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Where the Dead Sit Talking
Where the Dead Sit Talking | Brandon Hobson
12 posts | 15 read | 16 to read
Set in rural Oklahoma during the late 1980s, Where the Dead Sit Talking is a startling, authentically voiced and lyrically written Native American coming-of-age story. With his single mother in jail, Sequoyah, a fifteen-year-old Cherokee boy, is placed in foster care with the Troutt family. Literally and figuratively scarred by his mother's years of substance abuse, Sequoyah keeps mostly to himself, living with his emotions pressed deep below the surface. At least until he meets seventeen-year-old Rosemary, another youth staying with the Troutts. Sequoyah and Rosemary bond over their shared Native American background and tumultuous paths through the foster care system, but as Sequoyah's feelings toward Rosemary deepen, the precariousness of their lives and the scars of their pasts threaten to undo them both.
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OriginalCyn620
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Mehso-so

This was sad, heartbreaking, and also weird in some places. It reads like a stream of consciousness, which isn‘t my fave format. I didn‘t hate it but didn‘t love it either. #booked2019 #indigenousauthor

Cinfhen Pretty pic 🌸🌸🌸I agree, stream of consciousness doesn‘t work well for me, either 🙄 3mo
BarbaraTheBibliophage Sounds like a tough read, but a unique choice for the prompt. 👊🏻♥️📚 2mo
40 likes2 comments
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SphinxFeathers
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About to start this with my best friend. Looking forward to it very much. #catsoflitsy #indigenouslit #indigenousliterature #firstnations #brandonhobson

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ReadingEnvy
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Mehso-so

Where the Dead Sit Talking by Brandon Hobson is another read from the National Book Award finalist list. I felt like the life of Sequoyah, a teenaged foster boy, is well represented in how he views the world and interacts with others. The pacing of the book didn't work as well for me, as it tends to race through really important moments.

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mauveandrosysky
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Pickpick

This coming-of-age novel about about a Native American teenager placed into foster care in rural Oklahoma is written in such a compelling and unique voice. I wasn‘t prepared for how weird this book is, and I‘m not sure I can adequately explain the type of weird that it is. Ottessa Moshfegh blurbed one of the author‘s previous books, if that tells you anything. I loved it.

ohyeahthatgirl This made me glad I picked this one up. I love a good dose of weird! 9mo
Erinreadsthebooks Sold🙋 Sign me up for anything related to Ottessa M. 🙌🏼🎉 9mo
29 likes5 stack adds2 comments
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mklong
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Pickpick

Sequoyah is a teenager moving through the foster care system after his mother is sent to prison. Hobson writes so beautifully of the emotional toll their unstable upbringings have on Sequoyah, and the other two foster children in the home. It is never simply anger, or fear, or sadness, or loneliness, it is all of these feelings at once. Along with love, and relief, and guilt, and well…everything. These are characters I will not soon forget.

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Redwritinghood
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Mehso-so

From the NBA longlist: a Native American boy makes his way to a foster family with two other troubled teens. Throughout, the voice is calm, but there is a rage and trauma underneath that the narrator tries to tamp down. It occasionally comes out when he thinks of hurting others. Unfortunately, I didn‘t feel enough of that suppressed rage and the occasions when he made off-handed comments about shooting someone just seemed sensational. 3⭐️ #Hoopla

59 likes1 stack add
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8little_paws
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Pickpick

I found this so atmospheric and compelling. It's about how teens deal with trauma in their lives, while they are in the foster care system. It's also about losing touch with your culture and the desire to feel connected to it. The characters are heartbreaking. I did think the ending was a little too fast, still I couldn't stop listening to this story. I would have never heard about this if it were not for the NBA longlist, I'm glad I read it.

49 likes1 stack add
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jckphnx
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Bailedbailed

Sadly, this was just the wrong book at the wrong time. I just wasn‘t feeling it.

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Jolynne
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Pickpick

Sad and moving thoughts of a young Cherokee youth abandoned by his parents.

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shendrix413
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Panpan

I was excited about this book. I'm a member of the Cherokee tribe like the MC and the author and it involves kids in foster care which is where I work.... But, honestly, it was really weird... Just weird, there were thoughts and events that felt like they were just thrown in for shock or whatever. I was very close to bailing a few times, but I kept hoping it would tie together in the end, but no such luck. I'm honestly pretty disappointed 😢

Alfoster Hate it when that happens!😫 1y
53 likes1 comment
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BethFishReads
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This week I‘m featuring new coming-of-age stories. Descriptions on my blog or right here on Litsy. http://www.bethfishreads.com/2018/02/5-new-coming-of-age-novels.html?m=1

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TorieStorieS
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Mehso-so

Set in Oklahoma in 1989, this coming of age story is engaging from the first pages and maintains a fast pace. Unfortunately, though the characters feel authentic, I just never connected with any of them... but I think it could be a great book for discussion groups! #HappyShelfieSunday! #FebInBooks18 @bookisglee