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The Purpose of Power
The Purpose of Power: How We Come Together When We Fall Apart | Alicia Garza
An essential guide to building transformative movements to address the challenges of our time, from one of the countrys leading organizers and a co-creator of Black Lives Matter In 2013, Alicia Garza wrote what she called a love letter to Black people on Facebook, in the aftermath of the acquittal of the man who murdered seventeen-year-old Trayvon Martin. Garza wrote: Black people. I love you. I love us. Our lives matter. With the speed and networking capacities of social media, #BlackLivesMatter became the hashtag heard round the world. But Garza knew even then that hashtags dont start movementspeople do. Long before #BlackLivesMatter became a rallying cry for this generation, Garza had spent the better part of two decades learning and unlearning some hard lessons about organizing. The lessons she offers are different from the rules for radicals that animated earlier generations of activists, and diverge from the charismatic, patriarchal model of the American civil rights movement. She reflects instead on how making room amongst the woke for those who are still awakening can inspire and activate more people to fight for the world we all deserve. This is the story of one womans lessons through years of bringing people together to create change. Most of all, it is a new paradigm for change for a new generation of changemakers, from the mind and heart behind one of the most important movements of our time.
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid Sorry for the late post, I was off to dinner and a movie with my mother this Fathers Day. 😂

How did you feel about the end of this book, wrap up well for you? Are you ready for the next? I really appreciated all of it, so much experience learned in a fairly young life, and I‘m so glad she shared it.😉

Bookwormjillk I liked it. The history of the movement was interesting, and I was fascinated by her lessons learned while leading a movement. I feel like she should write a management book next. 1w
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vlwelser I've missed you all. But planning to jump back in for the next book. 1w
MallenNC I liked this one too. I liked that it was a guidebook as well as a memoir. I learned about her and her work, as well as how organizing/activism works. 1w
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Bookwormjillk & @MallenNC yes, I‘m not sure what I was expecting but the guidebook, pros & cons & pitfalls to watch out for while being an organizer and organizing as a job…wasn‘t what I expected at all. And in the end I‘m glad it wasn‘t, I was expecting more a history of that specific moment in time and that organization, but I got so much more out of it. (edited) 1w
31 likes7 comments
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid, posting this one a bit earlier today because I‘m headed out to visit my grandmother today and cell coverage will probably be spotty.

This read is wrapping up nicely for me, but I have to say as I watched the beginning of the Jan 6th commission broadcasts, I‘m getting excited? (I‘m sure that‘s not the right word, anticipatory maybe) to start our next read about “Culture Warlords” about the dark side of the web. How about you?

Bookwormjillk I was really interested in the parts where she talked about taking credit for the movement and men taking credit for women‘s work. Also fit well with the footage I saw from yesterday‘s marches and a good companion to my bookclub book 2w
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Bookwormjillk It fit well for me with things I‘d read before…. Like Coretta Scott King‘s story. I‘ll definitely check out the one you tagged. 2w
Bookwormjillk @Riveted_Reader_Melissa thanks for the rec! 2w
staci.reads I appreciated the way she compared popular fronts and united fronts and stressed the value of both, but pushed that it's actually the united front that can be more problematic. "I think we are so comfortable with those who agree with us that we fear being challenged." I loved this section: "We need movements that can hold complexity so that we can learn to reach for one another, even when reaching for one another makes us uncomfortable." 2w
staci.reads @Bookwormjillk I also found that part interesting. I like that she talked about how they could have taken "the movement belongs to no one" stance and taken what some would see as the high road, but that move, that unwillingness to call people out on the erasing of women's (especially Black women's) accomplishments, is why it is still common today. I love that they consistently said no, he didn't do that. 2w
MallenNC I thought this was interesting to read at this moment of March for Our Lives and other efforts for gun law reform. Especially when she talked about the mistake of wanting only allies who agree with you 100 % vs working with people who agree on one thing on that greater goal. I hope that will be happening this time. 2w
MallenNC I finished the book because it‘s due back at the library so I‘ll go ahead and say I liked her approach. It was more of a guidebook than just a memoir and she provided a lot to learn from and consider. 2w
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @staci.reads Yes, that distinction between popular and united fronts was such an interesting one that I had not heard expressed that way before. And yes @MallenNC wouldn‘t it be great if that could come to the fore this time about that particular topic where so much of the country agrees on the same common sense reforms, but yet can‘t get those passed because of extremes at either end. (edited) 2w
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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And a bit of Cascade for this #Pantone2022 challenge 😉

@Clwojick

Clwojick Ooooo perfect! 2w
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Pickpick

Very good book about the real work it takes to change an idea into a movement, to actually organize messy humans to a united goal, to make any real change. I found it very informative, and I‘ll never think that real work looks like it quite so effortlessly just happened…. But more importantly for me I liked the underlying message the most…the “how we come together when we fall apart”, because that part right there, the fact that we keep ⤵️

Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ waking up to these challenges and tackling them, and how we go about doing that, over & over & over again, says so much about the people we really are or aim to be. (edited) 2w
Riveted_Reader_Melissa #SheSaid….Sorry, I read ahead and finished this one 🤷‍♀️ 2w
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid I hope the beginning of June is treating you well. I‘m finally past the very busy last week in May and caught up in my reading for this book again (yay me 😂, it really is the little things in life).

Lots of good stuff I found in these last few chapters, about the little things from textbooks to what is considered common in “common sense” and how all of that shapes the larger conversation about what is even considered possible.

Smrloomis 👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽 being caught up on your reading feels good 😊 3w
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MallenNC I got caught up too. Early May is busy in my job and it took a while to recover. I appreciate the real life way she shares how organizing/really becoming involved differs from just donating or following a cause. And what it takes to turn interest into real involvement. 3w
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @MallenNC Yay for both of us! It‘s amazing how good that feels sometimes 😂 3w
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @MallenNC I really liked that too, and about how important the little battles (cultural battles) have become….scary to think about for me when I see the work the other side has done and it coming to fruition now in front of our eyes. 3w
staci.reads Her comments about the importance of building a base that is moved toward action and how social media participation does not equate with a solid base made sense to me. 3w
staci.reads I also found her thoughts on political education interesting. Especially using political education to make people discontent with the status quo. 3w
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staci.reads
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Pickpick

Finished up the #SheSaid early so I could get my overdue book returned 🙈
Garza mixes her insight into politics of the past couple decades and stories of her own experiences organizing into a book about power structures and change.
This was a good read, with moments of great.
@Riveted_Reader_Melissa

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ravenlee
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Pickpick

I went ahead and finished #SheSaid because it‘s a library book. I learned a lot of Garza‘s account of learning to organize, about what a movement is and isn‘t, dispersed leadership as opposed to leaderless, and so much more. She‘s clear and concise about where BLM has succeeded and where it failed, and has good ideas about where to go from this point. Recommended.

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid! I hope you all has a nice week, despite the real life traumatic stories in our news lately. We need some more movements to organize people.

I‘m a bit behind on my reading this week, so please go ahead and start discussing without me…. Hopefully I can catch up and jump back in the discussion later tonight.

And don‘t forget that Culture Warlords by Talia Lavin is next, and to put in your library holds.

staci.reads I liked the way she responded to those who disparage identity politics. She equates white experience to a control group in scientific experiments. "The control group is what happens when there is no change of what is constant. It is what has not been experimented on; it is what the experiment is compared to in order to see if there has been any change. ⬇️ 1mo
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staci.reads "In the United States, white people, white culture, and white experiences are the controlled against which everything else is compared." 1mo
ravenlee The identity politics explanation was very interesting to me, too. I find the way she explains concepts very clear, without being pedantic. She would be a good teacher. I‘ve gotten confused about the sections now as I finished the book, unfortunately. Her writing is so easy to just keep reading. 1mo
Bookwormjillk Really great explanations of identity politics and interesting viewpoints on feminism. 1mo
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ravenlee
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Again #SheSaid & #DeadPhilosophersSociety #ThisLife collide:
“Capitalism, a system that prioritizes profits over people, powered by the exploitation of labor and resources for the benefit of elites and corporations, follows the logic of individualism, which teaches that we must compete against one another to survive. Capitalism monetizes everything, creating a dynamic in which absolutely everything, including movements, can be bought or sold.”

TheBookHippie Disgusting 🤢 1mo
GingerAntics True and disgusting. 1mo
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ravenlee
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Tying together my #SheSaid and #DeadPhilosophersSociety #ThisLife reading, again.

“Power is about who makes the rules , and the reality is that most of us lack real power, even over the decisions that are closest to us. Sure, I am empowered to decide what I eat for breakfast today, but larger forces create the options I can choose from — or whether or not breakfast is even available to me.”

@GingerAntics @TheBookHippie @kspenmoll

TheBookHippie 💯💯💯💯 1mo
TheBookHippie This book when I read it I was yelling YES THAT THIS almost every page… 1mo
GingerAntics This really does tie in well. I need to read this book now, I think. 1mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid, sorry for the late start today. Got busy with other plans and just now settling in back at home.

Ready to discuss, even if a bit late on my end 😉

Bookwormjillk I thought her observations of the 2016 election were fascinating. 1mo
ravenlee @Bookwormjillk exactly - the whole idea that not having a specific plan let all the candidates get away with avoiding the whole issue was eye-opening. And candidates (Sanders) actually leaving forums because they were questioned on something they didn‘t want to answer smacks of taking dollies and dishes and going home. 1mo
staci.reads I liked her discussion about decentralizing leadership and being careful not to replicate power structures by only rebranding, not actual disruption of systems. 1mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid. Lots of good detail about the hard work of organizing underneath the “easy” by pure luck myths. I particularly liked the way she explained intersectionality as breaking down the us vs them mentality that has been used to subjugate many groups for so long with the old divide & conquer. How are you doing on this weeks sections?

Suet624 Shoot! I‘m so late! I need to find the book! 1mo
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AllDebooks I think the intersectionality part is the best bit of the book in an outstanding book. I will reread this many times as I think there is so much information to take in. Great pick. Thanks for organising x @Riveted_Reader_Melissa 1mo
MallenNC I thought chapter 9‘s focus on the challenges of trying to build solidarity without losing focus on the unique issues that face Black Americans was very strong. No easy solutions offered, but by drawing attention to it, that chapter made me think. (edited) 1mo
ravenlee I was very taken with the difficulty of finding balance within a movement or organization. The importance of having BOTH interracial needs and needs of individual communities met, and how challenging that can be. And the explanation of intersectionality (which has been mentioned in several books we‘ve/I‘ve been reading) was so clear and compelling. None of our issues exist in a vacuum. 1mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Suet624 When you find it, join in whenever you can. These discussions will be here to join whenever you are ready. 😉 1mo
Bookwormjillk This was a great section. It feels like a master class in organizing. Great book. 1mo
staci.reads I liked her comments about "shifting people from spectators to strategists" There are so many keyboard warriors who want to show solidarity on social media, but when action is required, they don't actually want to have skin in the game. Like she says, "What people are willing to do on social media doesn't always transfer into what they're willing to do in their everyday lives." 1mo
staci.reads @AllDebooks @ravenlee I also liked the way she explained intersectionality as "a framework by which we examine how groups that experience double or triple discrimination get their needs met at the same time, not in spite of, groups in the same situation." It's not about ranking discrimination, it's about making sure no one gets left behind. 1mo
ncsufoxes Intersectionality is such a key to understanding so much about what happens in our society. In grad school I‘ve spent a lot of time learning about Crenshaw‘s work (www.aapf.org). Her Ted Talk is excellent but very triggering at the end, I cried the whole time, #sayhername. I‘ve learned so much from Garza on what it takes to become more engaged in activism. Every chapter points out something new & of course points out things that I didn‘t 1mo
ncsufoxes understand because of my sheltered upbringing. Although we work really hard with our kids to have these open discussions about movements like BLM as well as intersectionality. We want them to understand how important it is to understand these principles & how they work in society. My oldest is taking ethnic literature for his senior English class (they are the first class to take this course this year). He enjoys it but his teacher is always 1mo
ncsufoxes amazed by how much he knows about all of this stuff. But I also feel that for the most part kids this age are more savvy & are more socially conscious (more than I was at 17). I think my rambling point is that people like Garza have paved the path for more young people to be more involved in activism & trying to dismantle the constant & systematic challenges within our society. 1mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @ncsufoxes I think they have much more opportunity to meet diverse people, and from a fairly young age, for all the internet faults and pitfalls, my nephew had friends overseas that he played with on Xbox live while still in middle school, so his friend group was much more expansive just to start, it‘s what they do with that that matters….do they just learn how to curse in more languages or learn what those other people are going through, and how 1mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ⤵️ much alike the human experience is dispute all the cool and weird stuff that makes people & cultures unique. And that‘s where good parenting (role models) comes in, are they learning and growing there as they play or learning bad lessons. I guess like any other socialization, a mixed bag. (edited) 1mo
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AllDebooks
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1. Tagged; Wonderland - a year of Britain's wildlife, day by day; Jane Austen at home and Flight behaviour
2. Barbara Kingsolver's vivid novel is intoxicating. You can smell the woods, see and feel the Monarchs delicate movements as they unexpectedly arrive at a new roosting site.
3. All the above, I'm outside every day 😍#happyplace #naturenut

@rachelsbrittain #weekendreads

AllDebooks 2. (Cont.)The implications this has for the species could be catastrophic. Kingsolver explores the impact of fossil fuel dependency and climate change on our natural world and humans. An incredible novel that lays bare the scientists struggle to understand the change in behaviour and what it means for the future of the Monarch butterfly. Trots off to finish it.
1mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid I hope you are having a great day despite many more reasons to get organizing lately! Right now I‘m really appreciating this unvarnished look at the real work it takes to organize people to accomplish any goal, even “just” protesting. I have a feeling we will all be protesting more in the current environment we live in.

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Anybody else watching the news lately and feeling like we picked the right book at the right time again! 🙄 Sadly because our world remains crazy. 2mo
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Readergrrl I‘m not familiar with this read along, but I‘d love to join…especially in these times! 2mo
ravenlee I found the bit about leaders having to balance between addressing the needs of the community in question and keeping the peace with the powers that be - and there‘s no way to strike that balance successfully. Nobody with a prominent position can afford to risk it, and is therefore inherently unable to do what actually needs to be done. 2mo
ravenlee And yes, absolutely, this is a well-timed read. As so frequently seems to happen! 2mo
Bookwormjillk @Riveted_Reader_Melissa @ravenlee yes, right book at the right time. I too am appreciating a look at the ins and outs of organizing. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Readergrrl We‘d love to have you join us, feel free to grab this one and catch-up/join in whenever you are ready. And put the next one on hold if that sounds interesting to you too. (edited) 2mo
ncsufoxes Clearly I‘m behind…I found it fascinating how she went from developing a hash tag in response to Trayvon Martin‘s murder & the trail to being on the ground in Ferguson in 2014. Black Lives Matter evolved very quickly & I was amazed to read about the amount of work they did in Ferguson & how long they stayed on the ground. I found her criticisms of Obama very interesting, she makes a lot of good points. That unfortunately his talking points just 1mo
ncsufoxes became more sensationalized sound bits for the right wing. The part about Jesse Jackson & Al Sharpton was very interesting. She highlights that they come in & tell people to not disrupt anything but to go home, be quiet, & vote. Whereas the BLM movement is all about being vocal & continuously bringing forth what is going wrong. “Hashtags don‘t build movements. People do.” 1mo
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AllDebooks
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Catching up on the #SheSaid choice read for May. Already so engaged and enamoured by Alicia Garza and her story. What an amazing woman 😍📚

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid I hope you are all having a good week & maybe getting some warmth from the change of seasons no matter which hemisphere you are in 😉.

I‘m learning a lot about the complexities of community organizing in this section, I knew the idea before, but this really explains some of the divergent groups that need to find common ground, and how things sold as “common good” might not be really. Devil‘s in the details (and fine print)!

MallenNC I really enjoyed the parts about her work with POWER and how they dealt with the city‘s plan to put in underground power lines. It was very clearly meant to force residents to move out so more “desirable” (richer) people could move in. 2mo
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ravenlee I agree, the inside look into community organizing was eye-opening. And I liked the reminder that we can‘t make blanket statements about what Black communities (or really any communities) want, because the individuals all have such different perspectives. I also really liked her way of turning biased statements into questions to make people think about their prejudices. 2mo
staci.reads @ravenlee I appreciated that too. The story of her froup from POWER visiting the African American history museum together and what a powerful experience that was for them 2mo
staci.reads I really liked the way she defined empowerment vs. power and clarified the difference and the necessity of gaining power when you are organizing. "Unless empowerment is transformed into power, not much will change about our environments."
2mo
staci.reads I loved too the advice her coworkergave her when starting out..."Starting a campaign is like starting a fist fight. Sometimes you Just need to punch someone in the face, step back, and see what happens." ? 2mo
staci.reads I also made connections to the recent essay in The 1619 Project "Traffic" when she talked about how the San Francisco subway system doesn't serve Bayview Hunter's Point and so essentially cuts them off from access to better resources and many job opportunities. That's the kind of urban planning that creates and reinforces segregation which the essay was pointing out, but using Atlanta as the example. 2mo
Bookwormjillk I thought the inside look at organizing was very illuminating as well. I wasn‘t expecting management lessons when I started this book but that‘s (part of) what I‘m getting. 2mo
AllDebooks This is just incredible, Alicia gives us a very honest account of growing up in America. For me, the personal side of her story and how she came to be involved in activism is fascinating, alongside the social issues, politics, poverty, inequality and segregation. I'm getting so much from this book. 2mo
AllDebooks @staci.reads me too, actually lol as it's such a truthful comment 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @AllDebooks I‘m so glad you are enjoying it! 2mo
ncsufoxes I loved learning about how she got into community activism but also realizing how exhausting it must be since there are so many areas to have to fight against. Her work in the Bay View area opened my eyes to many things I did not think about & how they all intersect. Like not realizing where you live & the types of grocery stores that are available to your community. When your only options are fast food or pre-packaged food they are not optimal 2mo
ncsufoxes To your health. Then lack of adequate medical care. When you aren‘t eating healthy foods it not only affects your health but your ability to learn. Dr Nadine Burke-Harris discusses her work as a pediatrician in this area of CA in The Deepest Well. Plus you add on the housing issues which the government has been messing with for years (The Color of Law). When you have all of these forces working against people it makes it so hard to break free from 2mo
ncsufoxes When all that the system has done is to work to keep you down. I‘ve probably gone off on a tangent because I‘ve seen this all before from my work in doing home visits in lots of Section 8 neighborhoods. It just infuriates me to now learn & realize that the system was designed like this for a reason. This book has helped me to connect the dots of what I was seeing & why it is the way it is. I really admire Garza & find her inspirational 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @ncsufoxes The Color of Law is a fantastic book, I‘ll definitely look for The Deepest Well now too. It‘s amazing once you get into it how much everything is connected, this section showed how “beautification” projects to benefit a community could basically be weaponized against them, and yes, there are a million tiny battles like that to be had everywhere everyday it seems. A never-ending fight. And then I look at the other side…and how they⤵️ (edited) 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ systematically and long-termed their fights against everything from voting rights, to affirmative action, to now abortion rights…which they lost and instead of accepting the will of the majority to go forward, created a school of thought about the constitution, raised and promoted judges based in that, and then took advantage of every nominating process to deny and stymie other judges and push through theirs until they had enough votes ⤵️ 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ that they were sure they could count on, to overturn those long fought for gains…so they have to be fought for again. And some of that literally has come down to just deciding not to hold hearings on judge nominations until your person/group is in power to nominate your preferred choices. Scary the long-term work the other-side has done when you really think about it. Not to mention things you thought that were good, from the beautification 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ project in this book to big national projects like the interstate highway system that employed during the Great Depression and united the country and then learn it was also used to basically imminent domain many minority communities out of existence. You grow up in school basically learning these fights are done, won, and settled… we need people to relearn that they are never-ending and ongoing, and need boots on the ground everyday to keep.⤵️ 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ and sadly that is where we lose a lot of good people, they never learn the more after those pat school white-washed lessons. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @ncsufoxes Oprah has a special coming out (or recently came out) that I need to track down and watch. “The Color of Care”…. The tagline was “what if I told you the biggest indicator of how long you are going to live….was your zip code” (edited) 2mo
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AllDebooks
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High expectations for this from the amazing co-founder of Black Lives Matter, Alicia Garza.
I'm thrilled to be reading along. Need to play catch-up first. #SheSaid
@Riveted_Reader_Melissa

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Glad to have you join us! 2mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Hello #SheSaid. Lots of info in this chapter, but a great background on US politics, how & why we got here and how much of this is very relevant to the world we find ourselves dealing with now.

How are you doing with this weeks chapters?

Great quote for me:

“I began to understand that difference was a source of strength and power, that being on the outside provided a different vantage point—one with potentially more range and insight.”

staci.reads So much to digest in Chapter 2! She does a fantastic job of summarizing and highlighting a lot of complicated history here. 2mo
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staci.reads I enjoyed how she traced the rise of today's conservative power block. She identifies how they mobilized and came together despite the social conservatives, neoconservatives, corporate Republicans, amd religious right all having vastly different agendas and beliefs. 2mo
staci.reads "What's important to understand about the right as it evolved in this period is that it's a coalition of factions with distinct concerns, viewpoints, long term and short term visions, and ideologies. They come together on things they can agree on in the interest of building and maintaining power." (14) She then identifies race as one of those issues they could agree on. "The Secret engine of their movement has always been race." (17) 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @staci.reads Yes! She did a great job, fairly succinctly summarizing a huge political movement, why it rose as a movement and what it did with its power, so much info, that could have been books upon books itself, summarized quickly so it didn‘t take over her whole book, but also gave you the background you needed if you weren‘t knowledgeable about a lot of it. 2mo
staci.reads She also does a fantastic job showing how Reagan-era politics and policies demonized Black people and the welfare system. I was a yochild during those years but old enough to remember the rhetoric she is referencing. I remember my parents complaining about Reagan and the effect his policies were having on working class people. I'm wondering in our middle class, majority white community, were they even aware of the effects on Black communities?
2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa I‘m just a bit older than her, so tween when MTV came out….and I could finally see it (country girl/no cable for the longest time). And when we moved again, I found myself insisting it be a channel we got. Lots of actual music then, much with social commentary, and MTV news was news (no wonder I loved John Stewart later). Definitely a lot that I could relate too, and I love that she related that social and political synergy as part of her story. (edited) 2mo
staci.reads I also found her discussion of gangsta rap especially interesting having just read the essay "Music" in The 1619 Project. "There were congressional hearings about gangsta rap but no hearings on poverty in black communities, no hearings to determine why the most salient avenue for economic progress was dealing drugs, no hearings to define the role that street organizations played in urban communities... "⬇️
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa @staci.reads I‘m thinking probably not… it just wasn‘t as known then, even after the Rodney King video and the millions of cell phone videos since, so much is still colored by Reagan‘s talking points. Trickledown economics (Voodoo Economics) never worked for anyone but the rich, and we are still giving tax breaks to the wealthiest, but don‘t have the money to pass soft infrastructure like childcare/elder care. And I think many in that ⤵️ 2mo
staci.reads ...or how they provided family for kids in areas where families had been decimated by drug addiction, poverty, incarceration, or violence." As usual, society is outraged by the response to injustice, but not the injustice itself. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️in that environment absorbed those messages of…it‘s really bad for us working class people, because of those minorities abusing the system…the old welfare queen shtick. Always easier to blame the “other” poorer people, when if we don‘t both sides might get together & blame the wealthy. Same in the plantation era as the Trumpian one sadly. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @staci.reads Yes. There is always someone or something to blame but the guys (mostly guys) making the policies. 2mo
staci.reads @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I appreciated that too, her ability to move between the political/policy and social/pop culture worlds and show the connections. I especially love reading anything about Madonna 😁 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @staci.reads but I also remember the same type hearings a few years later when the “white” bands got too vocal and they wanted to censor them in the Clinton years. Only to find once again that the bands they thought they could hold up as scapegoats actually sat down to testify and were smart, educated, and well-spoken. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @staci.reads She was such an icon of our youth. The famous romp in the white bridal lingerie at the MTV music awards that caused shock & panic, I laugh about it now, because she was completely covered, more than any girl on any beach in the western world…. But boy did people have a fit. Probably some of my earliest feminist thoughts as a youth…why the fuss? Why the censure? Like a Virgin, Papa Don‘t Preach, Like a Prayer…great stuff. 2mo
staci.reads @Riveted_Reader_Melissa My folks thought he was a clown. His shtick and the term "Trickle-down economics" always resulted in eye rolls and/or choice words. I agree though that the 'divide and conquer' tactic used against the middle and lower classes to keep them from uniting is as old as time. Fear tactics are always at the center of that strategy, and unfortunately, fear of 'others' is the common trope. 2mo
ravenlee I found this summary of the rise of the right so helpful and concise. We got some of this from Hood Feminism, but this seemed clearer to me. It‘s interesting to read this as I also follow Heather Cox Richardson‘s daily news updates, and seeing so much of this continuing to be problematic. Nothing changes if nothing changes, right? 2mo
ravenlee I‘m a few months younger than Garza, so I can relate to a lot of her experiences (though I didn‘t live in the States and have access to cable television until the early 90s). I remember Reagan being this friendly, kindly, grandfatherly figure in the news, without knowing anything about him or his politica, and the more I learn the more sickened I feel. I had a conversation with my mom about him not long ago and she said she never trusted him. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @ravenlee I‘m really amazed at how much she managed to summarize in 1 chapter, and have make sense without being overly long. That‘s really hard to do with years of politics. 2mo
ravenlee But I never knew any of it. As a military brat I had a slight awareness of the policies that affected my family (I recall Dukakis wanted to cut funding for the military, to the tune that we would have had to pay all of our own moving expenses to return to the States - our mock election in my elementary school that year had an unsurprising something like 92% vote for Bush). I feel like my childhood was a lie in many ways. 2mo
MallenNC Sorry I‘m late to commenting! Her summary of recent history of politics and it‘s effects on Black Americans was very well done and I think will set a good foundation for the story of her work. I also liked how she described getting involved in organizing, working with others toward a common goal. 2mo
ncsufoxes I love how she provides a good overview of the era. I‘m a few years older than Garza & I remember a lot of what she discusses but she brought up so much that I did not know. I remember the whole war on drugs (& doing D.A.R.E.). I remember the whole ban on music (which my parents let us listen to whatever we wanted & bought us stuff that had warnings on it). But now learning how horrible all of these policies were & continue to reverberate 2mo
ncsufoxes Throughout so many communities today. It just all makes me so sad & frustrated. As I child I didn‘t understand any of what was happening but now I have such a perspective. I remember most of these events but I grew up in a tiny town in NJ so I grew up fairly isolated from the world. I just think about all the long lasting effects that all of these bad policies still have a reach into today. 2mo
Bookwormjillk There‘s some good stuff in these chapters. I love how she includes the history as well as the nuts and bolts of organizing. For anyone interested in Reagan‘s welfare policies I recommend 2mo
Singout Like others here, I‘m a few years older and Canadian, so my memories of the Reagan era are more the foreign policy than internal changes. Her explanation of the move toward the right, with clear definitions of economic terms is really helpful. The same kinds of cutbacks and economic changes happened in my part of Canada 27 years ago, and racialized communities continue to bear the brunt of it. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @ncsufoxes very similar background here, small town in PA. I think the first time as a growing being I realized something was really wrong wrong with Reagan….besides just bad things happen sometimes, totally unintended… was when Iran/Contra broke and I realized the people who had been giving me the wholesome “the is your brain, this is your brain on drugs” smashed egg thing and seemed like good advice, were also helping to essentially ship ⤵️ 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ in those drugs and look the other way. It amazes me today that Oliver North has re-emerged as a political figure of note these days. But I guess I shouldn‘t be surprised since Politics are cycling around again. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Singout So much of the policies of NeoConservatism infected the world, Reagan was a good spokesman, and Leader of the Free World, and so much of those policy ideas found receptive ears elsewhere. Thatcherism in the UK definitely had strong symbiosis there, I was just talking to someone else on Litsy who was reading about her look lasting shadow and it‘s effects. Very similar….so I‘m not surprised other countries had similar movements. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Singout and you can see it today, with Trump sadly. Have you been watching the French election stuff. The opponent there was a candidate with very Trumpian sounding views, luckily she lost. But in Brazil the candidate that was more Trumpian won. I guess it means those views (especially the one‘s rooted in blaming the other) can find fertile ground anywhere. (edited) 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @MallenNC You are never late, hop on whenever you finish & have time, even if it‘s a week (or weeks) later. 😉. And yes, her history of organizing worked so well with that background laid out. I remember when Obama ran and they kind of poked fun at his “organizing” background. But it‘s hard work, and makes very logical sense to me that a public leader would have started in that area. If you can‘t organize people on the local level, why ⤵️ 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa Would you be good at it on the State or National level. Unless of course you have no interest in organizing people 🤷‍♀️ 2mo
MallenNC @Riveted_Reader_Melissa I thought about the way Obama‘s work as an organizer was portrayed — it was made to sound like he didn‘t have a real job, when it was actually hard, important work. 2mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Happy holidays for those that celebrate with family this weekend #SheSaid

Just a short intro and beginning chapter to get us into the new read this weekend. What did you think so far? Any expectations going into it?

MallenNC I liked what she had to say about her mother and that each generation answers to challenges in its own way. (BTWI am looking forward to getting more of her story. I never really like reading introductions; I just want to get to it!) 2mo
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tenar Seconding what you shared @MallenNC it had me thinking a lot about how different people with different backgrounds might approach the challenges we‘re facing today, and how even success might look different to different people, but I really wanted to keep reading and hear more! 2mo
MallenNC @tenar Thats something I remember from Hood Feminism — Mikki Kendall made the point that successfully managing an issue might look different in different communities, and what feminism is can be expressed differently. 2mo
Singout I really like what she says about movements bubbling up rather than being started by really specific people, and her story of being taught how to be assertive and independent by her mother as a child. 2mo
staci.reads It spoke to me when she says "We inherit movements. We recommit to them over and over again even when they break our hearts, because they are essential to our survival." I think about the sign I've seen women holding at rallies saying "I can't believe we still have to protest this shit" or something to that effect. We inherit movements because change is slow and incremental. Sometimes that is heartbreaking, but we keep going because we have to. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @staci.reads Yes…. And sometimes the things we think we fought & won, the other side works at overturning for years and then does it… so we have to fight all over. 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Singout Yes, I really loved that water metaphor too, including this “Movements are much more like waves than they are like light switches. Waves ebb and flow, but they are perpetual, their starting point unknown, their ending point undetermined, their ⤵️ 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ↪️ direction dependent upon the conditions that surround them and the barriers that obstruct them. We inherit movements. We recommit to them over and over again even when they break our hearts, because they are essential to our survival.” 2mo
ravenlee I can only agree with all that‘s been said already, and say that I‘m interested to see where we go from here. I‘m not really sure what to expect, so I‘ve got an open mind. 2mo
Bookwormjillk I‘m catching up post vacation. This was a really promising start. I loved when she said if you think a movement stared without organization you probably weren‘t that close to the movement. I see these types of assumptions all the time from people who have never taken the time to do the work. 2mo
ncsufoxes I read this book last year, so I‘m excited to hear others thoughts. I loved this book & her journey as a community activist. I love when she says, “My time, place, & conditions powerfully shaped how I see the world & how I‘ve come to think about change.” To me that‘s such a powerful statement. I think the more I have seen & understanding more about the inequities of the system(s), the more I change. 2mo
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Singout

Survival and dignity were priorities, but to fight for them meant taking on challenges of economics, sex and gender politics, and race. These were also my first lessons in intersectional feminism: consent, success, choice, agency, pleasure, access to information, and access to contraception, up to and including abortion, were essential elements of true sexual equality. I knew that Black women in particular were often denied access to these things.

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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The next book schedule is ready #SheSaid!

So put in your library requests, holds, & interlibrary loans! 😉

vlwelser 😘 3mo
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ImperfectCJ @Riveted_Reader_Melissa Hi, Melissa! Please remove me from the tag list for now. I'm not able to keep up with the group read at the moment. 3mo
Bookwormjillk I would love to be added thanks! 3mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @ImperfectCJ Will Do, just let me know when and if you want added back in the future.😉 3mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Bookwormjillk Welcome! Great to have you join us! 3mo
MallenNC My book should come in at the library soon. It‘s “in transit”. 3mo
Singout I really like what she says about movements bubbling up rather than being started by really specific people, and her story of being taught how to be assertive and independent by her mother as a child. (edited) 2mo
AllDebooks This looks interesting, I'd love to join in please @Riveted_Reader_Melissa 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @AllDebooks I‘ll add you to the tag list. Happy to have you join us. 2mo
AllDebooks @Riveted_Reader_Melissa yay, thank you. I'll play catch-up this week. Is this the tag? #shesaid 2mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @AllDebooks Yes it is, and the chapters aren‘t too long, so it shouldn‘t be too hard to catch up. 2mo
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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I‘ll try to get the schedule up later today.

But if you want to join and haven‘t picked up the book or put in your library hold, now is the time. 😉

#SheSaid

TheBookHippie Oh this is good! Enjoy. 3mo
vlwelser This is a good one. But I'm going to skip this round. Leave me in the distro list though. 3mo
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @vlwelser Ok, I‘ll keep you in the list! 😉 3mo
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review
lowellette
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Pickpick

A look at organizing strategies and a community organizer memoir wrapped in one, written by one of the co-founders of the #blacklivesmatter movement.

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vlwelser
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#BookSpinBingo update! I actually finished for the first time since last August.

Tagged is my latest favorite.
😊=good
🌟=really good
❤=amazing

@TheAromaofBooks

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! A fantastic month!!! 1y
Kdgordon88 Well done! 1y
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review
vlwelser
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Pickpick

I'm totally in love with this book. It may not be totally rational to be in love with an inanimate object but if this book were a human, I'd want to marry it.

#BookSpinBingo square 6 and that's it. Totally done. Like finished, complete and not just giving up.
@TheAromaofBooks

Megabooks 👍🏻👍🏻 1y
TheAromaofBooks Yay!! Fabulous month!!! 1y
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review
ncsufoxes
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Pickpick

Alicia Garza is one of the original founders of Black Lives Matter movement. She discussed her background and her work in activism. She also highlighted a lot of the last 20-30 years and how politics shaped the criminalization of black people and culture. As you can see all the annotations I marked, I thought it was very insightful. The more I learn the more I rethink everything I grew up learning. #integrateyourbookshelf

ncsufoxes One book finally done on my Bingo board (needless to say I‘ve had a hard time focusing for the last week or so). #bookspinbingo @TheAromaofBooks 1y
TheAromaofBooks Great progress!! 1y
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ncsufoxes
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#bookspinbingo for January 2021, hopefully I can get some good reads in this month

TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 1y
Singout I just started Girl with the Louding Voice! And Hood Feminism is *so* good. (edited) 3mo
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review
underground_bks
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Pickpick

In The Purpose of Power, Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza reflects on the key lessons she‘s learned as an activist and organizer and sets forth some guidance for the essentials needed for successful social justice movements in the 21st century: decentralized leadership, formal organization, diverse representation in decision-making, and more.

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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This one was released today.... it looks so good!!!

Riveted_Reader_Melissa Be prepared #SheSaid, this will most likely be one of our reads next year. 😉 2y
kspenmoll Stacked!! Thanks! 2y
GingerAntics This looks good! 2y
daisyheadmaesie I haven't ever seen this book before! Looks interesting. 2y
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