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The Address Book
The Address Book: What Our Street Addresses Reveal about Identity, Power, Race, and Wealth | Deirdre Mask
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AnneCecilie
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Pickpick

This book taught me so much about the importance of a street address. It‘s said somewhere in the book that getting a street address is the easiest way to get out of poverty.

I also loved how she used examples for all over the world including India, Berlin, Japan, Iran and South Africa. And how different cultures view streets differently and how street names can be political.

60 likes4 stack adds
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AnneCecilie
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In another study, Boroditsky and her collaborator, Alice Gaby, gave various subjects a set of pictures that, once placed in the right order, told a story - a man aging, for example, or a banana being eaten - and asked them to put the shuffled cards in order. English speakers arranged the pictures left to right, the same way the subjects read and write in their own language. Hebrew speakers would, on the other hand, organize the pictures in

AnneCecilie chronological order from right to left - the way they read and write. But the Kuuk Thaayore people arranged them in a pattern from east to west, a pattern that changed depending on the direction they were facing. If, for example, they were facing south, they placed the cards left to right. But if they were facing north, the order was switched from right to left. So Shelton‘s theory, connecting language to the way we think about space, makes a lot 4w
AnneCecilie of sense. 4w
BookwormM Fascinating 4w
38 likes3 comments
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Lillie
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My 4.5 star reads from Jan-Jun:

Go Tell It to the Mountain - James Baldwin
Notorious RBG - Irin Carmon
The Galaxy, and the Ground Within - Becky Chambers
A Master of Djinn - P. Djèlí Clark
The Address Book - Deirdre Mask
The Black House, The Lewis Man, The Chess Man - Peter May
Dead Land - Sara Paretsky
Deja Dead - Kathy Reichs
Faithless in Death - JD Robb
Murder on Cold Street - Sherry Thomas
The Yield - Tara June Winch

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Decalino
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Pickpick

This was an interesting, if somewhat uneven, book about the role that mapping, addresses and street names play in history, public health, citizenship, etc. Lots of interesting factoids.

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nocto
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Pickpick

This was excellent and fascinating! You know that being homeless and not having an address can make it impossible to get on in the modern world but this book digs way beneath that surface. History of how we got street names and numbers; explorations of the many places and people that don‘t have them and why; and the whole way that power is tied up in these seemingly innocuous details is explored here. Tons of citations to explore as well.

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nocto
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And here's my slightly late June #bookspin list. Two entries on it are hangovers from May that I've already started but nowhere near finished either of them and they are both kind of stalled so they can stay on the list and hopefully I'll get them finished this month!

nocto And, yay, it looks like I snuck my list in before @TheAromaOfBooks posted the numbers. Phew. 6mo
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! I'm getting ready to post the numbers in just a few minutes!! 6mo
2 likes2 comments
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Mitch
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Pickpick

Mask takes the issue of your address - across the globe, across time periods, across cultures and class divides to show just how important to health, economic success and an emotional rooting having an address is. She also examines the reasons you might want to shed the address - in terms of it's connect to state control, to taxation and suppression. A really fascinating read - has made me view lots of very things differently.

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Mitch
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Just a few chapters in and this book is fascinating..... Addresses as a way to be seen, to be counted, to have a bank account and to trace disease.

Sharpeipup Someone was talking about this book but they didn‘t know the name so thank. You! 7mo
Mitch @Sharpeipup it‘s really good! 7mo
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watermelontaco13
Bailedbailed

Boring AF. DNF

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Mitch
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The longlist looks good!
The Jhalak Prize is for writers of colour and always points me in the direction of something new. 👍🏼

ozma.of.oz I had never heard of this prize before! I‘ll have to look into it! ❤️ 9mo
charl08 I have three of these on my shelf! Now I feel like I am in the know. Thank you! (No, I haven't read them yet...) 9mo
Mitch @charl08 finger on the pulse!🤣 9mo
Megabooks The tagged book is fantastic!! 9mo
Mitch @Megabooks Ive had my eye on it a while! Glad it's a good one! 9mo
77 likes1 stack add5 comments
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shanaqui
Pickpick

Very interesting. I'm surprised looking back at it that I don't feel like I've come away with many things I didn't know, because while I read it I felt like there was a lot there. Very engagingly written.

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shanaqui

This one's proving really interesting and a surprisingly fast read. Should be a good fit for Postcrossing's blog, yay!

Speaking of which, I really need more books that feature mail, postcards, postal services, etc. Fiction or non-fiction, doesn't matter what genre, anything to do with mail is perfect. :D

rwmg Epistolary novels? EG 10mo
shanaqui @rwmg Yep, that's one of the books on my list, actually! It will be a reread. 9mo
rwmg Or rather less daunting 9mo
rwmg Then there is this: 9mo
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shanaqui
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To complete my trio, here's Hulk being deeply curious about the books I got myself this week. #BunniesofLitsy

BookishMarginalia Awwwwwwwww 10mo
rather_be_reading omg 😻 10mo
Howard_L Who‘s the author of The Restaurant? 7mo
Howard_L Thank you! Couldn‘t enlarge the picture on my phone. I added it to my TBR. 7mo
14 likes5 comments
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NotoriousMBG
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Pickpick

Addresses are never a thing that I gave any thought to. This book kind of echoed my experience with a book I read earlier in January - 99% Invisible City - and the reason I say that is because it made me think about not only the importance of addresses, but the relative...fluidity they can have. (continued in comments...)
#24in48 #readathon

NotoriousMBG This book takes the reader through distinct sections talking about not only addresses in different areas of the world, but the importance of even having a physical address to begin with. It's remarkable just how much addresses can affect daily life in any given place - from getting the basics to exist in society all the way to the political implications of naming streets. Utterly fascinating. 10mo
2 likes1 comment
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Come-read-with-me
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Pickpick

This was a fascinating read that delves into the politics & social justice tied into “address identity.“ Addresses are an indicator of influence & this book offers an amazingly rich historical context that helps the reader to better understand the need for social change. I was also intrigued with the concept of how our address helps us create a social identity & thought this meticulouly researched volume helped to clarify these ideas. Great read!

catiewithac Stacked! 12mo
Come-read-with-me @catiewithac It is so good! I really hope you like it. 12mo
sharread That sounds fascinating. 12mo
See All 9 Comments
Come-read-with-me @sharread I truly loved it. If you read it let me know what you think. 12mo
tpixie What an interesting theory for a book. I wonder if school choice would help equalize opportunities no matter where you lived. 12mo
Come-read-with-me @tpixie Thst‘s a really interesting idea. Based on my take away from the book, I think that school choice could certainly help to bring about change. If you read it please let me know what you think! 12mo
tpixie @Come-read-with-me Yes! I will thx! 12mo
angieinwonderland This was very interesting to delve into. The thing that discouraged me was the thought process then to now has not evolved a whole lot. I am going to add an urban planning book to my list this year if anyone knows one. 11mo
Come-read-with-me @angieinwonderland That's a great idea! Sadly I don't know of one, but I'll stay on the lookout! 11mo
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TracyReadsBooks
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Next up for my nonfiction reading. This is an ARC for a book that went on sale in May—it has languished in my TBR pile long enough. In this popular study the author not only visits cities and neighborhoods all over the world but also draws on examples from history to examine how limiting and, indeed, discriminatory it is not to have an address and, correspondingly, how empowering it is to have one. I‘m anticipating an interesting read.

Crazeedi I'm really wanting to read this too!! 12mo
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Well-ReadNeck
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Sharpeipup Did you like this one? It‘s been in my list but hard to find. 12mo
Well-ReadNeck @Sharpeipup Yes! I really enjoy micro histories. 12mo
47 likes2 comments
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Megabooks
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Pickpick

A fascinating look at how addresses shape the world. How do people in places from WV to Kolkata struggle living without a street address? Why did Quakers prefer numbered streets? Did you know you can buy an address in NYC? (Be careful that it really IS on Park Ave!) Why is Bobby Sands a popular street name in Iran? What about problematic street names in post-Nazi Germany and post-Apartheid South Africa? Each chapter got more interesting. 4⭐️🎧

Crazeedi Sounds like a great read!! 13mo
Megabooks @Crazeedi it really was!! (And thank you for the lovely note. 💙💙💙) 13mo
squirrelbrain Sounds fascinating - stacked! 13mo
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Hooked_on_books Interesting. Outside major cities in Ireland, there are no addresses. It‘s weird! 13mo
Megabooks @squirrelbrain I hope you enjoy it! 13mo
Megabooks @Hooked_on_books yes! It was amazing to see the diversity of ways of deciding addresses. I didn‘t write about the chapter on Japan, but there are no street names in Tokyo, and the numbering system sounds quite odd to this American! She also wrote about epidemiology in Haiti. The whole book is just fascinating! 13mo
Crazeedi @Megabooks 💗💗💗 13mo
Hooked_on_books Wait, no street names?!? How on earth would you find anything? 🤯 13mo
JamieArc Super interesting (and as a Quaker, really curious to read about that fact)! 13mo
Megabooks @Hooked_on_books that‘s why faxes are still so popular in Japan - to fax maps! Also there are lots of small constabularies. 13mo
Megabooks @JamieArc yes! I‘m not sure of modern Quaker thought, but in William Penn‘s time the days and months were First Day, Second Day instead of Monday, Tuesday and that was related. It also delves into Penn‘s life and other philosophies that helped shape Pennsylvania and especially Philadelphia. I hope if you read it that you find it interesting! 13mo
JamieArc @Megabooks I‘m sure I will! We still use that language when referring to Quaker things (we call Sunday First day). 13mo
Megabooks @JamieArc I‘m sorry I got the numbering wrong, but that‘s very interesting! I love learning new things about people and exchanging information. 💙 one of the great things about books/litsy!! 13mo
Reviewsbylola Fascinating! 13mo
Megabooks @Reviewsbylola I think you‘d enjoy this one. 13mo
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howjessicareads
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“Colonial New York played the handsome jock to nerdy Boston.” 🤣🤣

Megabooks I picked this up based on your early opinion! 13mo
CoffeeK8 This sounds fascinating! 13mo
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Augustdana
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“This is also a song by Iron Maiden.” Loving this chapter on the history of numbering houses, and in particular Vienna Austria as a way to tax, conscript, and imprison people.

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Augustdana
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This book is so endlessly fascinating. I‘m 16% in, and I‘ve been totally hooked from chapter one.

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Well-ReadNeck
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Pickpick

I love a micro-history. What an entertaining and educational volume on addresses. From why it‘s important to have a street address, to how roads are named and the political and cultural and implications of addresses. #netgalley #arc

Itchyfeetreader This is the kind of thing I‘d find fascinating. Stacking 2y
janeycanuck This is the book I didn‘t know I needed in my life. (edited) 2y
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HillsAndHamletsBookshop
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Pickpick

Deirdre Mask‘s The Address Book is a smart and satisfying work of pop history, sociology, and cultural geography. It explores both the past of how addresses were invented and the future ways this may be changing. It is entertaining without sacrificing scholarly rigor. A good read for fans of intelligently quirky, curiously specific histories like those of Mary Roach or Bill Bryson.

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