I will exercise caution in describing her. She will want to do that herself. Every once in a while she baffles me with a look so infinitely her, an *other* altogether, right in the midst of her childhood, relentless in its grip, and even though she will soon abandon it, or it will abandon her, it will follow her for the rest of her life.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
Unquiet | Linn Ullmann
post image

'She doesn't dare say that the garden is the reason she rented this house in the first place, doesn't dare say that it took her forever to find precisely this house and this garden, that everything was supposed to be perfect this time, doesn't dare say that while still in Oslo, she had sent for real estate brochures, twenty, maybe more, with photographs of houses and gardens and trees and rooms, ⬇

bibliothecarivs 'yes, she had poured over them in bed, looked at the different properties, and when she came to the photograph of the big yellow house surrounded by all that greenery she had said to herself: This is where we're going to live. She had a daughter, a child, trees would be climbed.' 6mo
2 likes1 comment
quote
bibliothecarivs
Unquiet | Linn Ullmann
post image

'It's fantastic, you know, that over the years I've built up such a collection... all these books... music... all these records on my shelves.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
Unquiet | Linn Ullmann
post image

'...her father is rarely angry with her. But he can get very angry, He has a bloody temper, the mother says, he can fly into a rage and shout, but the girl knows where the anger is and dodges it. She is skinny. Skinny like a filmstrip, the father says.'

review
bibliothecarivs
Changing | Liv Ullmann
post image
Pickpick

I opened this book because I wanted to learn about Liv and Ingmar but I encountered so much more: a lively and honest voice sharing accomplishments and doubts, a strong woman who cut her own path through the forest of life, including the tangle of single motherhood and Hollywood. I'm looking forward to reading her follow-up memoir, Choices.

The Knopf edition I read was beautifully designed by Camilla Filancia.

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

quote
bibliothecarivs
Changing | Liv Ullmann

'I wanted to open my arms and embrace it all, but because my fear that it would never be mine was so great, it never became mine.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
Changing | Liv Ullmann

'I sit by the window and look down at the beach below. Smile and think of another evening spent with one I loved under a spruce tree because we had nowhere else to go. Our clothes were covered with moss and grass and we laughed and were happy and alone in the world.'

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

Excellent popular history on a fascinating topic.

quote
bibliothecarivs

'That the poem still has meaning for the reader today is because, though the vocabulary has changed, the conflict between ideal codes and human limitations still persists.' ... 'English literature may offer a few, very few better narratives than Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, but none more delightful and humane.'

quote
bibliothecarivs
Changing | Liv Ullmann

'A year in Oslo, where the first few months of loneliness are what I remember best. Where not being able enough, talented enough, was the big sorrow.... An apartment twelve feet square. Days without structure. Long nights filled with bad dreams.... I had the library as a fixed point every day. Hours spent with accurate notes on what I read. Large, silent rooms. A place to be, a place to belong.'

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Mehso-so

I love Tom Gauld's work for its style and wit. The style is here in spades but the wit is mostly missing, having been replaced by sentiment. If you're familiar with his previous work, you're going to notice a change.

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

review
bibliothecarivs
Matrix | Lauren Groff
post image
Pickpick

A loving portrait of a woman on fire.
solum mihi scriptum erat - it was written only for me

review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Mehso-so

I had several issues with this book.

The poetic rhyming was forced at a few points. The illustrations for this story, supposedly set in early medieval Ireland (with monks shown creating manuscripts similar to the Book of Kells), depict modern shoes and Roman style tonsures when the Irish during this period had their own distinct tonsure. ⬇️

bibliothecarivs But the biggest problem I had with the book was the central story idea that no one had thought of using colour to illustrate the monks's writings and drawings until the protagonist accidentally stained his fingers with blackberries. Everything, we are told several times, was brown and boring until Theophane had his juicy revelation and instantly the monastery fully embraced colour in art (and interior design). ⬇️ 8mo
bibliothecarivs That apparently happened because he was the only monk who noticed and appreciated how colourful the natural world outside their windows was. Maybe I'm wrong, but I just don't buy that premise socially or historically. Humans have used color in their art since cave paintings. ⬇️ 8mo
bibliothecarivs So was there ever a moment in time when the monks producing these beautiful manuscripts shifted from not using colour to suddenly doing so? I doubt it, but I'm open to learning if I'm wrong. 8mo
3 likes3 comments
review
bibliothecarivs
post image
Pickpick

I'm still pondering this. I'm not sure I agree with everything here but I'm glad Kingsnorth is asking these questions.