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Oroonoko
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
16 posts | 31 read | 17 to read
"Oroonoko" by Aphra Behn is an important work of western literature. Published in 1688, it follows the tragic love story of Oroonoko and Imoinda, two Coromantin lovers. The two young people fall deeply in love with each other and are secretly married. Yet the king also loves Imoinda, and commands that she become a part of his harem. When he discovers that she has already lost her virginity, he secretly sells her as a slave. Because of his overwhelming guilt, the king lies to Oroonoko and says that Imoinda has died. Oroonoko carries on with his life without Imoinda. Yet he is later betrayed by a friend and is also sold into slavery. The two lovers are surprisingly reunited, and they continue their relationship. Imoinda becomes pregnant, and the two petition to be allowed to return to their homeland. Their request is denied, so Oroonoko organizes a slave revolt. The lovers plan to kill their oppressor, but Oroonoko is worried at how Imoinda will be treated if he is killed. They discuss their options, and they realize that the only way to escape this world with honor is for Imoinda to die. Oroonoko kills Imoinda, but he is too deep in mourning to carry out their original plan. Oroonoko is sentenced to death, but he stands stoically while his oppressors dismember him. A deeply moving and tragic tale of love and loss, "Oroonoko" stands as one of the first great English novels and a classic of the canon of Western fiction.
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review
andrew61
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Pickpick

#litsyclassics O book 25
Exposing the dark heart of colonialism aphra behn, spy, playwright, author in 1688 restoration England creates a story of the eponymous African noble prince exiled from his country, deceived into slavery who leads a slave revolt +suffers a dreadful end mirroring fate of charles1st body.
With thanks to 'in our time ' podcast for insight this is a fascinating novella by a woman exposing slavery + colonialism in a male wrld.

Sue Aphra Behn! 🙌 💜 9mo
andrew61 @Sue hi sue, this was the podcast i listened to if you are interested https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0977v4t 9mo
Sue Thanks! So few people have heard of Aphra Behn, I‘m always excited when she pops up. 9mo
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andrew61
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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#blackisthecolor #nofemmeber - second go at this after i realised that if i put a U in colour it would not come up on hashtag 😂
This is book 23 in my #LitsyClassics Atoz challenge and when it arrived in the post i thought what a beautiful little book and even better it fits in my pocket so i can take it to work with me. What a great idea 💡

batsy Clever take on the prompt! 10mo
30 likes1 comment
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ulrichyumiodd
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Mehso-so

Oroonoko faces an unexpected love triangle when his father-figure, the king, decides to claim the young man's wife for himself. The prince then spirals down in a tale of slavery and tragedy.

Aphra Behn is no doubt a precursor, and her book should be read for its historical value. However, digressions in the narrative were distracting, and issues of race are still problematic despite Behn's best effort. I also disliked the prince towards the end.

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Colethulu
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Cuddled up with one of the first English novels. #CurrentlyReading #catsoflitsy

CarolynM Welcome to Litsy 🌼 12mo
Lel2403 Welcome to Litsy 12mo
StillLookingForCarmenSanDiego Welcome to Litsy 📖💙 12mo
CoffeeNBooks Welcome to Litsy! The 🎉 12mo
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Weaponxgirl
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Pickpick

I came to this after Virginia Woolf laid the love on the author hard in a room of ones own. This is classed as an anti slavery book but it isn't really. Only anti slavery for certain types of people (royalty) but this book is so obviously ahead of its time and makes for an interesting read. It was a bit melodramatic for me if I'm honest and I did roll my eyes at certain plotting decisions but you could talk about this book for hours after reading

Weaponxgirl Hope you don't mind me tagging you @Eyelit but I saw your post about reading this and want to know what you though. (Also anyone else who've read it) 14mo
Eyelit Thanks for tagging! I liked this one, with caveats. I agree it was ahead of its time in quite a few aspects. I too was disappointed by the selective condoning of slavery. It also took me a bit to get past the language (omg the exclamations and extensive descriptions). But I liked the story and found it far more believable than Romeo & Juliet. Much more tragic, too. I‘ll seek out more of behn‘s work, for sure. 14mo
Eyelit I‘m surprised this isn‘t more talked about in classrooms, honestly. Cause you are right, it‘s a very discussable book. (edited) 14mo
Weaponxgirl @Eyelit yes, I found after a while the constant exclamations about how wonderful oroonoko and imoldia were off putting. I know it was the style but I did want to go show don't tell but obviously it was a different time period so what they were showing me wasn't necessarily stuff I found great. Poor tigers 14mo
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Eyelit
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Taking a break from graphic novels to read some classics... and my next read kinda fits the color scheme of my extra special treat (and hydration). #24in48

Weaponxgirl I just finished this last night! I wanna know what you think?! 14mo
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Leannr
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Me and Aphra Behn braving the snow to get to the pub!

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sprainedbrain
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Pickpick

I whipped through this so effortlessly... hard to believe it was written in the 1600s. The story flows right along, and considering the subject matter, I probably shouldn‘t have been surprised by how brutal it was. A quick but unsettling read.

⭐️⭐️⭐️

#1001books

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Riveted_Reader_Melissa
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Pickpick

Labeled Historical Fiction, this tale of a noble prince of Africa, his tragic love story, & the ignoble realities of slavery read much more like a fictional account of people & places the narrator knew, with many of the “characters” existing in that place & time & contemporaries of the author, with perhaps some license given to the noble savage narrative. But pulled from pieces of reality or completely imagined, the inhumanity of slavery is vivid

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LittleFawn2012
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
Pickpick

This book can definitely spark discussion on topics surrounding race and authority. Well written. More interesting than I bargained initially. Worth your time.

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Bambolina_81
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Book one toward my #Litsyclassics challenge is complete 😊

For a slender book I found this one took a while to get through because of Behn's writing style. It's the story of slavery, betrayal and love and has such a terribly sad ending. I've read some reviews that consider Behn to have suspect views on race and slavery but this was written in 17th century so I would expect her perspective to reflect that. Perhaps I'm in the minority?
@Sarah83

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Sarah83
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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21 likes1 stack add
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Gezemice
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Mehso-so

Oroonoko is the most well-known work of Aphra Behn, the first woman to make a living from writing, and is hailed as one of the first novels.

Oroonoko is a tragic love story and the betrayal and enslavement of a noble black prince. Behn chronicles the dehumanizing atrocities of slavery against him, yet endorses slavery as a whole - she only laments that it happens to royalty.

This story is a worthy read for its historical significance.⭐⭐⭐/5

Texreader Wow what an interesting take on slavery. I guess we mustn't forget how common slavery was for millennia around the world. And sadly still exists in horrific forms to this day. Never heard of this author. Thanks for the history lesson! 2y
Gezemice @Texreader I first read about her in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own, and I was intrigued, so I wanted to check her out. Yes, a weird mix of an anti-slavery yet for-slavery book. Kind of interesting but buffling viewpoint. 2y
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BarbaraBB
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Panpan

Despite its historical significance I am sorry to say I didn't enjoy this book much. Maybe it's the subject: slavery and colonialism. In The Netherlands we've been hearing about this all our lives. It is a part of our history not to be too proud of, and we learn about it during history lessons, hear about it on the news, see the documentaries and read the books. So maybe I am just a bit fed up with the subject.
#1001books

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Outtoconquer
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Pickpick

This book is a statement against slavery and what it can do to a man.

MrBook Nice pic! 2y
9 likes1 comment
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E.H.Kern
Oroonoko | Aphra Behn
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Pickpick

#Recommendsday According to Virginia Woolf, every woman who is a writer owns a debt of gratitude to Aphra Behn (1640-1689), the first woman in the Western world known to have supported herself only as a writer. Behn's Oroonoko is considered the first abolitionist novel.

BookishFeminist I need to read her--hadn't heard of her until this post! 3y
E.H.Kern @BookishFeminist Virginia Woolf talks quite a bit about her in 3y
BookishFeminist @E.H.Kern Probably why I haven't heard of her then--that's one of the few Virginia Woolf books I haven't read. Gotta fix that soon, maybe with Serial Reader. 3y
Sue Aphra Behn doesn't get talked about enough. She was so ahead of her time!! 3y
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