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The Hidden Life of Trees
The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate--Discoveries from a Secret World | Peter Wohlleben
In The Hidden Life of Trees, Peter Wohlleben shares his deep love of woods and forests and explains the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in the woodland and the amazing scientific processes behind the wonders of which we are blissfully unaware. Much like human families, tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, and support them as they grow, sharing nutrients with those who are sick or struggling and creating an ecosystem that mitigates the impact of extremes of heat and cold for the whole group. As a result of such interactions, trees in a family or community are protected and can live to be very old. In contrast, solitary trees, like street kids, have a tough time of it and in most cases die much earlier than those in a group. Drawing on groundbreaking new discoveries, Wohlleben presents the science behind the secret and previously unknown life of trees and their communication abilities; he describes how these discoveries have informed his own practices in the forest around him. As he says, a happy forest is a healthy forest, and he believes that eco-friendly practices not only are economically sustainable but also benefit the health of our planet and the mental and physical health of all who live on Earth.
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BookieBiker
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This book started with a fascinating bang. And while the detail is incredible, I find the read tedious. I have to focus on staying attentive. Yet somehow I don‘t want to give up on the book due to its unique information. 50% read thus far. Ugh.

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monalyisha
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Update: I am still listening to this book. I may always be listening to this book. It will never end. I should have abandoned it but now I‘m too far gone to give in.

Today, the very stodgy British narrator said, “There‘s sucking & excreting going on everywhere“ (re: ants slurping sugar straight out of aphids‘ assholes). I guess that was a moment. 🤷‍♀️🙈

Pictured: me, circa 1993, in the wild woods of New Hampshire.

Texreader Love it! 2w
Kimberlone Wow that quote 🤣🤢 2w
Kimberlone Also your 90s outfit is hella on point 2w
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LibrarianRyan I needed that funny right before bed. 2w
Nebklvr 😂😂. At least you have a rockin‘ 90‘s pic! 2w
BookieBiker It‘s taking me forever to read too. I was really into it until I really wasn‘t. It‘s informative and new thinking but somehow it‘s dulllll to read. Go 90s! 1w
75 likes1 stack add6 comments
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monalyisha
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Trees are basically my religion (see: pretty much all of my posts about “Dandelion Wine”). That being said... I‘m seriously thinking about bailing on this book. It has great reviews but it‘s just not doing it for me. It‘s like a lulling nature documentary only without all of the gorgeous visuals.

Anyone else? Bueller?

ravenlee I got this in German for my SIL, because she‘s a nature lover and student of German language/culture. It sounded mildly interesting for me, at best. 2w
SW-T It‘s pretty consistent all the way through. If it‘s not working for you now, things probably aren‘t going to change. 2w
Hooked_on_books I gave it a pick, but I remember it being a bit of a struggle to get through. I think going in I was hoping for something wonderful like Lab Girl, and it‘s quite different. 2w
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reading_rainbow
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🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲

✨ i always knew trees felt

🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲

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Soozee
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This is an interesting read. And though the author‘s anthropomorphism was quite annoying, I do now find myself looking at trees in parks, road verges, fields etc and wondering if they are communicating, if they will have a shorter life for lack of a support network, if they were part of a larger wood/forest before space was cleared for housing.
Worth a read if you can cope with the idea that trees may have some sort of ‘brain‘. 😲🌲🌳
#treenetwork

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KimM
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Pickpick

“It appears that nutrient exchange and helping neighbors in times of need is the rule, and this leads to the conclusion that forests are superorganisms with interconnections much like ant colonies.”
― Peter Wohlleben, The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World

2019 Reading Challenge: Science

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StephBengtson
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I‘ve been MIA lately because school and work is leaving me no time or energy. I did however make some time to go to my favorite local indie to support #RAICESTX! Also made it in time to hit up the farmers market in the lot next door. Pretty perfect day! #moonpalacebooks #bookstoresagainstborders

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Sunraven
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Extended quote: “Thanks to the migration of trees, the forest is constantly changing. And not just the forest — all of Nature. And that‘s why many human attempts to conserve particular landscapes fail. What we see is always a brief snapshot of a landscape that only seems to be standing still. The illusion is almost perfect in the forest.”

@jchawkins: Apparently I still have trees on the brain. 😉

#nature #trees #treeproject

jchawkins Tag, I'm it! 😁 I'll find one tomorrow for you lol! 2mo
Sunraven @jchawkins: 😆🌳🍃 2mo
8 likes2 comments
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Sunraven
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A tree can be only as strong as the forest that surrounds it.

Photo taken by me at a local park. 😁

#nature #trees

sudi 💜. Welcome to litsy 😊🙋 3mo
Sunraven @sudi Thank you kindly! 😁 3mo
elyseh Welcome to Litsy!!!💚💚💚 2mo
Sunraven @elyseh: Thank you! 💖 2mo
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valeriegeary
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Earth Day vibes! I hugged a tree today (and everyday) did you? 🌲🌳🌴🍁🐿️🐨

Graciouswarriorprincess I loved Last Child in the Woods. 5mo
72 likes1 comment
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Palindrome
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Pickpick

Leafing (!) through this slim volume happily affirms that trees are apolitical, expressing no party affiliations and eschewing partisan dust-ups on Twitter. They are, however, civic-spirited: capable of networking, nurturing, warning others against danger, sharing nutrients with under-the-weather neighbors. This dispatch from a German forester offers a blend of scholarship and whimsy, a gentle reminder of the interconnectedness of living things.

Crazeedi Welcome to litsy!!🎉🎉 6mo
6 likes1 comment
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LinaLovesLit
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I spend most of my time in the forest, so why not learn a little more about trees? 🌳

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Becker
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Pickpick

Everything you could possibly want to know about trees. 🌲Much of it was fascinating.

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Chelsey
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Current read. It's delightfully whimsical and extremely educational. Thanks to the kindle daily deal for cheap access to this one ☝️ 👍

19 likes1 stack add
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Tove_Reads
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Been meaning to read this book for awhile now!

Tamra It‘s packed full of interesting info! 8mo
arubabookwoman After reading The Overstory last year, I‘m very interested in this. 8mo
Emilymdxn I loved this book so much! I read it after the Overstory and loved it 8mo
42 likes3 comments
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Lukey

But why are trees such social beings? Why do they share food with their own species and sometimes even go so far as to nourish their competitors? The reasons
A tree is not a forest. On its own, a tree cannot establish a consistent local climate. It is at the mercy of wind and weather. But together, many trees create an ecosystem that moderates extremes of heat and cold, stores a great deal of water, and generates a great deal of humidity

KrystleTheBookSlayer Welcome to Litsy! ☺📚 8mo
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BestDogDad
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Pickpick

This was really good! It is packed full of interesting botany. The information in this book compliments and crosses over with that found in two other great books I‘ve read over the last couple of years: Lab Girl by Hope Jahren and The Triumph of Seeds by Thor Hanson.

You‘ll come away from this book with a new level of respect for trees. They are more similar to perceptively more advanced members of the animal kingdom than previously thought.

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BestDogDad
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Wonderful. We are part of nature and need its resources to survive but we can go about our consumption more humanely and less wastefully.

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BestDogDad
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Interesting book, but I think there is a bit of over-anthropomorphizing going on. Not sure if you can call it “pain”.

saresmoore He does a lot of that. I just imagined it as a characteristic of his particular religion and was able to enjoy it more. 🙂 8mo
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BestDogDad
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Interesting. Some of the claims in this book seem like a stretch. I would like to get more information based on this claim.

Tamra The more I learn about plants, soil, and microbes, the more fascinating they become! There are worlds I don‘t perceive. 8mo
BestDogDad @Tamra Yes! I really enjoy the author‘s passion, too. 8mo
10 likes2 comments
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Well-ReadNeck
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Pickpick

Interesting book about trees and how they thrive, communicate and live. Good non-fiction pick.

My goal was to finish this one before the end of the year. Done. Even under time for the #25b42019 #readathon

I‘ll likely pick up something new tomorrow and make it to 24 hours before the clock strikes midnight, but this will very likely be my last completed book of 2018!!

Avatar.of.sonia Finished it a couple of days ago... what an eye opener!! 9mo
Blaire I just bought this!! I heard about it on fresh air I think and have been wanting to read it for a while. 9mo
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Emilymdxn
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Pickpick

Such an important book that I wish everyone would read. I had no idea trees and forests were so complex, interconnected, social and intelligent. I can‘t even remember the last time i learned this much from a book i don‘t think. This made me feel like the natural world is even more beautiful and worth protecting than I knew, and it was wonderful.

Sarina.Dahlan Adding to my ‘to read‘ list. Thank you for sharing. 9mo
ElenaBaer I thought the same thing!! Made me want to change careers and study the forest. (I didn‘t. I‘m still a teacher.) 9mo
rwmg Sounds intriguing. Wishlisted 9mo
Emilymdxn @Sarina.Dahlan @rwmg thank you 😊 9mo
Emilymdxn @ElenaBaer lol me too! Still work in an office but I definitely planned to become a forest warden for a while while I was reading it! 9mo
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Emilymdxn
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Home from a fun party relatively early (parents need to cook for a big lunch tomorrow so couldn‘t be out late) and reading in my favourite corner 💖

jmofo I really enjoyed this book! I hope you do too! 9mo
Emilymdxn @jmofo I love it so far!! 🥰 9mo
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Emilymdxn
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I‘m making an early start on my resolution to learn more about the natural world and the environment where I live - I‘ve been getting so into climate change activism recently (as much as I can living in a small town with no organisation for this kind of thing, I basically just bother my MP constantly with my one friend who joins me) but realised the other day I can only actually recognise two types of tree. Trying to learn more about where I live

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Tamra
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Pickpick

There is a lot going on in the woods that I didn‘t know! This is a very quick read and highly informative. Will be checking out the illustrated version as a soon as it‘s available via the library.

Prairiegirl_reading I wish I would have known there was an illustrated version before I bought this! 9mo
Tamra @Prairiegirl_reading it‘s okay to have 2! 9mo
Prairiegirl_reading @Tamra haha! Good point! 9mo
84 likes1 stack add3 comments
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N8ure
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LittleMummyMe
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A new book started, pyjamas on and cicadas singing outside... lovely evening. 🌙

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LittleMummyMe
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WanderingBookaneer
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Prairiegirl_reading I wish I would‘ve known there was going to be an illustrated version! I would‘ve waited to buy it! 12mo
89 likes1 stack add2 comments
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mynamerhymes
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Pickpick

🌲🌳🌲 A good audiobook to listen to while driving to and from the national park. Very accessible, although the author indulged a penchant for anthropomorphizing trees. I can't fault him, since his honest passion for forests was evident.

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BookishShelly
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Pickpick

I love trees and find them to be interesting, so this little book was great for me. (It‘s raining or I would have taken a pic of the book with trees.)

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Suelizbeth
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Pickpick

I‘m ashamed that it took me so long to finish this book as it is eminently readable and I loved it! It got buried in a pile and unearthed due to a September readathon, thank goodness. I am obsessed with trees, and this book satisfied my obsession, completely. I think that J.R.R. Tolkien was prescient in his creation of his tree beings, the Ent. Trees communicate and migrate and care for each other. They are amazing! Read this book!⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

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ReadingEnvy
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Pickpick

I was inspired to read this book after reading The Overstory by Richard Powers, to learn more about the science of trees.

Included are how trees communicate, migration patterns, how and why trees hibernate, their place in ecosystems and more. Wohlleben manages a forest in Germany and directly addresses some of the misinformation he learned in forestry classes.
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#hoopla #scienceseptember

73 likes4 stack adds
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ReadingEnvy
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WanderingBookaneer I loved this book. 12mo
ReadingEnvy @WanderingBookaneer it's fascinating 12mo
JamieArc If you like reading about trees, make sure to put The Overstory on your list. It made me realize how much I love reading about trees! 12mo
WanderingBookaneer It is already on my list, but I‘ll bump it up! 12mo
ReadingEnvy @JamieArc that's what reminded me to read this one actually 12mo
55 likes2 stack adds5 comments
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jmofo
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#FFFS #FallingForFallSwap after the holiday weekend delay and some shipping mishap Robert Stack might have something to say about, my swap and I caught the bus to the post office. Package due 3-10 days. This is my first time filling out a customs form for a package so that was fun! 😘🎉🍂🍁🗺

Avanders 👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽💛🧡🎃🍁🍂🎃🧡💛 12mo
28 likes1 comment
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amyf0x
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Pickpick

A charming, fascinating explanation of how trees are born, grow, and die, as well as the relationships that help them thrive. Highly recommended!

Read July 12-24
Book 30/50

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GondorGirl
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Mehso-so

I just finished this audio book and hit eight hours read for the #24in48 readathon! Time to take a brief break while I run the vacuum and decide what to read next.

As for this book it was a really interesting look at trees- how the communicate, reproduce, coexist... If you like this kind of nonfiction, it was really well done. If you're not a fan of learning every single detail about something- skip it.

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GondorGirl
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We got our wedding pictures! Ah! Listening to this audio book while I look through them!

We had our wedding party each bring their favorite book.

#24in48

IamIamIam Fabulous!!! You guys look fantastic! 14mo
GypsyKat Beautiful!!! 💜💜💜 14mo
Mollyanna Gorgeous! I love it. 14mo
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Bookzombie Love this! 14mo
LiteraryinLititz Love this picture!! 14mo
Tomigirl44 Brilliant! 💗 14mo
sprainedbrain This is awesome!! 😍 14mo
Ddzmini Love the colors and the books where just a fantastic idea 😋📖 14mo
81 likes9 comments
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jlowery999
Panpan

Reads like a text book. Disjointed writing, chapter topics jump all over the place. Definitely a few interesting tidbits but not enough to keep me interested for a whole book length.

KtCakes22 What happened to "Don't write a book about trees"? ? 14mo
jlowery999 Implied lol 14mo
1 like2 comments
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CuriousG
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Have 2 audiobook listens on the go right now - I like to bounce back and forth between them depending on my mood. #riotgrams #audiobook #audiobooks #dayfourteen

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kathedron
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Bailedbailed

Oh, no! There's so much fascinating stuff here, he clearly loves the trees and I want to cheer him on for acknowledging them as intelligent beings but the anthropomorphism is off the scale! It makes the trees seem "less". Can we really only appreciate and care about "the other" to the extent to which we recognise ourselves in them? That's less a celebration of trees and more an indictment of humans. ?

Cathythoughts Interesting point. Don‘t know the book. But trees can be metaphors for us .... wild flowers 💕.... ( I think Oscar Wilde has a story about this ) Tulips ( super ego of flowers?? ) anyway don‘t know book , so I guess I should 🤐 I‘m on flowers but , I can think of similar trees. (edited) 1y
wanderinglynn Sadly, I think there is a segment that has to be able to relate to a species, whether animal or plant, before truly caring beyond a perfunctory thought. Consider wildlife trafficking-it‘s estimated that 1 African elephant is poached every 15 minutes. 100,000 African elephants were killed by poachers from 2010 to 2012. But where is the outrage? But 1 lion, who was given a name (Cecil), is killed and tremendous outrage. 👇🏻 1y
wanderinglynn I think that may indicate that a segment of the population needs to be able to relate to the species beyond that of biology or even ecological conservation. So that giving an animal a name (e.g., Cecil) makes it more relatable to us. I‘d posit it may be the same with trees & other plants (haven‘t read the book). 1y
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kathedron @Cathythoughts Sure, metaphors are my bread and butter! 😊 I love trees and I wanted to read about *them* rather than humans with bark and leaves (so it felt!), so it's gone back to the library, unfinished. 1y
kathedron @wanderinglynn Sadly, I think you have a valid point there. 1y
Moray_Reads I felt exactly the same. I wanted this book to be worn by someone with more of a science background target than someone who says trees scream when they're thirsty and make friends with each other 😬 1y
mhillis Oh no! I have been meaning to read this for about a year. 1y
kathedron @mhillis I was sooo disappointed! 😖 1y
43 likes8 comments
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Deborah42
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Pickpick

I was riveted by Wohlleben‘s love letter to forest life and I don‘t think I‘ll ever see a walk in the woods the same way.

He describes a forest as a social network, a family that does the same things as human families do—they protect their children and support them as they grow, warn each other of danger, and share nutrients with sick trees.

Time to go hug a tree!

#readathon

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DivineDiana
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So glad that our daughter gave her Dad a book for one of his birthday gifts! #booksarethebestgifts #icanreadittoo

AmyG This was a fascinating book. I realized I knew absolutely nothing about trees. 1y
DivineDiana @AmyG Want to learn more! 🌳 1y
92 likes2 comments
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Lindy
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Next up in #audiobook: an Australian mystery that I‘ve been saving for my journey home to Canada from Slovakia.

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Lindy
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Pickpick

This was a reread (re-listen) and just as fascinating the second time through. I like the way the author writes about trees as sentient beings: parenting saplings; supporting and communicating with each other; street trees are compared to young people with no parental control. So many interesting facts; trees are amazing. #translation #audiobook

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Lindy
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Every walk in the forest is like taking a shower in oxygen.

Tanisha_A Love such trails! 1y
Lindy @Tanisha_A Me too. This is Exhibition Road in the Waitakere Ranges near Auckland. 1y
Jaimelire Gorgeous 1y
63 likes3 comments
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Lindy
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Trees, it turns out, have a completely different way of communicating: they use scent.

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Isn‘t that a great book? 1y
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Lindy
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A tree‘s most important means of staying connected to other trees is a “wood wide web” of soil fungi that connects vegetation in an intimate network that allows the sharing of an enormous amount of information and goods.

Lcsmcat Fascinating! 1y
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Currey
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Pickpick

#Nonfiction2018 Wohlleben‘s shares his insights into forest families and communities with deft storytelling skills. The science is backed up in footnotes but the core of the book balances the wonders we are just finding out about with the wonders we do not yet know. He often prefers to use words that most scientists would find inappropriate, such as the tree “remembers” or the the mother tree “nurtures”, but this makes for a better telling.

Riveted_Reader_Melissa I really liked this one too! 1y
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