Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
UnabridgedPod

UnabridgedPod

Joined June 2017

Teachers Take on Books
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

My twelve-year-old son and I have thoroughly enjoyed working our way through Stuart Gibbs's Spy School books together. Typically, he devours the book the day it arrives, and then I read it aloud to him (slowly!). Spy School: British Invasion includes all the elements we've loved in the whole series: dry wit, familiar and flawed characters who are coming of age, and an action-packed plot with plenty of twists. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Watching our hapless protagonist make up for his inadequecies as a fighter with math makes us endlessly happy, and the love triangle in this one adds a new facet to the middle school-appropriate moments of romance in the series as a whole. Excellent read! 11h
15 likes1 comment
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Mehso-so

Laura Lippman's Lady in the Lake was a three-and-a-half star read for me. (It's my second book by Lippman, after I was absolutely wowed by Sunburn.) The novel focuses on Maddie, a white woman who has just left her wealthy husband and teenage son. The book also centers, to a lesser extent (as far as presence on the page goes), on Cleo, a black woman who narrates her own story after her murder. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod The women's stories become intertwined by their neighborhood, by their beauty, and by their attraction to danger and risk. Lippman threads an array of voices through the women's stories, offering tiny, compelling micro-autobiographies that reveal the lives of the people Maddie meets. ⬇️ 1d
UnabridgedPod I found the entirety of the novel to be mildly intriguing, but it didn't quite connect--I found it all too easy to put this one down. I felt, in general, that the book paled in comparison to the beautifully noirish tone and captivating story Lippman told in Sunburn. Overall, an okay read. 1d
15 likes2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
The Library Book | Susan Orlean
post image
Pickpick

"The library is a whispering post. You don't need to take a book off a shelf to know there is a voice inside that is waiting to speak to you, and behind that was someone who truly believed that if he or she spoke, someone would listen. It was that affirmation that always amazed me. . . .” (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod All the things that are wrong in the world seem conquered by a library's simple unspoken promise: Here I am, please tell me your story; here is my story, please listen" (309-310). Susan Orlean's The Library Book is a fascinating nonfiction account of the 1986 fire that took out the Central Library of Los Angeles AND an exploration of the history of libraries in Los Angeles as a way into a consideration of the role of libraries more general.(cont.) 3d
UnabridgedPod I moved between reading and listening on Scribd for this one (Susan Orlean reads her own work), and I enjoyed both formats. This is a book club read for me, and I'm sure we'll have lots to talk about! 3d
20 likes2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
Star-Crossed | Minnie Darke
post image
Mehso-so

I really wish I liked this book more. There are some great things about Minnie Darke's Star-Crossed, but I couldn't get past the premise, which relies SO heavily on coincidence and on a series of bad decisions that seemed out of character for the protagonist. I also felt the book could have been so much shorter. Tightening it up may have made me more patient with its development. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod The conventions at its center are particular weak spots for me, so I definitely went into this the wrong way . . . I'm thinking (based on bookstagram buzz) that it has found its right readers.⠀

On the other hand, how cute is my dog!?!
3d
Soubhiville Very cute! 3d
15 likes2 comments
blurb
UnabridgedPod
post image

We're here this week with another analysis of a book-to-film adaptation. We're taking on the fabulous Netflix movie To All the Boys I've Loved Before, based on Jenny Han's source material. Did you watch the movie? Take a listen, and then let us know what you think!

review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

I have some regrets about choosing to listen to Toni Morrison's The Source of Self-Regard, mainly because I'm a much stronger reader than I am listener when it comes to books. I know that I got about *thismuch* of the depth of Morrison's thoughts through this selection of essays. I know, however, that it would have been a looong time before I'd gotten to this one, and so I'm grateful for Scribd (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod which let me enjoy Morrison's assessment of our society, her analysis of her own works, and her consideration of a variety of other important figures, both literary and not. My favorite parts were her discussions about her own authorial decisions. ⬇️ 5d
UnabridgedPod Sometimes, those were about her choice of topic; at other times, she focused on a choice of words. In all cases, I found Morrison's work to be so thought provoking and brilliant . . . and I want desperately to re-read her novels. It's been a while.⠀

How often does format make a difference in your appreciation for or understanding of a book?
5d
13 likes2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
The Dragon Republic | R. F. Kuang
This post contains spoilers
show me
post image
Pickpick

R. F. Kuang's The Dragon Republic, the second novel in The Poppy War series, is an amazing, epic fantasy novel. Rin, trying to move on from the tragic events at the end of The Poppy War and to seek vengeance against the The Empress, remains at the center of this novel. Her great physical strength and her power mask extreme emotional vulnerability, a fragility she hides by walling off her deepest feelings. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Serving as the leader of the Cike, a group of god-powered friends, Rin wrestles with questions of morality, confronts the single mindedness of religious fervor and the horrible prejudice of cultural and ethnic blindness from a new race. Kuang once again builds a believable, strong character who must work through her grief and her weaknes to make a difference not only for herself but for her entire society. ⬇️ 6d
UnabridgedPod Her attempts to take the right path are often met with failure, but her tenacity never lets up. I was reminded of one of the brilliant rivalry between Game of Thrones' Cersei Lannister and Arya Stark, in which each character is complex and compelling. I cannot recommend this series enough. 6d
1 like2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
Pumpkinheads | Rainbow Rowell
post image
Pickpick

I was so happy to see Rainbow Rowell and Faith Erin Hicks talking about Pumpkinheads with Linda Holmes at the National Book Festival this fall. They discussed the fabulousness that is Deja, the appealingly pathetic nature of Josiah, the grandeur of the Nebraska pumpkin patch, and their back-and-forth writing process . . . including the goat.(continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Pumpkinheads features all of the great elements of any Rainbow Rowell novel, including a real and delightful friendship, paired with the gorgeous and evocative art of Faith Erin Hicks. A delight of a graphic novel. 1w
17 likes1 comment
review
UnabridgedPod
Defy Me | Tahereh Mafi
post image
Mehso-so

The 5th novel in the Shatter Me series has some high ratings on Goodreads. For me, it was . . . fine. I do enjoy the way Juliette and Warner's relationship has developed. Their discoveries about their shared history are interesting. I just feel as if the novel is a but static. Because it reflects its setting and circumstances, the book is quite interior. Solid novel, but one that's setting the stage for the culminating book in the series.

review
UnabridgedPod
To Night Owl From Dogfish | Meg Wolitzer, Holly Goldberg Sloan
post image
Pickpick

I absolutely loved To Night Owl from Dogfish, an epistolary, middle-grade novel from Holly Goldberg Sloan and Meg Wolitzer. Told entirely through emails and letters, the book is about the friendship between Averly and Bett. When their fathers' romance culminates in a plot to make the girls friends by sending them to the CIGI camp for the summer. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod When the girls uncover the plot, a flurry of emails begin, and the girls team up in an attempt to defy their fathers' plans. The unexpected, of course, ensues. Sloan and Wolitzer broaden the girls' correspondence with accents from their dads, Bett's grandma Gaga, Avery's biological mother, and a sprinkling of other characters. ⬇️ 1w
UnabridgedPod We come to understand Avery's anxiety, Bett's commitment to adventure, and the ways that relationships can rise and fall. Gorgeous, resonant, and emotional novel. 1w
16 likes1 stack add2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Re-reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is . . . amazing. I won't say that the book is perfect (Hermione's whole S.P.E.W. subplot is *not* my favorite), but it is just brilliant. (I'm not sure that spoilers are still necessary for any Harry Potter book, but just in case, there are spoilers ahead!) Shout out to my kiddo for setting the scene in the image. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod (Yes, it's a bit of a muddle of Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts Legos, but I'll take it.)⠀ I think one of the most brilliant things about the novel is the way that Rowlling develops Cedric's characters. I was absolutely brokenhearted in a way I didn't expect when Cedric dies. It's because she has developed him *just* enough. He's not a major character, but Harry recognizes a basic decency in him ⬇️ 1w
UnabridgedPod that means Harry's desolation at his death is all th emore moving. He's devastated because he finally sees that Voldemort's insidiousness is in working against anything good and decent. Harry's relationship with Cedric isn't overly personal, but he takes very personally Voldemort's actions against decency, against what I'd call humanity even in this world about those who are supposed to be more than human. ⬇️ 1w
UnabridgedPod Cedric's death has an impact because Voldemort sees him as just one more object alongside all those he uses and kills. ⠀

As far as our re-watch of the film goes, I know I sound like a broken record, but the movie, while wonderful, just doesn't have the complexity or nuance of the novel. Alan Rickman's Severus Snape is *always* my favorite, and I think the actors in general are wonderful. ⬇️
1w
UnabridgedPod The compression of the main plot, while of course necessary for any kind of realistic runtime, becomes more problematic for me with each re-read. I was affected so much again, though, by Cedric's death, and I think Pattinson's performance hits all the right notes. 1w
32 likes1 stack add4 comments
blurb
UnabridgedPod
With the Fire on High | Elizabeth Acevedo
post image

Join us for our discussion about the Unabridged Book Club pick for September, Elizabeth Acevedo's With the Fire on High. You can listen to our new episode and the participate in social media discussions throughout the month. We'd love to know what you think!

review
UnabridgedPod
The Whisper Man | Alex North
post image
Pickpick

I finished this Book of the Month pick in record time, encouraged by all of the Bookstagram buzz about just. how. creepy it is. And I really loved Alex North's The Whisper Man, though I wasn't *quite* as creeped out as I'd hoped/feared. Though it migrates between a variety of perspectives, at the center of the novel are Tom and Jake Kennedy, a father and son who are mourning the unexpected death of their wife and mother. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod They move to Featherbank for a fresh start, unaware of the sinister history of the town. Frank Carter, the Whisper Man, is imprisoned after a brutal series of child murders in which he lured the children outside their homes by whispering at their windows. Pete Willis, the police officer who arrested Carter, is called into a new case that mimics Carter's murders. ⬇️ 2w
UnabridgedPod The novel weaves through past and present, the perspectives of adults and of children, and the possibility of ghosts, circling the origins and aftermath of Carter's crimes.
While I was entranced by the novel, which is beautifully written and reminiscent, for me, of the patient build of Stephen King's novels, The Whisper Man did not end up being one of those books that made me scared to be at home alone. ⬇️
2w
UnabridgedPod Instead, I enjoyed North's understanding of his characters, his willingness to embrace a sort of magical realism in its paranormal sections, and his instincts in building an absorbing plot through the assembly of diverse perspectives. For me, it didn't live up to the hype . . . and I was glad. 2w
23 likes1 stack add3 comments
blurb
UnabridgedPod
National Book Festival | Library of Congress, Laura Welch Bush
post image

The National Book Festival is one of my favorite events every year. By pure chance, it falls on a weekend that's near my birthday, and so my mother's gift is always a weekend of babysitting services (yes, she's amazing!). This event, put on by the Library of Congress, is FREE for the public. (Yes, it's free!!!!!!) If you've never been, you MUST put this on your calendar for next year--August 29, 2020. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod This year, I was looking forward to seeing RBG, but her line formed at dawn, so we missed that one (over 5000 people attended!). @kirkmoyers and I were fortunate, though, to see these amazing authors. I'll be talking more about the day on an upcoming bonus episode of @unabridgedpod, so stay tuned. ⬇️ 2w
UnabridgedPod Pictured here, in rows from left to right are (row 1) Rebecca Makkai (The Great Believers); a panel with Valeria Luiselli (Lost Children Archive), Aminatta Forna, and R. O. Kwon (The Incendiaries); Madeline Miller (Song of Achilles and Circe); (row 2) panel with moderator Lee Ann Potter, Misa Sugiura (This Time Will Be Different), Mitali Perkins (Forward Me Back to You); Kirk and me and our Unabridged t-shirts; ⬇️ 2w
UnabridgedPod panel with Alberto Manguel (Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey: A Biography), Emily Wilson (new translation of The Odyssey), and Madeline Miller again; (row 3) Natasha Trethewey (Monument: Poems New and Selected); Jenny Xie (Eye Level: Poems); David McCullough (The Pioneers) and moderator Marie Arana; Sigrid Nunez (The Friend); (row 4) Beth Macy (Dopesick); ⬇️ 2w
UnabridgedPod line for the final session of the day about The Odyssey; panel with Rainbow Rowell and Faith Erin Hicks (Pumpkinheads) and Linda Holmes, moderator (Evvie Drake Starts Over). 2w
BarbaraBB Wow! 2w
11 likes5 comments
blurb
UnabridgedPod
post image

⭐️AUGUST WRAP-UP⭐️⠀

My reading in August was quite varied (um, random?), but I read some AMAZING books. And some that were just okay.⠀

Here are some stats: 27 books total ⭐️ 4 audiobooks ⭐️ 2 nonfiction ⭐️ 8 YA/Middle Grade⠀

Do you see any that you loved? What were your favorites in August?

review
UnabridgedPod
Inland | Ta Obreht
post image
Pickpick

Téa Obreht's Inland is a strange read for me. I really debated about my rating on Goodreads (huge problem, I know!), and I wish I had an option for 3.5 stars. There's a LOT to appreciate about this novel--the mining of an unusual part of American history, the beautiful incorporation of the magical in gritty reality, the slow revelation of the characters at its center. But the book also kind of dragged for me. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Through two separate stories that eventually intertwine, Obreht establishes two entirely different tones. One of the stories, however, felt repetitive to me, as if it were being spun out so it didn't outpace the other. I thought momentum built as the book progressed, and so the conclusion was REALLY lovely, but it took a great deal of patience and willing to go along with repetition to get there. ⬇️ 2w
UnabridgedPod That, unfortunately, sounds more negative than I mean it to--ultimately, I'm so glad that I stuck with it--but I don't think it's an unqualified success. 2w
TheAromaofBooks I really do feel like there should be a 3.5* option! 2w
See All 6 Comments
UnabridgedPod @TheAromaofBooks Yes! I‘m so often between 3 and 4. 2w
TheAromaofBooks On my blog I've created a 7-tiered system of 5 stars plus 3.5 and 4.5 haha 3.5 just feels like “it was better than average but still not a book I feel like I need to make everyone read“ and 4.5 is “IT WAS SO CLOSE TO PERFECT BUT NOT QUITE“ 2w
UnabridgedPod @TheAromaofBooks I love that!! I need alll the levels. 😂 2w
21 likes6 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

This is my first book by Lisa Lutz, and I will *definitely* be reading more. The Swallows is SUCH an excellent boarding school novel. It's fast paced, suspenseful, and horrifying. Alternating between multiple perspectives, the book leads the reader through the characters' discovery of an insidious plot perpetrated by The Ten, the top tier of students in each class. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Alex Witt, a new teacher, is one catalyst for a plot from both within and outside of The Ten to put an end to a practice (no spoilers here!) that is cruel and misogynistic. As I came to know the characters at the novel's center and to watch the push and pull of their relationships with each other, I was completely absorbed. ⬇️ 2w
UnabridgedPod I didn't completely love the ending--for me, it didn't quite live up to the beautiful build of tension in the rest of the book--but I absolutely adored the bulk of The Swallows. 2w
13 likes1 stack add2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
With the Fire on High | Elizabeth Acevedo
post image
Pickpick

Elizabeth Acevedo just blows me away. I read chapter one of With the Fire on High and thought, "This is nice, but I don't know how it will be able to compare to The Poet X." And then I read on . . . and didn't stop. Yep, this was a one-sitting read for me. Acevedo excels at building flawed, believable characters, and watching Emani fight to honor both her obligations to others-- (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod her daughter Emma, her 'Buela, her friend Angelica, and the new people who have come into her life--and to herself and her dreams is captivating. I cried more than once. I laughed. My heart ached, and at other times I felt giddy with joy. I cannot WAIT for this episode of Unabridged! 2w
16 likes1 comment
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

I saw a lot of buzz in Book of the Month discussion groups about American Predator, so when I saw it on Scribd I downloaded it right away. Wow, was that buzz right. Maureen Callahan's exploration of serial killer Israel Keyes is fascinating, chilling, and so well researched. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod This is a great listen on audio--narrator Amy Landon is excellent, distinguishing between characters with voices but maintaining the seriousness required for the topic. Excellent true crime listen! 2w
18 likes2 stack adds1 comment
review
UnabridgedPod
The Gifted School | Bruce Holsinger
post image
Pickpick

"Insidious, these false versions of superiority and ease we project onto other families: how often they blind us to the surer comforts of our own" (302).⠀

I absolutely adored Bruce Holsinger's The Gifted School, a gut-wrenching and powerful novel about the impact of exclusivity and competition on a Colorado community. At the center of the book are the families of four women: (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Rose, husband Gareth, and daughter Emma Q; Samantha, husband Kev, and daughter Emma Z (Emma Q's best friend); Lauren and her kids Tessa and Xavier; and Azra, her twins Charlie and Aidan, her ex-husband Beck, and his new family Sophia and baby Roy. The women have supported each other through tragedies and illnesses and deaths, and their children are friendly, if not all friends. ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod Their tight bond begins to break, however, when a new public school for the top 10% dominates the thoughts of the community. The book rotates through multiple perspectives--Rose, Emma Z, Tessa (through her vlog--the book includes some multi-genre elements throughout), Xavier, and Beck--as the children go through the multi-step admissions process, beginning with a rigorous standardized test. ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod Holsinger's writing is phenomenal, and the observations throughout are keen and thought provoking (and sometimes uncomfortable in what they reveal in the reader, at least in my experience!). He explores notions of white privilege, particularly in the periodic inclusion of the voice of Ch'ayña, the housekeeper for Rose and Samantha and grandmother of Atik, another candidate for the school; intelligence and talent; exclusivity; ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod ambition; competition; nature vs. nurture; and so many of the issues that consume my thoughts as a parent and a teacher. The novel reminded me at times of Liane Moriarty's Big Little Lies, though with less camp and less murder. It's a captivating page turner of a novel that offers both plot and idealism. 3w
18 likes4 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

I haven't read a book in a long time that swept me away in quite the way that Alexander Chee's How to Write an Autobiographical Novel. This essay collection (and while I love essay collections, I can't say they often sweep me away!) is absolutely gorgeous. And sad. And thoughtful. Chee can write--I mean, REALLY write--and the topics he's chosen balance perfectly big ideas with a narrow focus. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Here, he takes on elements of his own identity, including his race, his homosexuality, the early death of his father, the betrayal of his father's family. He also explores his writing--his decision to pursue writing academically, his moves across the country to support a writing career, teaching writing, and in the title essay, how--and why--he continues writing. ⬇️ (edited) 3w
UnabridgedPod For me, Chee's book will go alongside Stephen King's On Writing in considering the power of writing--and of reading--to bring about change.⠀

I would love--LOVE--to teach this book.⠀

Also, I know that the quotation in the image is too long, but I just couldn't resist. I wanted to quote the whole book.❤️
3w
UnabridgedPod Just caught the typo in the image. 😢 3w
10 likes3 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
Dear Evan Hansen: The Novel | Val Emmich, Steven Levenson, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul
post image
Pickpick

My husband and I will be seeing the musical Dear Evan Hansen at the Kennedy Center this Friday, and I am so excited! I was torn whether or not to read this novel, which is based on the play (usually, that's whole "based on the movie/screenplay" thing doesn't work out for me), but I was pleasantly surprised by this YA novel.⠀

Evan Hansen is a lonely teenager who, as part of his therapy, writes optimistic letters to himself each day. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod On the first day of school, his letter to himself--which begins "Dear Evan Hansen"--falls into the hands of another teenager with disastrous results. Soon, Evan has implicated himself in a series of lies, trapped by his feelings of obligation and guilt. ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod I don't want to reveal much more, but the novel (for me) grew stronger as it developed. Some initial plot moments strained credulity, but watching Evan's desperate attempts to find the right path was moving and thought provoking. Much better than expected. 3w
TrishB I‘m going to see it in November and my daughter has this book. I may have to read before seeing. 3w
UnabridgedPod @TrishB Yeah, I‘ll have to weigh in after we see it on whether I‘m glad I read it first. ❤️ 3w
21 likes4 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
Women Talking: A Novel | Miriam Toews
post image
Pickpick

Miriam Toew's Women Talking is so, so smart. It's based on the true story of a Mennonite community in Bolivia in which eight men drugged and raped women in their community over several years. (You can easily find out more via a simple Google search.) In this audiobook (I listened via @scribd, and Matthew Edison is an excellent narrator), (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod we are there for the aftermath of the revelation that these women weren't being visited by the devil each night, as some (male) community members claimed but were, instead, the victims of an insidious plot to take advantage of their innocence and ignorance. Initially, I was surprised that a male narrator would read a book called Women Talking, but that choice tells the story through the filter of a male member of the community. ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod He's an outsider, unimplicated in the assaults, who is asked to take minutes of the women's discussion. At the heart of the discussion is whether the women should do nothing, should stay in the community and fight, or should leave. They discuss blame, the obligation to forgive, the worth of obligated forgiveness, the value of knowledge and reading . . . ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod I could go on. It's only a six-hour audiobook, but it's so, so powerful and beautiful and painful. Absolute recommendation (definitely on audio, but I imagine it would be equally powerful as a text). 3w
Reggie I liked the in between moments she puts in there to break everything up, like how the sister will run her hands through her sister, Salome‘s hair when she‘s fired up, or how the boy will drive his invisible car around honking and shouting numbers. This is one of my favorites of the year. Great review! (edited) 3w
19 likes1 stack add4 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
The Most Fun We Ever Had | Claire Lombardo
post image
Pickpick

Oh, this book. Claire Lombardo's The Most Fun We Ever Had is a *tad* bit intimidating at 544 pages. (It's not that I don't read big books--I love them--but usually, they're fantasy. Or historical fiction. But a mostly-contemporary, family novel? Not necessarily calling out "big book" to me. That's fodder for another discussion.) (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Anyway, I adore this novel. I somehow both don't know that it *needed* to be over 500 pages AND feel as if every page is absolutely perfect. The observations about family and motherhood and married relationships and parenthood are so, so true. Marilyn and David are, from the outside, the perfect, invulnerable couple. They're the parents to four amazing and successful girls, and now grandparents to a selection of interesting grandsons. ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod But as Lombardo unveils their lives, alternating between the current lives of the two parents, four daughters, and one secret grandson(!) AND between the present and the past (beginning in the 1970s, when Marilyn and David first met), we come to KNOW these people. I found myself thinking about them, even dreaming about them, ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod because of the moments they are so exasperated with their children that they have to go to another room or love them so much they're moved to tears. These are relationships as I've *experienced* them (sorry for all of the asterisks and capital letters--it's a book that calls out for them), and they moved me to think and feel and keep on reading. I am totally on board for whatever Claire Lombardo writes next. 3w
See All 7 Comments
TheNerdyProfessor This one is on my TBR.. I love your review and will probably move it up in the queue 3w
LiteraryinLititz Great review! 3w
UnabridgedPod @TheNerdyProfessor Great! It‘s well worth it. ❤️📚 3w
22 likes1 stack add7 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
The Nickel Boys: A Novel | Colson Whitehead
post image
Pickpick

Colson Whitehead's The Nickel Boys is spare and heartwrenching and perfect. I'm a fan of Whitehead's gorgeous prose and ability to deftly move from genre to genre, but The Nickel Boys may be my favorite work of his yet. And yes, that includes his amazing The Underground Railroad. The book, at just over 200 pages, is tight and brilliantly structured, unfolding the story of Elwood Curtis, (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod a good, kind, responsible black teenager in the Jim Crow South who is wrongly sentenced to Nickel Academy. Whitehead resists an overly dramatic accounting of the horrors Curtis faces there in favor of an unsentimental detailing of the events both large and small that make it such a life altering place. ⬇️ 3w
UnabridgedPod The novel moves occasionally between Elwood's time at Nickel Academy in the 1960s and his current life in New York, as we see what has become of his youthful promise. It's not fair to give away anything about this novel. Instead, I'll just advise you to read it immediately. 3w
Leftcoastzen Great review! I‘m nearing the end , will probably be best novel I have read this year. 3w
UnabridgedPod @Leftcoastzen Thanks! ❤️ 3w
25 likes4 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

In book 7 of the Flavia de Luce series, Alan Bradley moves Flavia from her beloved home village and her ancestral home, Buckshaw, transplanting her to Miss Bodycote's Female Academy in Toronto, where she quickly is pulled into a new murder mystery. Again, in As Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust, Jane Entwistle is a brilliant narrator, imbuing each new character with a distinct voice. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Listening to Flavia learn to establish a persona in relation to a new setting and a new group of friends and adults is brilliant--her perfect balance of precocious brilliance and utter egotism is, as always, a joy. (I just love it when she lauds her "perfect sense of hearing." She really does hear everything. ?) Another brilliant mystery. Can't wait to listen to book 8 on Scribd! 3w
Freespirit Great review.. ❤️ 3w
UnabridgedPod @Freespirit Thanks!! ❤️ 3w
WanderingBookaneer I love Flavia! 3w
17 likes1 stack add5 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
Mera: Tidebreaker | Danielle Paige
post image
Pickpick

My boys and I are always up for (1) superhero stories (in text or film form!) and (2) good graphic novels. We've all three now enjoyed Danielle Paige's Mera: Tidebreaker, which offers a sort of origin story of Mera . . . totally aside from her depiction in the Aquaman movie (which is, I must admit, all I really knew about Mera AND Aquaman, aside from his appearances in Smallville).

12 likes1 stack add
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Soniah Kamal's Unmarriageable opens with protagonist Alys teaching a class of girls in Pakistan about a key phrase from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. From that moment, I loved this book. Kamal retells Austen's classic story, set in the early 2000s in Pakistan. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod In her essay "Pride and Prejudice and Me," she writes, "As I read and reread Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet and every other character ceased to be English--to me, they were Pakistani. . . . Ever since I could remember, I'd been engaging in literary transference/transplantation/translation from one culture to another. ⬇️ 4w
UnabridgedPod Growing up on English literature, I taught myself to see my daily reality reflected in my reading material, while plumbing its universal truths in search of particulars" (334-335). That layer of awareness pervades the novel, making each mirror of the original plot more resonant because of the characters' (and, particularly, Alys's) understanding of Austen's observations. ⬇️ 4w
UnabridgedPod Kamal is an excellent writer, and the plight of Alys and her family, of her reaction to Darsee and his friends, of the alternate excess and deficits of the families in the society is moving because of and beyond its source material. I've read a lot of excellent Austen rewrites recently, and this novel will join that collection without a doubt. 4w
20 likes2 stack adds3 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
Fleishman Is in Trouble: A Novel | Taffy Brodesser-Akner
post image
Pickpick

Taffy Brodesser-Akner's Fleishman Is in Trouble (thanks, Sara, for the loan!) is a thought-provoking, challenging, slippery book. Just a warning: to discuss this book, I'm going to talk about its whole arc. Also, sorry to do this, but I wrote a looong review over on Instagram (@ Jen.loves.books), so—one time only—visit me there for my full discussion. Overall, I recommend this one!! 📚

review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Sandhya Menon's third YA novel, There's Something about Sweetie, is a beautiful followup to her first (and my favorite!) When Dimple Met Rishi. This new book focuses on the relationship between Ashish (brother to Rishi from book 1) and Sweetie, a self-proclaimed fat athlete whose traditional South Asian mother constantly criticizes her weight. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Menon says, in her Author's Note, that she "wanted to write honest conversations between a fat Indian-American teen and her mother. [She] wanted to put the same messaging [she]--and so many others--got onto the page, and [she] wanted to have this strong, beautiful main character refute it on the page." Through the novel, those goals are obvious. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod There were times when I was taken out of the storyline because of the explicit passages addressing the stated issue. Ultimately, though, I loved this book and these characters. The novel alternates between the perspectives of Ashish and Sweetie, and each is endearingly sweet and vulnerable and true to the teenager she (and he) is. 1mo
JoyBlue I just stacked When Dimple Met Rishi. Thanks! 1mo
15 likes4 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
Carry On | Rainbow Rowell
post image
Pickpick

One of my goals for this summer was to re-read Rainbow Rowell's divine novel Carry On in anticipation of its sequel Wayward Son this September. Oh, I just cannot wait! Diving in to the book again reminded me of Fangirl (my favorite of Rowell's works, which I've read several times, and which is the "source" of the Carry On storyline), of Harry Potter (which I'm also re-reading!), and that Carry On is its own, distinct, perfect book. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod Romantic and funny and quirky, this novel gives us the story of Simon Snow, center of a "chosen one" prophesy and his mortal enemy--and roommate--Baz. Who is a magician. But also a vampire. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod Rowell's commentary on the conventions of this type of story, with the expected love triangle and a defiance of it, with the faithful and brilliant sidekick who is more than a sidekick, with the wise mentor who is more than a mentor . . . well, I just could not love it more. Rainbow Rowell reasserts herself as one of my absolute favorites every time I read (or re-read!) one of her books.⠀ 1mo
BlameJennyJane I‘m getting sucked into the Rowell vortex with your post. I loved Eleanor & Park so I got Fangirl, Carry On and Attachments. Do you recommend I read Fangirl then Carry On? I didn‘t know they were linked... or that a sequel is coming! I gotta catch up! 1mo
UnabridgedPod @BlameJennyJane While I do recommend that you read Fangirl first because it will add some context, I think you could begin with Carry On—it stands alone. ❤️ 1mo
BlameJennyJane Sweet. Thanks!! 1mo
26 likes2 stack adds5 comments
blurb
UnabridgedPod
With the Fire on High | Elizabeth Acevedo
post image

We hope you can join us in reading Elizabeth Acevedo's With the Fire on High, the Unabridged Book Club choice for September. We'll be discussing this novel on our September 4th episode. We all enjoyed her masterful first novel, The Poet X, and are eagerly anticipating her newest YA book!⠀

Here's the description from Goodreads: (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod "With her daughter to care for and her abuela to help support, high school senior Emoni Santiago has to make the tough decisions, and do what must be done. The one place she can let her responsibilities go is in the kitchen, where she adds a little something magical to everything she cooks, turning her food into straight-up goodness. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod Still, she knows she doesn‘t have enough time for her school‘s new culinary arts class, doesn‘t have the money for the class‘s trip to Spain — and shouldn‘t still be dreaming of someday working in a real kitchen. But even with all the rules she has for her life — and all the rules everyone expects her to play by — once Emoni starts cooking, her only real choice is to let her talent break free." ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod Check out our episode on September 4, and join us on social media for Saturday discussions throughout the month of September. 1mo
19 likes3 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
This post contains spoilers
show me
post image
Pickpick

Jayne Entwistle is the perfect reader in the audio version of Alan Bradley's The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches. Book 6 in the Flavia de Luce mystery series felt different for me from the beginning with its focus on the recovery of the body of Harriet's mother. At first, the novel doesn't feel like a mystery. Instead, it focuses on Flavia, her two sisters, and her father-- (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod along, of course, with the faithful Dogger and the well-established characters from her small town in England. As the book continues, though, we see both the aftermath of this pivotal event in the family AND Flavia's investigations into an array of related mysteries.⠀

As always, Flavia's voice is the star for me, and Entwistle is brilliant in her portrayal of the young girl AND of the distinct characters in her life. Moving, perfect novel.
1mo
2 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

THIS is where Harry Potter starts for me. It's the shift to a little more darkness, to Harry truly having to make some tough decisions, to him finding out what REALLY happened to his parents (those memories at the demontors' hands are so brutal and yet the only real memories he has of his parents in their last moments). (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod It's when Harry sees that truly bad things really can still happen in the wizarding world, when he moves past his escapes from Voldemort to realize that Buckbeak can be put to death, that the demontors can give the kiss to Sirius. Absolutely brilliant. 1mo
chaoticgoodhufflepuff This one‘s my favorite! ❤️ 1mo
JenlovesJT47 My fave!! 1mo
UnabridgedPod @JenlovesJT47 Love it! ❤️ 1mo
29 likes1 stack add5 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
Tiger Queen | Annie Sullivan
post image
Pickpick

Thanks to Partner NetGalley for the digital ARC of Annie Sullivan‘s Tiger Queen in exchange for an honest review. The book releases September 10, 2019.⠀

Annie Sullivan acknowledges the roots of her novel Tiger Queen in the book‘s epigraph in which she thanks her “middle school English teacher, Mrs. Desautels, for first asking the question, ‘The lady or the tiger?‘” As a fan of retellings of classic literature, I was hooked. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod I‘ve always loved the complexity of the original story, which offers up a princess who‘s barbaric enough that she may just send her lover to his death by tiger rather than see him in the arms of another woman. ⬇️ (edited) 1mo
UnabridgedPod Sullivan‘s young adult novel uses this story, Frank R. Stockton‘s “The Lady, or the Tiger?,” as a springboard for a story about class division, corruption, and power. At the novel‘s heart is the tiger queen, Kateri, the daughter of the powerful king who rules a small kingdom built on a formerly lush oasis. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod Now, the kingdom suffers because of a murderous drought that requires strict rationing of water for its citizens.⠀

Read the rest of my review at unabridgedpod.com/book-reviews.
1mo
12 likes3 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Roxanne Veletzos's The Girl They Left Behind gains strength as it builds. It's the story of a four-year-old girl who is left behind by her parents in World War II-era Romania. Natalia is then adopted by a wealthy, childless couple, Despina and Anton, who make her the center of their world. We watch Natalia come of age as Romania changes allegiance from Germany to the Allies and then moves toward the Communist government that takes over. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod Veletzos bases Natalia on her own mother, and the parts of the book taht were most compelling for me were (I learned at the end) the parts based on reality. I was less taken with some imagined occurrences, which strained credulity. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod 've written before about my "World War II novel fatigue," and this book (for the most part) escaped that exhaustion by revealing a specific story I hadn't read before. Ultimately, this was a solid read for me (and my book club), if not one that captured me from beginning to end. 1mo
18 likes2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
New Kid | Jerry Craft
post image
Pickpick

I love Jerry Craft's graphic novel New Kid. Protagonist Jordan enrolls--somewhat against his will--in a new, exclusive school and quickly learns that he is one of the only students of color and one of the few students who enroll because of financial assistance. Jordan works to find his place in the school, uncovering the ways that he is (and isn't!) truly different. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Through the school year, he navigates the prejudice and assumptions of teachers as much as those of peers. Craft does a beautiful job developing Jordan's point of view but also of revealing his parents' struggles with the decision to send him to this school. Excellent, middle-grade read (my twelve year old read and enjoyed this one before I did!). 1mo
21 likes1 comment
review
UnabridgedPod
Caleb and Kit | Beth Vrabel
post image
Pickpick

I absolutely adored Beth Vrabel's Caleb and Kit (thanks, @meaningfulmadness, for the loan!). Caleb is a twelve-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis who is dealing with (1) the perfection of his seventeen-year-old brother, (2) the aftermath of his parents' divorce, (3) having to attend a summer camp during the day, and (4) growing apart from his best friend Brad. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod His life follows a routine of doing what he has to do to stay healthy . . . and to please his family. And then he meets Kit. She is totally different from anyone else in his life, with her unfettered days and big imagination, and she is SO appealing to Caleb who sees a freedom in her life that he yearns for. But he soon learns that things are more complex than he thought. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod Caleb and Kit *totally* swept me up. I loved the characters, who are empathetic and complex, and the realistic depiction of these twelve year olds and the problems they're dealing with as best they can. Beautiful novel that I can't wait for my son to read! 1mo
14 likes2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Patrick Radden Keefe's Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland is a fascinating, horrifying account of The Troubles. While nominally focusing on the Disappearing of widowed mother-of-ten Jean McConville, the book broadens quickly into an investigation of the IRA's top operatives, ranging from the 1970s (and some history of what came before) to modern day. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod While I'd watched Michael Collins (about the 1920s IRA) and In the Name of the Father, my knowledge of this time period was minimal, so much of Keefe's book is a revelation. And I definitely wasn't aware of the more recent developments, particularly the publication of transcripts of interviews with members of the IRA that had been held--supposedly iron clad--by Boston College. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod This is the best type of historical narrative nonfiction: it's compelling and focused on the people behind the events. Absolutely brilliant. 1mo
16 likes2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Etaf Rum's A Woman Is No Man has been all over Bookstagram for a while now, and I can see why. Its story of three generations of Palestinian-American, Muslim women is compelling and alternately desolate and hopeful. Fareeda and her daughter-in-law Isra have both emigrated to America at different times; (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod Isra's daughter Deya is born into their home, struggling to reconcile her place in the lives of both women and torn between the traditions of their culture and her new society. Rum unveils the three stories simultaneously, moving mostly between 1990 and 2008 but including other time periods as memory and their lives require. The implications of arranged marriages, of the role of women in their culture, ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod and of the power to choose one's own destiny lie at the center of the narrative, and I found Isra and Deya, in particular, to be empathetic as they work to carve their own paths in the midst of lives restricted by generations of oppression. There is much to admire in Rum's novel, though I did find myself admiring the craft and perspectives from a distance rather than feeling totally immersed in the book. 1mo
18 likes1 stack add2 comments
blurb
UnabridgedPod
The Marrow Thieves | Cherie Dimaline
post image

Our most recent episode focuses on three of the Global Read Aloud books for this year: The Marrow Thieves, The Bridge Home, and Front Desk. Tune in for a spoiler-free discussion of each book and a consideration of how each would work in the classroom!

review
UnabridgedPod
Revenant Gun | Yoon Ha Lee
post image
Pickpick

Yoon Ha Lee's Revenant Gun is the third and final book of a trilogy that still, quite often, confuses me. There are large swaths of this series that I don't understand . . . but it doesn't matter. (When I make statements like this, I always think about Stephen King, in On Writing, talking about Cormac McCarthy.) This science fiction trilogy is "math-y" and focused on a series of calendars and their impacts on the universe and a world ⬇️

UnabridgedPod that just escapes my comprehension. But it's also about conformity and resistance of it, about the possibility for redemption, about the role of our relationships with individuals and how they might impact our societies. The continuing saga of Jadao, who has been reborn over centuries in a series of bodies because of both the hatred of his world and of his world's attempts to use him for their own devices, ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod is--for me--both empathetic and sympathetic. I also appreciated the discussion of what it means to be human (shout out to my sci fi lit class during interterm at Bridgewater College!). Brilliant, affecting science fiction. And fiction. 1mo
15 likes2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

I have now both re-read and re-watched Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets--I'm making slow but satisfactory progress in my goal to re-read the series (for the first time!). I've come to realize how much the films are tied up in my memories of the books. Because my boys have watched and re-watched the movies (and I've watched with them, of course), they often take precedence in my memory of the series. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod I said in my review of Sorcerer's Stone that these early books (and movies) aren't my favorite, and that still holds true. What re-watching films 1 and 2 has shown me, though, is what a deep appreciation I have for the books. Those first two movies take *most* of the big plot points, but they leave out the delicious details that Rowling builds in the novels. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod Everything is SO fast in these first movies that we lose some of the character development that I appreciate in the novel. It takes a LONG time for Harry to get to Hogwarts in Chamber of Secrets--in the movie, it's no time at all. And yet, we miss the way that Harry's knowledge of his family history has altered the way he interacts with the Dursleys, and we don't feel as much his loneliness at not having heard from Ron and Hermione. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod That means, of course, that we don't feel quite as much the impact Dobby's intervention has had on him

Anyway, it's not going to be a shock to anyone when I say that the book is so much better . . . but wow, it really is. Chamber of Secrets powerfully draws for readers a portrait of Voldemort's charisma and his power to manipulate--we see the true insidiousness of his villainy here. ⬇️
1mo
UnabridgedPod And we see the Malfoys as more than just unpleasant rivals but as murderous and evil accomplices to Voldemort's worst goals. Is this novel perfect? No. But oh my goodness, it's so good. Can't wait for book 3.⠀

Note: My twelve-year-old wanted to help with this photo--he decided that his door would be the perfect backdrop. 😁
1mo
27 likes4 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

@kirkmoyers and I have been devouring Veronica Mars recently. We (well, especially, I) made a valiant effort to re-watch seasons 1-3 in advance of the release of the BRAND NEW season 4 on Hulu. And then season 4 dropped early. I hoped to finish re-watching, but I was SO worried about it being spoiled that we went ahead and watched while I was still in the midst of season 2. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod (No spoilers here, but I have FEELINGS. Let me know if you want to talk about the new season.) ⠀

I quickly learned through some semi-accidental internet reading that Rob Thomas had declared the two Veronica Mars novels as canon whose plot outcomes would affect season 4, and I remembered that I hadn't read Mr. Kiss and Tell, which I quickly remedied . . . in the midst of watching seasons 2 AND 4.
1mo
UnabridgedPod Yes, there's a lot of juggling happening here. But I'm so loving it.⠀ 1mo
UnabridgedPod In the mean time, the newer shows on my TiVo continue to wait, and the things that Kirk and I have been trying to watch all summer are still piling up. But I don't care. The whipsmart dialogue, noir feel, and comfort of familiar characters have made this detour into Neptune so, so worth it. Here's hoping for season 5! (edited) 1mo
18 likes3 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
The Need | Helen Phillips
post image
Pickpick

SOME SPOILERS AHEAD!⠀

Have you ever frozen in a quiet home, convinced that you've heard footsteps in another room? or someone creeping in your hallway? You're almost POSITIVE that you're imagining things. But there's always that chance . . .⠀

Helen Phillips's The Need gave me SUCH Dark Matter vibes. (continued in comments)

UnabridgedPod It was less science centered than Blake Crouch's novel but asked similar questions about how unique each of us really is, what we would do if driven by desperate circumstances to fight for the lives and families we've built. In The Need, Molly is a paleobotanist and mother. In her work life, she is working with her partners both to uncover plant fossils and to puzzle out a set of slightly "off" discoveries. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod At her home, she and her husband David--who often has to travel for work--are raising their children, four-year-old Viv and infant Ben. She is also fighting an overwhelming anxiety that causes her to see and hear threats in her home that are PROBABLY imaginary. Probably. ⬇️ 1mo
UnabridgedPod I raced through The Need, completely absorbed by its questions about identity, motherhood, and gratitude, all wrapped in an engaging mystery and a world just on the other side of fantasy. Perfect, weird, suspense novel with an ending that made me flip back to re-read it. 1mo
lele1432 Great review! I was shocked that I hadn't seen anyone else compare this to Dark Mattwr until this review! I enjoyed it as well. It really made me think! 1mo
UnabridgedPod @lele1432 Thanks! I definitely thought those parallels to Dark Matter popped. 😀 1mo
15 likes2 stack adds5 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Linda Holmes's Evvie Drake Starts Over is SUCH a perfect contemporary romance. Protagonist Evvie, who becomes a widow on the night she's decided finally to leave her husband, is trying to reconcile the grief of those who are mourning her husband with her own conflicted feelings. And then her best friend tells her about a friend who can take some weight off of her shoulders by renting her attached apartment and paying some rent. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod Dean is a professional baseball player with the yips who is feeling media scrutiny by spending some time in Evvie's small town. 1mo
UnabridgedPod I loved both of these characters so much, and watching their relationship grow as each grieves something lost is simply beautiful. I love a good romance, and this one felt like a new take on the genre, one in which each move and each step felt authentic. The writing and character development are just gorgeous. I can't recommend this novel enough! 1mo
19 likes2 stack adds2 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

I've had Louise Penny's Still Life, the first in her Inspector Gamache series, on my Kindle forever. I was prompted finally to read it by the recommendation of Sara on an episode of Unabridged. I‘m so glad that I finally picked it up, and I can't wait to read the rest of the series. This book is one of the reasons I love mystery series: ⬇️

UnabridgedPod yes, it's the mystery, but it's more the continuation of compelling characters, and I love Gamache who is strong and brilliant and imperfect. A promising beginning to a series I'm sure I'll enjoy.⠀

Have you read Louise Penny's books? Which are your favorites? What other detective series do you enjoy?
1mo
Johanna414 I just read this a couple months ago and have to agree with everything you said! Inspector Gamache is such a compelling character 1mo
UnabridgedPod @Johanna414 I can‘t wait to read book 2. ❤️ 1mo
IvoryLunatic I thought this was the first one in the Gamache series? Or was there a series with him before? I‘ve never really been a mystery fan but have been wanting to try again and figured this would be the best start. 1mo
UnabridgedPod @IvoryLunatic You‘re right—it‘s the first in that series. 1mo
26 likes1 stack add5 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Alyssa Cole's An Unconditional Freedom, the third in her Loyal League series, is a strong historical romance. Cole's Author's Note, in which she explores the difficulty of writing about black characters' fighting for freedom from slavery at a time of "surging White supremacy" places the novel in a context that illuminates the importance of exploring this time period. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod I love her conclusion that "[the book's happily ever after] is in the *possibility* of perfecting, in finding a community of like-minded people who share similar goals and work toward them, together" (loc. 3934). 2mo
25 likes1 stack add1 comment
blurb
UnabridgedPod
post image

⭐️JULY WRAP-UP⭐️ - Here are some numbers from my reading month:⠀

31 Books Total⠀
5 Audiobooks⠀
4 Nonfiction⠀
5 Romance⠀
6 YA & Middle Grade⠀
2 Short Story Collections⠀

This was a great reading month for me--I really liked almost everything I read.

Do you see any favorites here?

emilyrose_x Harry Potter is one of my favourites! 2mo
ShyBookOwl That's like a book a day!! Incredible! Do u sleep??? 2mo
UnabridgedPod @ShyBookOwl This is one reason I love summer!! ❤️ 2mo
UnabridgedPod @emilyrose_x I‘m so enjoying re-reading the books. 2mo
StillLookingForCarmenSanDiego Amazing! 💕📚💕 2mo
17 likes5 comments
review
UnabridgedPod
post image
Pickpick

Helen Ellis's short story collection American Housewife is narrated by Kathleen McInerney, Lisa Cordileone, Rebecca Lowman, Dorothy Dillingham Blue, and they are FABULOUS. I thoroughly enjoyed this hilarious, uncomfortably true (I listened on Scribd), insightful collection targeted at the modern Southern woman. ⬇️

UnabridgedPod Ellis covers everything from bra fitters to decorating a shared hallway, and in each story, she offers a new, slightly askew angle on a typical part of our modern lives. Loved this! 2mo
20 likes1 comment