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Behave
Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst | Robert M. Sapolsky
17 posts | 9 read | 7 reading | 56 to read
Why do we do the things we do? Over a decade in the making, this game-changing book is Robert Sapolsky's genre-shattering attempt to answer that question as fully as perhaps only he could, looking at it from every angle. Sapolsky's storytelling concept is delightful but it also has a powerful intrinsic logic: he starts by looking at the factors that bear on a person's reaction in the precise moment a behavior occurs, and then hops back in time from there, in stages, ultimately ending up at the deep history of our species and its genetic inheritance. And so the first category of explanation is the neurobiological one. What goes on in a person's brain a second before the behavior happens? Then he pulls out to a slightly larger field of vision, a little earlier in time: What sight, sound, or smell triggers the nervous system to produce that behavior? And then, what hormones act hours to days earlier to change how responsive that individual is to the stimuli which trigger the nervous system? By now, he has increased our field of vision so that we are thinking about neurobiology and the sensory world of our environment and endocrinology in trying to explain what happened. Sapolsky keeps going--next to what features of the environment affected that person's brain, and then back to the childhood of the individual, and then to their genetic makeup. Finally, he expands the view to encompass factors larger than that one individual. How culture has shaped that individual's group, what ecological factors helped shape that culture, and on and on, back to evolutionary factors thousands and even millions of years old. The result is one of the most dazzling tours de horizon of the science of human behavior ever attempted, a majestic synthesis that harvests cutting-edge research across a range of disciplines to provide a subtle and nuanced perspective on why we ultimately do the things we do...for good and for ill. Sapolsky builds on this understanding to wrestle with some of our deepest and thorniest questions relating to tribalism and xenophobia, hierarchy and competition, morality and free will, and war and peace. Wise, humane, often very funny, Behave is a towering achievement, powerfully humanizing, and downright heroic in its own right.
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Vivlio_Gnosi
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Adding this #nerdy #biological look at human behavior to my #TBR stack. #Nonfiction #GreenvilleSC why do we do what we do?? Guess I'll find out!

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speljamr
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Pickpick

If this wasn't science book of the year when it was published it sure as hell should have been. I've never come across a book that does such an excellent job explaining the complexity of this subject. Robert Sapolsky's writing is perfect for the layman trying to understand complex scientific topics. His Stanford lectures on YouTube are just as good. Everyone should read this book if you care anything about why we behave and react the way we do.

97 likes15 stack adds
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RowReads1
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😸

Lcsmcat I ❤️ your mug! 4mo
40 likes1 comment
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speljamr
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Oh, this chapter title alone makes this an interesting one.

Erinreadsthebooks It‘s so true! 😂 5mo
kspenmoll Perfect!!!!😂 5mo
Tanisha_A 😂 5mo
Moony 😂 sounds good! 5mo
103 likes5 stack adds5 comments
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speljamr
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And this is why teenagers do stupid things...

Deifio And then when we're thirty we can finally look back and think: "Man, we did stupid stuff!"? 5mo
speljamr @Deifio Exactly. That what was I thinking part of life. 5mo
MelissaSue81 Yep. I was actually reading something recently that new research suggests that a bunch parts of the brain go through a major overhaul during adolescence which contributes to not only the stupid decisions but the wild emotions as well. 5mo
melissajayne Learned that at the Body World exhibit I saw a number of years back. 5mo
97 likes4 comments
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speljamr
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Enjoying a day off work to do my own thing. Starting out with a sausage and cheese omelette and some exploration of synapses and neurotransmitters.

#BookAndBreakfast #BookNBreakfast

95 likes2 stack adds
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speljamr
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1. Apple
2. Reading it right now, Behave by Robert Sapolsky.
3. V for Vendetta
4. In a chair with my book.

@Eggs #WondrousWednesday

Eggs #4: 📚💕📚🤗 5mo
75 likes1 comment
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Chrissyreadit
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#work #gratitude30 It can be challenging to explain my actual job, but I love what I do- in a nutshell supporting children, teens and families to be healthy, safe and connected with healthy safe relationships.

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Notnightingale
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Putting this one on the read soon list. Has anyone read this book?

Megabooks I have not, but welcome to Litsy! 😁🎉 #LitsyWelcomeWagon @LitsyWelcomeWagon 10mo
Eggs Welcome to Litsy 👍🏼🎉 10mo
See All 12 Comments
RaimeyGallant Not yet. And welcome to Litsy! #LitsyWelcomeWagon Some of us put together Litsy tips to help new Littens navigate the site. It's the link in my bio on my page in case you need it. Or if you prefer how-to videos, @chelleo put some together at the link in her bio. @LitsyWelcomeWagon 10mo
rather_be_reading welcome to litsy!! 📚☕📚 10mo
Notnightingale @RaimeyGallant thanks! Appreciate your help. 10mo
RaimeyGallant My pleasure! 9mo
RaimeyGallant My pleasure! 9mo
Aimeesue Welcome! 9mo
DebinHawaii Welcome to Litsy!! 🎉📚🎉Hope you are enjoying it here! 9mo
ttran26 Currently reading. Dense but insightful and better than a class lecture. Definitely have to put time into reading this to understand what the author is saying though. Worth the time. Author has a science-y sense of humor 😂 8mo
6 likes1 stack add12 comments
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LauraJ
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Thinking this author is not a good first date.

C.Perone 😁 1y
emilyhaldi 🤣 1y
34 likes2 stack adds2 comments
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AnuVinod

If you pay lots of attention to where boundaries are, you pay less attention to complete pictures.

subinalex Am reading this currently. 1y
1 like1 comment
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KellyMuser
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Pickpick

A look at the factors that bear on a person's behavior that considers what happened from milliseconds, to millions of years before it occurred. I recommend it for anyone with an interest in human behavior, and in finding out what things might help bring out the best in us.

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Floresj
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Pickpick

This was easily one of the best books I read in 2017/18! There was so much fascinating information packed into 645 pages😳! It wasn't a quick read as it explained how we think, develop, and how culture and our biology affect our morality and free will, war and peace, competition, and male vs female. I learned a lot, and I was really impressed with Sapolsky's ability to explain evidence based science and make me laugh repeatedly.

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taning
Pickpick

There is a lot that goes into why we do what we do

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Susan
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This book was really interesting. Probably need to listen to it again or pick up the book.

2 likes1 stack add
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SubwayBookReview
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Ashley: "Oh wow, this is crazy. The first time I told you about my book, Leaves of Grass, was in October 2014 and I was on my way to meet Emily for a date. We're married now and just had our second anniversary. Today I'm reading Behave. It's about why we do what we do and debunks the myth that your genes determine who you are. It's very challenging to read and very rewarding. It's taking me as long to read as Leaves of Grass."

MrBook 😎👌🏻 2y
LiteraryinLititz What a sweet story! 2y
mrozzz I KNOW THIS GUY 2y
TheWordJar Awww! This is great! 2y
77 likes3 stack adds4 comments
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jdtchicago

The brain is heavily influenced by genes. But from birth through young adulthood, the part of the human brain that most defines us (frontal cortex) is less a product of the genes with which you started life than of what life has thrown at you...it is the least constrained by genes and most sculpted by experience...Ironically, it seems that the genetic program of human brain development has evolved to...free the frontal cortext from genes.

bookwrm526 I haven't read this one, but his book about the baboons he studied made me cry 2y
44 likes2 stack adds1 comment