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Me and White Supremacy
Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor | Layla F. Saad
"Layla Saad moves her readers from their heads into their hearts, and ultimately, into their practice. We won't end white supremacy through an intellectual understanding alone; we must put that understanding into action." Robin DiAngelo, author of New York Times bestseller White Fragility Based off the original workbook, Me and White Supremacy teaches readers how to dismantle the privilege within themselves so that they can stop (often unconsciously) inflicting damage on people of color, and in turn, help other white people do better, too. When Layla Saad began an Instagram challenge called #meandwhitesupremacy, she never predicted it would spread as widely as it did. She encouraged people to own up and share their racist behaviors, big and small. She was looking for truth, and she got it. Thousands of people participated in the challenge, and over 90,000 people downloaded the Me and White Supremacy Workbook. The updated and expanded Me and White Supremacy takes the work deeper by adding more historical and cultural contexts, sharing moving stories and anecdotes, and including expanded definitions, examples, and and further resources. Awareness leads to action, and action leads to change. The numbers show that readers are ready to do this worklet's give it to them.
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unabridgedchick
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Looks like a cat had lunch while I had lunch!

TrishB Least it‘s just the book mark! 8mo
Tamra Chipping away at white supremacy, one bite at a time! 😆 8mo
10 likes3 comments
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Erin.Elizabeth10
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Pickpick

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Essential reading for people who hold white privilege and live in cultures of white supremacy. I will be returning to this book and using the journaling prompts in the future. Thankful for Layla F. Saad and her work.

11 likes2 stack adds
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HeatherBookNerd
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Pickpick

I got this on audio not realizing it is actually a workbook, so a paperback would be better. There are 28 days of topics on racism that are briefly discussed, followed by questions for personal reflection and journaling. The material includes nuanced discussions of everything from white fragility to white centering to cultural appropriation. It is great for someone who is committed to examining their own participation in white supremacy.

Come-read-with-me I loved this book! 11mo
41 likes1 comment
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behudd
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Pickpick

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️This workbook is helpful in looking at all different aspects of racism, white supremacy, and anti-Blackness in your life. The journaling aspect is valuable and challenging as it forces you to think through what you're reading and how it impacts *you* ¬ just "white people in general," which is easier. I recommend it for anyone trying to figure out how to grow in antiracism work&beyond. Saad is accessible& understanding but unyielding.

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JaqyLantern
Mehso-so

This book should be paired with other resources. This is a work book with several journal prompts. I feel that the sections didnt have enough information to make the prompts truly beneficial.
Sociological essays and other booms can be used to build around the topics in the book for better understanding and the ability to truly look within a peraon's self

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MandaMT
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Pickpick

I was off Litsy for a few months. I fished this during that time. Below is my write up from my “Top 10(ish) Favorite Books of 2020. TLDR: It changed my life. 👇

MandaMT This book has impacted my year more than any other. It had been sitting on my shelf unread. After the murder of George Floyd I wanted to get into more serious reading. I posted on social media to see if anyone wanted to read it with me. I figured shared accountability would keep me on track. I thought the book club would meet a handful of times over the summer. We‘ve met every week for the last 7 months. 12mo
MandaMT Saad‘s work is uncomfortable by design. It calls for the reader to reflect deeply on personal experiences and uncover biases. I don‘t think I would have gotten as far into it on my own. 12mo
MandaMT After completing it we moved on to Kendi‘s How to be an Antiracist, shared relevant podcasts and other BIPOC centered media, and gotten involved in projects like the Vote Forward letter writing campaign. I‘m pretty terrible about finding social outlets and staying connected. The pandemic has made this even worse. Having a consistent meeting has really helped. It‘s also kept me focused on racial justice even when its not all over my newsfeed. 12mo
Reggie This is great you were able to find people that helped and motivated you and that you got something out of it. I keep seeing it B&N and tell myself to pick it up but I haven‘t yet. 12mo
19 likes1 stack add4 comments
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unabridgedchick
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Today has a real feel of -11 so I'm daydreaming about my garden and juggling two reads: ME AND WHITE SUPREMACY and THE HEIRESS GETS A DUKE. I plan to start seedlings this weekend and I cannot wait. What are you reading this weekend?

2 likes1 stack add
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sdbruening
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Pickpick

I learned many new concepts from this audiobook, including white apathy, white exceptionalism, tokenism, white saviorism, and optical allyship as well as the harm of color blindness and perfectionism. It was a lot of “don‘t do this” and very little “do this.” I want to do better, and while there is a lot of good self-reflection here, there isn‘t a lot of help on how to be better to combat the problems presented here.

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sdbruening
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violabrain
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Pickpick

I have done a lot of reading and work around anti-racism over the years, but doing all of the writing prompts in this book really helped me clarify the work I still have to do and gave me my next steps.

16 likes4 stack adds
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bookishbitch
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Pickpick

If you don't feel called out by this book you're reading it wrong. This isn't just a book though, there is homework. And it is uncomfortable. I think this is another important book for any antiracist library.

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Chelsea.Poole
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Pickpick

"...from exhaustion and heartbreak to inspiration, determination, and more."
So necessary even if you think you've read enough. I found so many things to work on and think about in these pages. Outstanding. A vital part for every #antiracism reading list.

Ms.Story That‘s is a beautiful quilt! 😍 1y
Chelsea.Poole @Ms.Story thanks! It's on my bed currently 😊 1y
88 likes2 comments
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sleepy.ash87
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Pickpick

An excellent book geared to help others develop cultural sensitivity, a critical consciousness, and deeper, emotional understanding of how they have contributed to an unjust system which can be dismantled with appropriate action. I am part of a group that has met on a weekly basis to discuss our answers to the reading prompts. I love the simplicity and richness of the readings which can clearly reach many audiences.

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ImperfectCJ
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Pickpick

The intellectual and emotional work of anti-racism isn't new to me, but the daily approach of this book helped reveal connections and ways of thinking that I hadn't been as conscious of before. I appreciate that Saad ended by having readers commit to completing three anti-racism goals in the next two weeks. I already have more books lined up, but this step has helped me think of concrete, doable, outside-my-own-mind actions.

ImperfectCJ Tangential question: Have you ever decided not to read a book because of whose blurbs the publisher chose for the cover? I am, to say the least, not a fan of Elizabeth Gilbert and Glennon Doyle, and I almost gave this one a pass when I saw their blurbs. 1y
Bits @ImperfectCJ Great question! Some have given me pause but I don't think I've ever straight up passed on a book because of the author blurbs. 😂 I wonder how much control the author has as opposed to marketing about those things? 1y
ImperfectCJ @Bits It might depend on the author how much control they have over blurbs? Ages ago I interned at a publishing company and I might be remembering wrong, but I don't recall the authors having any input on blurbs. It probably says more about whom the publisher sees as the intended audience than it does about the book. My daughter said, "Why would I care what an author I don't like thinks about a book?" I think she has a point. 1y
60 likes3 comments
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sebrittainclark
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Pickpick

5/5

This book is 28 days of prompts to consider your role in perpetuating white supremacy. It is not an easy book. It took me 83 days of intense reflection, but of all the books I've read this summer to better educate myself, this was the most critical to stop viewing the problem as other people and start doing the actual work of antiracism myself. If you only read one book about antiracism, make it this one.

Christine Agreed. 1y
Gaylagal2 Thanks for tip and recommendation. On TBR!🤓 1y
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marleed
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Pickpick

This was my sixth non-fiction (authors male, female, gay, straight, American, non-American) focused on BLM since June, and I‘ll continue learning. I‘ve been reading this slowly all month, as instructed, and was at times conflicted which I recognize as my own white fragility. I am different on the other side of these books, and I didn‘t know I needed to be different.

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kspenmoll
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#integrateyourshelf #donutandcoffee #coffeeandbooks
#school equity
I just finished 16 hours of training on equity in our district along with 14 other district teachers. The first issue we decided to tackle is food equity. We do not have cafeterias in our 3 buildings (2 elementary,one for both MS & HS- we are that small!) We are quite fortunate in this predominantly white town as both our Superintendent & our school board support the initiate.

MyNamesParadise What a lovely reading spot! 1y
Scochrane26 The schools in my area of Ky are able to provide free breakfast & lunch to all the schools. It‘s a much-needed service. They have even fed kids through quarantine & summer. I think it‘s through a grant. 1y
ChasingOm Access to food is so important and something that often flies under the radar as an issue unless you‘ve actually experienced insecurity! ❤️ 1y
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kspenmoll @ChasingOm @Scochrane26 Most districts in CT do what Ky do. We have no cafeteria, so no federal/state food program. We do have a grant to provide food for those in need.we are looking at quality, nutrition, & student input. 1y
ChasingOm @Scochrane26 What part of KY are you in? I‘m in WV on the KY/OH border. 😄 1y
Scochrane26 @ChasingOm I‘m right next to Lexington. 1y
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ImperfectCJ
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I'm on Day 16 of working through this book, and I'm finding my reactions interesting. I tend to read books as fast as I can, and it's been instructive to take this one bit by bit, as it's designed to be read. By Day 19, I should have a better idea of whether posting about reading this book is performative or not.

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sebrittainclark
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1. Me and White Supremacy by Layla F Saad, My Life in Plants by Katie Vaz, 10 Things I Hate About Pinky by Sandhya Menon

2. We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates (original quote by Thomas Miller, a South Carolina congressman post Reconstruction)

3. "You cannot dismantle what you cannot see. You cannot challenge what you do not understand." Me and White Supremacy by Layla F Saad

#weekendreads @rachelsbrittain

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bookishbitch
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Picked up my next social justice book club read today.

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AvidReader25
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Pickpick

I took so many notes during this one. I‘m still learning. Her explanation of white exceptionalism and prejudice vs. racism (the difference is who‘s in a position of power & can use their racism to hurt or take advantage of the other racial group) were important take aways.

“In essence white fragility looks like a white person taking the position of victim when it is in fact that white person has commited or participated in acts of racial harm.”

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GardenJess
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Two new checkouts from the digital library. Several of my digi holds came through. What to read first.....

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Jebpix
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Pickpick

I have so much more to learn but this book will be an important part of my journey. It is written to be interactive. Short chapters with journal prompts for 28 days. Can not recommend this enough.

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Jebpix
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One of many well-said, but awful, truths in this book.

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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Pickpick

I should probably be writing a nice sanitized review for this book. Along the lines of, no matter how much you think you know, there is always so much more work to be done....and it‘s an ongoing process, that you need to keep chipping away at... which is true, but seems like a disservice to this book‘s intent. So I‘ll add, personally I have a lot of work to do, and already know what some of my harder obstacles will be.... apathy, in these ⤵️

Riveted_Reader_Melissa ... surreal 2020 days where it feels like the whole world is falling apart, I‘m finding it very hard not to get apathetic about many things, and with COVID and my “preexisting conditions” I definitely haven‘t been participating as I should be. And calling out family, the times of Trumpism has made it very clear to me where some people stand....who I can call out and who I‘ve just cut out. Ugh, so much to take in and process, which was exactly... (edited) 2y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ...this book‘s intent and purpose, to make you take a long hard look at yourself and what you are doing and could/should do better.⤵️ (edited) 2y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ... On a lighter note, I‘ll admit, my first mistake was listening to this on audio...no matter how great the author‘s narration is, and it‘s phenomenal, it lends to letting it wash over you rather then reading, stopping, journaling as the work needs. I can‘t regret my decision now, but I will plan to revisit this at a later date, in a format I can read slowly. 2y
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KVanRead I feel you. It‘s hard not to get discouraged. 🖤 2y
Texreader I agree that apathy is definitely kicking in...the feeling of powerlessness is overwhelming. I appreciate your openness about this. It‘s a good reminder to look inward and try to do better. Hugs. 2y
Bookwomble I wonder if it's apathy or exhaustion? A combination of processing a bombardment of bad news stories, the expenditure of emotional energy required to reevaluate acquired, embedded beliefs, and of challenging the beliefs of some of your family. This is hard work - be kind to yourself 💖 2y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @Bookwomble I definitely think apathy and exhaustion go hand in hand, in many ways I think that‘s the point of our current system, keep throwing things at you at high speed so as you process the current, the outrage of a week ago gets forgotten, or if not forgotten, overshadowed by the 10 horrible things that have happened since then. I think it‘s a purposeful tactic in many ways, but it can swamp you to the point of shutting down and wanting... 2y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ...hid under your covers for the next (year to 4 years). The hibernate until it‘s over feeling, and tuning out, even for a few days in this time, feels like a dereliction of duty in many respects. So yes! Yes to all of that and thank you. It‘s a fine line, but we need to walk it, as this book reminds us, others don‘t have the luxury of hiding for awhile. 2y
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
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The boy statistic I‘m not surprised by, because of cases like Tamir Rice & Trayvon Martin, but I am surprised by girls by the age of 5! I shouldn‘t be since there is currently a girl in jail for not keeping up on cyber schooling during the pandemic while convicted white guys get out because of Covid.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.propublica.org/article/a-teenager-didnt-do-her-...

Riveted_Reader_Melissa What‘s sadder still is that I know I‘ve seen these statistics before, but I‘m still surprised by them. 2y
KVanRead 💔😡 2y
GingerAntics There is?! That‘s disturbing. How is putting her in jail helping her keep up with school? That‘s ridiculous. I think I‘ve seen them somewhere, too, but they are still shocking to read, maybe because they are SO ridiculous. 2y
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Riveted_Reader_Melissa @GingerAntics Here‘s the local story. ⤴️. Sorry it was juvenile detention....she was in juvenile detention before, but one of the conditions of parole was doing her schoolwork. However her teachers say she wasn‘t specifically behind any more than others, and any child with attention issues would have more trouble with online schooling. My problem is that it‘s ok to send a young vulnerable black kid back into a locked up facility, but the⤵️ 2y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa ..Manfort‘s of the world , convicted of crimes, get house arrest because of Covid risks. 2y
GingerAntics That is just disgusting. This poor kid. 2y
42 likes1 stack add8 comments
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Eggbeater
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Pickpick

This is enlightening, honest, and insightful book and it requires participation and ongoing hard work from the reader. The author knows that because I am white, I am complicit in some form of racism. So we can get the guilt out of the way, because I am not unique, and do something constructive to deal with it. These journal entries were grueling for me, but I feel like I learned important and continuing lessons if I want to be an ally.⬇

Eggbeater I am left feeling a little raw and dizzy and overloaded with new information. I have a lot of work to do. I am hoping to talk it over with my close friends and see what we can do also as a group. 2y
53 likes1 comment
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Christine
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Pickpick

I tried to read this long ago and quickly gave up. A 28-day journaling commitment? Yuck, I thought - I‘m not a journaler, and there are plenty of other books about racism calling to me from my TBR. But when a colleague set up a reading group w/weekly Zoom chats, I went for it. So glad I did. The work of this book is hugely worthwhile (no matter your background with the topics) if you‘re committed to antiracism and dismantling white supremacy. ⬇️

Christine If anyone is doing this book (or is considering it) and wants to discuss or debrief, reply or tag me! It was really helpful to do in (virtual) community, since the reflective journaling prompts can bring up all sorts of stuff. 2y
49 likes1 comment
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crazyspine
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Pickpick

I would recommend this for beginners looking to do anti-racist work and for people who need reminders. Each day she quotes some amazing texts, and ideally, I think it would be best to read those works in their entirety.

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kimmypete1
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I was trying to read this as an ebook from the library, but I just feel like this is more of a “in print” book for me so I picked up a copy. I think this will be easier for me to do the journaling.

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Sharpeipup
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For many years, I worked with exchange students and idioms were their favorite part of the English language so I would share the origins of many but I‘ve never heard of these until today. Have You?

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/625916/racist-origins-common-phrases

#readblackauthors

Hestapleton Thank you for sharing this! I hadn‘t questioned a lot of these phrases, but the explanation actually makes a lot of sense. 2y
Sharpeipup @Hestapleton Agreed! Oddly enough a friend was telling me about a discussion when her Mom used “Indian giver” recently. Her Mom admitted that she only uses it around people she loves... 2y
28 likes1 stack add2 comments
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nikirtehsuxlol
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RE: white feminism

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ONH
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⬆️ from Layla Saad‘s Instagram.

What 👏🏼 a 👏🏼 book👏🏼!!! I am so grateful for the work Ms. Saad has done/does in creating this workbook. This is one to revisit, and often. Her Instagram is also an excellent resource to follow for continued discourse and reminders to check in with the antiracist work we all need to keep doing.

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wicdiv
Pickpick

So I didn't realise this before starting but this book is actually a 28 day workbook that looks at several topics surrounding white privilege, giving the reader reflective questions at the end of each chapter/day which they should use in order to examine how they personally interact with white privilege and racism.

An interesting read and a unique and involving way to approach white privilege/racism.

crazyspine I just started this and didn't realize it either. Did you read it over the 28 days? Or faster/ longer? 2y
wicdiv @crazyspine no I read it in one go but I think it would work better over a longer period even if it was a week at once or something. The author definitely wants you to reflect and grow as you read it. 2y
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wicdiv
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MidnightBookGirl
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Pickpick

#IntegrateYourShelf I listened to the tagged book on audio, and now I'm reading the physical book and doing the journaling. I love that it's not just something to read- Saad makes you do the work to confront your own complency. It's tough but necessary. For YA readers, totally recommending The Hate U Give and I'm Not Dying With You Tonight.

Here are some TBR books I already own/bought/ordered to continue doing the work of anit-racism:

MidnightBookGirl How to Be an Antiracist
White Fragility
So You Want to Talk About Race
When They Call You a Terrorist
They Can't Kill Us All
Stamped From the Beginning
What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Blacker
The Fire This Time
2y
ChasingOm Nice list! 2y
Scochrane26 I started listening to Long Way Down this morning. It‘s ya but already powerful. 2y
MidnightBookGirl @Scochrane26 I feel in someways that Fiction does a better job of changing people's hearts, whereas Non-Fiction can help change our minds. But I also feel that Non-Fiction readers are already reading about something they want to learn more about, but picking up a YA book that looks entertaining but also introduces the reader to a new experience can reach people who need to have their hearts and eyes opened.
2y
Scochrane26 @MidnightBookGirl I agree. My youth group is going to meet next week, & were going to watch Just Mercy. They have been wanting to talk about some of these issues, but we haven‘t met lately because of covid. I think I‘m going to compile a YA list for them. I only have 5-6 youth at our church, but they have strong opinions. 2y
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ChasingOm
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These are all books that I‘ve either bought or finally picked up to read over the past month in order to educate myself more on anti-racism and how I can be an ally/co-conspirator. #IntegrateYourShelf

The tagged book has been on backorder this whole time, but I‘m not complaining because I think it‘s an important one for folx to be working with right now!

JamieArc I‘ve been reading The Color of Law but can only take small bits at a times. It‘s punch after punch of intentional racist injustice. 2y
Christine Agreed re: the tagged - I‘m working through the daily reflections with a group of about 40 work colleagues with weekly Zoom check-in meetings (we all have the e-book). An intense but very valuable experience. 2y
Eggbeater So You Want to Talk About Race was excellent! 2y
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MidnightBookGirl Suck a great book! I listened to the audiobook, and am now doing the daily journaling with the physical book. I also got to meet Layla Saad in Baltimore at a publishing dinner and book conference, and she was amazing! 2y
ChasingOm @Christine That sounds like an amazing (intense) project. @MidnightBookGirl My copy got here this week and I can‘t wait to start it! (I have to take this week off from NF — my anxiety was getting too high. 😬) 2y
kspenmoll Did you get Me and White Supremacy yet? I have an extra copy if interested. Email me at kdspenmoll@icloud.com 2y
ChasingOm Aw, thanks @kspenmoll but my copy came in last week! ❤️ 2y
62 likes7 comments
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Eggbeater
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I am not much of a non fiction reader, so this is a challenge for me. I am currently working through Me and White Supremacy, which is a book that has journaling questions to help me take a better look at my own complicity. It is not easy. I also want to read How to Be An Antiracist and White Fragility.

#Integrateyourshelf @ChasingOm @Emilymdxn

GingerAntics I think for those of us who think all people are equal and should be treated as such, that have never said or done racist things, it‘s hard to look at the situation and say “yeah, but I‘ve benefited.” It‘s the reality, though. I think the more we have these hard conversations with ourselves and others, that‘s the only real way we‘re going to ever have freedom and equality for all. 2y
GingerAntics I have the second two books on my TBR. I‘m going to have to look into the one you‘re reading right now. 2y
ChasingOm I have this one ordered, but it‘s been back ordered for over a month. (It‘s all good, I have plenty to read and I‘m glad her work is getting bought!) 2y
Emilymdxn I really want to read me and white supremacy! Having a book on this topic that really asks you hard questions and asks you to answer them is amazing 2y
MidnightBookGirl There's definitely fiction books that still present some of the same ideas/discussions- and I know you've read I'm Not Dying With You Tonight, and pretty sure you've read The Hate U Give. 2y
44 likes1 stack add5 comments
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MargaretPinardAuthor
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To listen to #LaylafSaad on this Fourth of July and read some #EdmundMorris too, wincing.

Ps it is hot in Sacramento! 🥵

#rainbows

29 likes2 stack adds
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nikirtehsuxlol
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On being an introvert and not partaking in white silence. #blacklivesmatter

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MidnightBookGirl
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Pickpick

I listened to and finished this amazing auidobook in June, but I'm re-reading the physical book more slowly, taking time to do the journal prompts and really work on becoming a good ancestor. Definitely recommending this to readers looking to do more than just read- to really dig into the work we all must do if we ever want to make this world of ours better.

Eggbeater I am halfway through the journal prompts on this one. 2y
kimmypete1 I‘m so behind. I started on hoopla before Wisconsin. But did no reading there and then it expired. I really think I might just want a physical copy. 2y
56 likes3 stack adds2 comments
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Victoria6
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Book #22: Another great recommendation from BLM to make me examine my own role in a society built on white supremacy.

4 likes1 stack add
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Verity
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Pickpick

Important reading and work that will challenge your internal sense of who you are.

20 likes1 stack add
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nikirtehsuxlol
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We must call a thing a thing.

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beaconhillbooks
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Pickpick

My favorite antiracism literature so far. Extremely readable. Each chapter has journaling questions for self education. I believe everyone should read this.

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Cinfhen
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Pickpick

This is a deep dive into self reflection. Layla Saad raises really strong emotions.
This is not a personal growth book to make you feel better about yourself, it‘s about EDUCATING yourself.
If I‘m being 100% honest not everything she said “SPOKE” to me nor did I find all of her revelations to be the uncontested truth, but I think this was a good place to start. Im grateful to the author for challenging me to do better.

marleed It‘s humbling to realize I am not better enough. ...But I‘m going to keep learning. 2y
Cinfhen That‘s all we can do @marleed #KeepOnLearning 2y
80 likes3 comments
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Maria514626
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Know better, do better (Maya Angelou)
At the beginning of the year I aimed to read a certain # of books about Asia (can‘t remember the #). My reading is so focused on the West.
I didn‘t think 🤦‍♀️ about LGBTQ+ or BIPOC authors or experiences—like Asia, I‘ve inadvertently neglected them.
Thanks to #integrateyourshelf I‘m adding other reading goals. Progress (61 books read):
5 BIPOC author or MC; 1 LGBTQ
Goals to come.
@Emilymdxn

ChasingOm Yay! Your tagged books is on my TBR. I‘ll read it once I receive it from my local bookstore — it‘s back ordered. 🎉 2y
Emilymdxn I really want to read the tagged book too! 2y
Maria514626 There are exercises at the end of each chapter. So ... it‘s a working read. Not finger pointy. But you definitely need to dig deep. @ChasingOm @Emilymdxn 2y
23 likes3 comments
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CoffeeK8
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Pickpick

This is a book I will read over and over again. It asks you to try for 28 days to address your own internalized racism. I dropped in and out of this library audiobook over the course of a week and I‘m going to have to buy it for myself and keep working on myself

kspenmoll I have heard good things about this book. Thanks for your review. 2y
Christine I‘m working through the daily reflections in this with a big group of work colleagues and am finding it very moving and helpful (as are most of the colleagues). 2y
52 likes3 stack adds2 comments
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CoffeeK8
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Today‘s #audiowalk & working in the garden.

CarolynM Beautiful 😍 2y
32 likes1 comment
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Qemorio
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“If you are a person who believes in love, justice, integrity, and equity for all people then you know that this work is nonnegotiable.”