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erin.yarbrough

erin.yarbrough

Joined January 2018

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erin.yarbrough
The House in the Night | Susan Marie Swanson, Beth Krommes
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The House in the Night is based off of a nursery rhyme involving how everything is connected to a key, a home, and the light. The line and color used in this TL book is so beautiful, it won a Caldecott. This book would make a beautiful, short RA, as well as a S, SR, GR, or PR for younger grades. #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough This book would be great for understanding patterns and symbols in short readings (2.3 and 1.3). For an ELL, the font is large and the words are short, so this would be great for a beginner English learner (#27). 2y
erin.yarbrough https://www.eslkidstuff.com/lesson-plans/pdf/rooms-of-a-house-lesson-plan.pdf Here‘s a lesson plan for ESE students using these UDL principles! 2y
JenniferMc This looks interesting! I‘d love to read this. I love the illustrations. 2y
DrSpalding Beautiful image. Excellent choice. Nice EL/UDL ALIGNMENT. 2y
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erin.yarbrough
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I promise this is my last Dr. Seuss book! I had to share this one because I‘ve never heard of it before. This F book discusses how fear happens in a way that children can understand, and how they can learn to overcome it. This would make a great RT to reenact how to handle fear. It would also make a good RA, S, AS, or IR. #UCFLAE3414

erin.yarbrough http://readingtokids.org/Books/BookView.php?bookID=00001078 Here is a great lesson plan for younger students involving the concept of fear. It even has a craft! For UDLs, the plan covers vocabulary as well as facilitate coping skills through discussing how to handle fear (2.1 and 9.2). For an ELL learner, this requires high-level thinking while linking the lesson to students prior feelings. Every has felt scared, and that‘s okay (#4, #3, and #36)! 2y
SadiqaH Dr Seuss book is always an important part of class room library and great for young readers 2y
3 likes2 comments
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erin.yarbrough
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This Caldecott winner is a Pueblo Indian TL retold by using beautiful shapes and colors that represent the art style used in Pueblo culture. This would be great for a “cultures of America” unit using TL. As a RA, RT, IR, SR, or GR, this book would be a great addition for a bright and diverse classroom library. #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com/2009/04/scholastic-gui... Here‘s a lesson plan that links the book to Pueblo-Indian culture. For a UDL learner, these connections vary the demands of a student since it is most likely outside their cultural upbringing. It also helps to shed light on a culture that is new to them (7.2 and 8.2). 2y
erin.yarbrough For an ELL learner, this book is short, so the ELL would be able to focus on reading the text for accuracy and pronunciation (#34). 2y
JenniferMc I love the idea of promoting diversity in the classroom. Looking forward to adding this to my classroom library. 2y
3 likes3 comments
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erin.yarbrough
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This is a childhood favorite that I rediscovered in the Dr. Seuss section of the library! This F book would be great for an adjective lesson! I found one here! https://study.com/academy/lesson/if-i-ran-the-circus-lesson-plan.html This plan incorporates a RA, a IR, but it could also be a LC, SR, or a PR. #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough This lesson plan involves great ELL strategies, like partner work, drawing to display ideas, and learning higher-level adjectives (#2, #4, #10, #15, etc). These also work as UDL principles, such as clarifying vocabulary, highlighting critical features, and fostering collaboration (2.1, 3.2, and 8.3). 2y
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erin.yarbrough
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Although this F/NF book was not written by Dr. Seuss. Bonnie Worth adopts the character Cat in the Hat to teach students about what dinosaurs are, how to pronounce some names, and the primary characteristics of each one. This book would be great for a lower-elementary science unit as a RA, SR, RT, IR, or GR. #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough This book would be great for building fluency in science words while clarifying vocabulary. There‘s even a glossary in the back (2.1 and 5.3)! This technical vocabulary will also help ESOL students while teaching language and content (#5 and #12). 2y
erin.yarbrough http://www.seussville.com/activities/CITHLL%20Kit%20-%20activity%20guide%20revis... Here is an amazing lesson plan that covers so many of these books, including the one I‘m posting on. 2y
3 likes2 comments
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erin.yarbrough
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This delicious F book is about a small town where food comes from the sky, not from a store. I remember seeing the movie as a kid, but I completely forgot it was a book! This would make a hilarious addition to a nutrition unit as a RA, IR, RT, PR, or even a difficult S. #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough http://www.atozteacherstuff.com/Themes/Cloudy_With_A_Chance_of_Meatballs/index.s... Here is an entire list of lesson plans to choose from whether you want to use this book in a weather unit, a nutrition unit, or an environmental unit. By using this book for more than one unit/context, you vary the demands of the students by having them think about one book in multiple different ways (8.2, 7.1). 2y
erin.yarbrough For ELL learners, the overlap and reinforce key ideas repeatedly as well as link new ideas about the book to prior knowledge of the story (#4 and #15). 2y
3 likes2 comments
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erin.yarbrough
The Polar Express | Chris Van Allsburg
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This festive F book tells the story of a young boy never stopped believing in Santa Clause, thanks to the magical Polar Express. The picture in this book are gorgeous, and I could stare at every soft detail for hours. This book would make a great S, RA, RT, DR, or IR. Although books are mainly used for educational purposes, I think this one would be a great read aloud at a holiday party for pure enjoyment.

erin.yarbrough http://www.houghtonmifflinbooks.com/features/thepolarexpress/tg/polar.shtml Here‘s a lesson plan for some fun activities that could be done at said holiday party that are also educational. For UDLs, things like making a train with tickets would help offer visuals and hands-on activities to better connect to the book (1.3, 5.2). For an ELL, this would promote cooperation and following directions (#2 and #18). 2y
Fiona_i This is one of my favorite books and movie. This is such an awesome book I think I have read it over 20 times. 2y
4 likes2 comments
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erin.yarbrough
Black and White | David Macaulay
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This RF book is incredible, and it‘s hard to describe. Is it four different stories, or is it one story? I have no clue! But it uses four different art styles that beautifully contrast each other, so it‘s no wonder it won the Caldecott! It is anything but black and white! This book would make a great RA, S, SR, CR, or PR. This book would be great to teach children how to read together, and to see stories from different angles.

erin.yarbrough https://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/ojs/index.php/tlg/article/view/221/219 Here is a great explanation of the story! Using this, it would be fun to sequence each individual story on a white board. Then put them together in order of what the bigger story could be! It would be a great visual for ELLs (#7 and #9) as well as UDLs (1.1, 3.3, and 6.3). #UCFLAE3414SP18 2y
2 likes1 comment
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erin.yarbrough
The One and Only Ivan | Katherine Applegate
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This Newbery award-winning animal F book is beautiful and eye-opening. I finished the entire book in three days because I could not put it down. This book opens up so many great conversations about animal cruelty, love and abuse, and how far people (and animals) will go to get what they want. This books would make the perfect RA or LC, but also an AS, DR, or RT. #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough https://www.novelstudies.org/downloads/The_One_and_Only_Ivan_Novel_Study_Preview... Here is an amazing packet filled with questions and worksheets to guide students through the book. The worksheet clarifies vocabulary, asks higher-order thinking questions, and sets up tables and diagrams so students can better understand the book (1.1, 4.1, 5.3, and #9). 2y
LisaMart @erin.yarbrough Loved this book!! If you haven‘t looked up the real Ivan go to my post on this book and click on the YouTube video link I included. It will make you so sad! 🙁 (edited) 2y
JenniferMc I love this book so much! I cried at the end. I love the idea that they are making this into a movie. 2y
3 likes3 comments
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erin.yarbrough
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This picture is the tiniest little illustration on the page, but it shows all the great hidden lessons throughout this book. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat is a quick-read RF about a man who makes something new out of his overcoat. What I love most about this book is the little cut-outs in the pages that reuses the previous page to make his new article of clothing! This book would make a great read-aloud for K-2nd grade.

erin.yarbrough The book would also make a quick S, RT, IR, or PR. https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plans/teaching-content/joseph-had-lit... Here‘s an adorable lesson plan discussing the moral of the story and making a cause and effect chart for K-2nd grade. This activity would guide goal-setting through understanding how Joseph reached his final creation (6.1). It also teaches students to document information (6.3). 2y
erin.yarbrough Making the chart also follows ESOL strategy of teaching note-taking skills and using graphic organizers (#7 and #8). Did I mention it‘s a Caldecott winner? It deserves the award from its unique pictures to the important moral of the story. #UCFLAE3414SP18 2y
Jeffersleighann I would love to add this to my classroom library. It seems to have a lot of meaning and lessons that students can learn. 2y
2 likes3 comments
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erin.yarbrough
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This Dr.Seuss classic has been a favorite of mine (the ride at Islands of Adventure is awesome too!). It discusses topics of social status, profiting off of insecurities, and acceptance without the reader even realizing it. As a RA, teachers can discuss these important topics, but the book would also make a great S (hint hint), AS, RT, or IR. #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough The F book has several read alouds, but this one is my favorite! https://youtu.be/gV-BXH1Mdng A read aloud is a UDL tool that helps level reading for ELLs and ESE students and also helps build fluency (5.3). It also provides visualization for words that ELLs may have trouble understanding on their own (3.3). All these benefits of read alouds also correspond with adding visuals for support and allowing the student to work at their own pace. 2y
Jeffersleighann I always really loved how Dr. Suess incorporated hidden meanings in his books. For a lesson in high school we went through Dr. Suess books and tried to related them to an event we were learning about and what his stance was on it. 2y
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erin.yarbrough
Cinderella | Marcia Brown
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This sounds ridiculous, but I completely forgot that public libraries exist up until recently. I had a wonderful time looking through old Caldecott winners and found this hidden gem! This TL classic is written for 4th-6th graders, and I love finding picture books for the older grades. 11 year olds still love pictures! It retells the story of Cinderella, but the illustrations are created only with pen and crayons! #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough This book would make the perfect RA, but also a S, an SR for a TL unit, an adorable RT, or an IR for comprehensive reading. https://www.learningtogive.org/units/cinderella-stories/cinderella Here‘s a great lesson plan for a fairytale unit that compares and contrasts different versions of Cinderella! This would allow for contrasting different forms of media to share the same story, which satisfies UDL principles 1.2 and 1.3. 2y
erin.yarbrough This would also offer a variety of materials for comprehending the story for ELLs (#29) 2y
Jeffersleighann I feel like this would be a great independent read for a student that loves to draw and is interested in art. I feel like they could relate to this book and maybe be inspired artistically. 2y
1 like3 comments
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erin.yarbrough
A Wrinkle in Time | Madeleine L'Engle
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This SF book follows the story of a misfit girl, her genius little brother, and their new friend on a journey to save the universe and to find her father. Although this book is choppy and a little slow for me, I think this would be a great book for 3-5 grade. It‘s a Newberry winner, after all! This would be a great RA or LC, but also an AS, IR, or SR. #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough https://www.madeleinelengle.com/for-educators/wrinkle-in-time-teacher-resources/ Here is a link to L‘Engles‘ website with a ton of lesson plans, including a video demonstration of how Tessering works! Students could try to figure it out themselves in groups and demonstrate it before seeing the video, which would show ESOL strategies 10 and 17. It would also use UDL principles 3.2, 6.3, and 8.3. 2y
2 likes1 comment
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erin.yarbrough
Frederick | Leo Lionni
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I read this animal F book as a brain break from studying, and it conveys a deep message that even younger kids could understand. The book follows a short story of five mice who are preparing for winter. While the four mice work to supply food, the fifth one prepares for the cold months. in a way that no one expected. It carries the message that it takes more than food and shelter to survive: it takes a creative spirit too! #UCFLAE3414SP18

erin.yarbrough This Caldecott honor winner would be great as a S or a RT due to its short, yet impactful story. It would also be great for a RA, IR, or SR for K-2. Here‘s some freebies for a great lesson plan! https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/blog-posts/meghan-everette/frederick-freebie... 2y
erin.yarbrough By using an RT, 1.1-1.3 create alternative ways of understanding the book. This keeps students engaged with the story, and it only takes 5 students to reenact. Putting students in a group also uses #32 and #48 for ESOL students. Thank you again Dr. Spalding for such a great book! 2y
LisaMart Your post sounds like it would make for a great storytelling book! I‘ve never read any Leo Lionni books; I definitely need to change that! I like your resource too! Scholastic always has great stuff! 2y
DrSpalding Scholastic is a quality resource! My pleasure! I agree with Lisa that this would be a wonderful storytelling. It is technically a fable which falls under traditional literature. 2y
DrSpalding 💜brain breaks 2y
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erin.yarbrough
Out of My Mind | Sharon M. Draper
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This book is extremely eye-opening for anyone and especially a future teacher. It follows the life of 5th-grader Melody through her life of having Cerebral Palsy. She cannot walk, eat, nor talk on her own. She overcomes these struggles through the support of her family, neighbor, and her own willpower. By the last 5 chapters, I threw the book, cried in shock, and screamed “(insert bad word here) YEAH.” This one is absolutely worth every page.

WendyV Wow this book sounds intense! Is this a book you read for pleasure or would you use this in your future classroom? Your post has me very intrigued! 🤔 2y
Jeffersleighann I really like your description of the book it makes me want to pick it up and read it! How do you plan on integrating this book into the classroom? I think this would be a great literature circle book (: 2y
erin.yarbrough It‘s intense at times, but the main character is the perfect combo of sass and light-heartedness. I would recommend this book for 5-6th grade and higher, and I think it would be great to teach children about how people‘s words affect other people. 2y
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JenniferMc Your review definitely makes me want to read it! Would you use this in your lesson plans? It sounds intense but might be great to teach empathy. 2y
DrSpalding I felt the passion in your summary! I too cried and felt very angry reading this book. I believe it should be read by all teachers. Spread the word! 2y
DrSpalding Be sure to use the rubric and include all necessary elements. 2y
erin.yarbrough https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/blog-posts/kriscia-cabral/teaching-out-my-mi... Scholastic included an entire lesson plan on their website. For an ESOL learner, #32 would be best since the plan is writing intensive, and working in a group would make it easier to formulate ideas in English. For a UDL, 7.2 would allow students to reflect on whether or not Melody‘s struggle is relevant in today‘s society. 8.3 would also correlate with #32. 2y
erin.yarbrough This book would make a great LC along with an IR, a GR, an SR, or an RA. No matter how, just read this book! 2y
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erin.yarbrough
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This Caldecott winner is a mix of HF and B. I ADORE this book for both its story and for how Petit is portrayed as a humble, courageous, free character. The Man Who Walked Between the Towers would make a great S, RA, RT, DR, or PR. http://www.plymouth.edu/eportfolio/artefact/file/download.php?file=86467&view=19.... This lesson plan helps students dissect the importance of the story, and it helps them take valuable notes on content.

erin.yarbrough The lesson plan would work well for ESOL students through encouraging the use of diagrams and drawings as aid to identify concepts (#30). This is also a UDL strategy of offering ways of customizing the display of information (1.1). 2y
DrSpalding I enjoyed your summary. He was humble and courageous… Or I should say is. Nice alignment and obviously this book can be used for both literary and social studies lessons. 2y
5 likes3 comments
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erin.yarbrough
Palace of Mirrors | Margaret Peterson Haddix
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A F novel written by Margaret Peterson Haddix tells the story of a long-lost princess living the life of a commoner after her parents are killed by evil forces. A decoy is currently on the throne until she is old enough to return to her kingdom and the evil threat is neutralized. However, when she decides to take the throne back for herself, she encounters one of the biggest plot twist I have ever read.

erin.yarbrough This books is perfect for an AS since Haddix has written other 5th grade-level books. However, it could be also used in a DR, a S, RT, or LC. The chapters could easily be reenacted which would make this great in an active classroom. https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/books/palace-of-mirrors-by-margaret-peterson... 2y
erin.yarbrough For an ELL, the organization of the chapters are very neat and easy to follow, so marking up the book to show introductions and transitions is easy to do (#17). For UDL, this method of in-book annotation could be used to enhance capacity for monitoring progress and guide information processing (6.4 and 3.3). #UCFLAE3414SP18 2y
DrSpalding Impressive Erin. I added this to my stack. I have read all of her shadow children series but have not read this one. Nice summary. You enticed me to want to read the book.🙂 2y
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erin.yarbrough
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Island of the Blue Dolphins is an astonishing, eye-opening RF about a young woman who‘s tribe is taken to the new land in the east while her and her brother is left on their home island of Ghalas-at. To survive, she takes on the jobs of the men, which she wasn‘t allowed to do before, and continues to call the island her home. However, after a series of events, she experiences loss, friendship, and catastrophe like nothing else she‘s seen before.

erin.yarbrough This Newbery award winner is great for LCs due to its vocabulary and analytical potential. When I read it in school, it was both a RA and an IR, and some great discussions were done on how she felt during her entire experience and what drove her after the loss she experienced. A GR and a SR would also work for this novel. 2y
erin.yarbrough http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/examining-island-... |. In this lesson plan, it includes using the novel as a DR to help ELLs understand the struggles the main character went through as well. This books is also a great opportunity to teach ELLs note-taking strategies, such as timelines and T charts, since the events of the book are distinct (#17 and #9). #UCFLAE3414SP18 (edited) 2y
erin.yarbrough A ULD strategy would be to clarify the symbols throughout the book, and how she used them to support the meaning of survival in her story. Making a timeline would also help with ULD since it promotes organization and note taking (2.1, 3.3, and 6.3). (edited) 2y
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DrSpalding Minor errors, UDL… you may have read this previously but it is an excellent choice for historical fiction. This author is the reason why we have the Scott O‘Dell award for historical fiction. 2y
DrSpalding Timelines are excellent to enhance chronology! 2y
DivaDiane I wish I knew what all the acronyms mean. 2y
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erin.yarbrough
Tuck Everlasting (Special) | Natalie Babbitt
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This TL novel tells the story of Winnie Foster, a young girl in the 1880s, who comes across the Tuck family with a dark secret. They become incredibly close and they take her in as their own. After learning that the family accidentally drank from the fountain of youth many years ago, she must decide if she should do the same in order to stay with her dear friends.

erin.yarbrough This book would best benefit as a LC due to the inferences made by the reader about several characters feelings and actions throughout the story, but it could also be used as a RA, IR, SR, PR, or DR due to the higher-level vocabulary and dynamic viewpoints from the characters in the book. This book would be great in a social studies lesson for 5th grade since Mayan culture is discussed. Comparing their fountain of youth to Babbitt‘s would be great 2y
erin.yarbrough An EL strategy to use is to show the movie as well as read the book so the ELL can understand what is happening throughout the book visually instead of verbally. (#17) A UDL strategy would be to activate background knowledge by talking about stories of the fountain of youth and by beginning each book lesson with a class discussion or refresher of last chapter. (3.1, 2.1) #UCFLAE3414SP18 (edited) 2y
DrSpalding Wow Erin! This is a true favorite of mine. Literature circles along with the other strategies mentioned are perfect for this book. It is so versatile and truly does elicit conversation. When my children read this in elementary school, the teacher asked, would you want to live forever? After reading the text, their opinions changed a lot! Excellent post that includes all the necessary elements! Wonderful web resource! 2y
LisaMart @erin.yarbrough I had a flashback when I saw the picture of this book in your post! I remember reading this book in school! It feels like forever ago! I forgot how great this book is! And, please tell me, there is a movie on this book also, right? I seem to remember watching the movie... 🤔 2y
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erin.yarbrough
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“Finally” is a RF book that can be used as an RA, LC, IR, GR, or PR in any classroom. The book follows the life of a girl who‘s ready to turn twelve. She can get her ears pierced, wear makeup, go to the mall with her friends without her parents, and so much more. It shares her experiences with what feels like starting the rest of her life, and not all of them are what she imagined. The books is lighthearted, fun, and perfect for 4-6th grade.

erin.yarbrough A ULD (5.3, 3.2, 8.3) is to have students break up into groups of 3-4 and pick a scene or experience from the book. The students will reenact the scene as a review of significant events and plot. An EL can use an audiobook to slowly follow along in his/her book while having it read aloud. (#29) Also, here is a book trailer made by a student that lists several of the experiences Rory has had throughout the story. https://youtu.be/OuBGV8XFcRw (edited) 2y
Ryanne.H This seems like such a cute book! Definitely something I could have related to when I was 12. Great job 😊 2y
DrSpalding I had the pleasure of meeting Wendy Mass when the first book in the series was a Sunshine State Young Reader Award selection. I agree, it is a quality coming of age story that many children can relate to. Be sure to use the UDL & EL resources provided and include the number and verbiage in your post. 2y
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