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Theaelizabet

Theaelizabet

Joined February 2019

Library trustee. History enthusiast. A lover of theater, too. http://www.librarything.com/profile/
review
Theaelizabet
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Pickpick

John Keats died 200 years ago at the age of 25. In her new book, Miller provides an interesting and thoughtful consideration of the poet through close readings and the contextualizing backstories of nine poems (and that infamous epitaph).

Suet624 I didn‘t realize he was only 25 9mo
BarbaraBB Hi Teresa, just checking in. I hope all is well. Missing you in the book club! 6mo
21 likes2 comments
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Theaelizabet
The Dud Avocado | Elaine Dundy
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QUESTION 5 #NYRBbookclub

What did you think of the ending? Is the ending “happy“ for Sally? Did it satisfy you?

vivastory I loved the ending. I would have liked another 40-50 pages to develop her relationship with Max but it seemed like she was showing that she had not sacrificed the carefree aspect of her personality. 13mo
GatheringBooks I thought it was just the right ending with the perfect note of reluctance, uncertainty coupled with yet another firm resolution that she is determined to see through to the fullest. It was in keeping with the impulsive, blindside-the-reader-because-its-fun type of ending that simply came out of nowhere. Just like Sally Jay. 13mo
vivastory @GatheringBooks Exactly, the ending perfectly suited Sally Jay's personality. Dundy didn't impose her own. I would have liked more, but I was perfectly happy not getting more bc as you said 'blindside-the-reader-because-its-fun type of ending' was a memorable way to end it. 13mo
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Theaelizabet @Gatheringbooks I'll admit that I wanted more for her, but you make a good point. it was in keeping with her. She probably will dye her hair black to “get into the swing of things,“ and that's as it should be. Loved the last two paragraphs! 13mo
Leftcoastzen I thought it was a good ending. They are both somewhat unconventional people that may actually end up together.Upbeat & fun (mostly) there were many Lol moments. The uncle‘s letter made me laugh a lot! 13mo
batsy Yes to what @GatheringBooks said. I don't know if it's necessarily "happy" but it sort of points to her indefatigable spirit! And I found that optimism very welcome, particularly reading it in 2020 ? But I do agree @Theaelizabet I want more for her, too. I would have liked a sequel... 13mo
LeahBergen My sappy heart loved the ending. I want to think of her dyeing her hair, wearing the “wrong” clothes, and off on continual adventures. 13mo
14 likes7 comments
blurb
Theaelizabet
The Dud Avocado | Elaine Dundy
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QUESTION 4 #NYRBbookclub

Why does it take her so long (and Teddy's warning) to see Larry for who he was? As you read, how did you see Larry?

vivastory That honestly caught me a bit off guard. I greatly enjoyed this book, but I was a bit distracted in the middle of the book. I felt like the beginning & the end were the strongest so I missed a few of the warning signs. There were so many characters entering & leaving the pages, the overall tone of the book often felt like watching a Fellini movie (esp La Dolce Vita) 13mo
Theaelizabet @vivastory Me, too! At least the extent to which he was violent and brutish. But all along I kept thinking something wasn't quite right. Great point about La Dolce Vita, plus it sounds like something Sally would recognize and name drop! 13mo
vivastory @Theaelizabet The book felt like it was very much in conversation with cinema, with Sally being an actress & spending her days in theaters etc. It's no wonder that Marx blurbed it. 13mo
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GatheringBooks As the trite adage goes, it‘s difficult to wake up a person who isn‘t asleep to begin with (or simply pretending to sleep). I think she was determined to see Larry in the best light possible, regardless, because she has already made a conscious decision that she was in love with him and by golly she will see that through. I never trusted Larry at the get-go. Found him to be an opportunistic pretentious fop, convinced of his own genius. 13mo
vivastory @GatheringBooks Excellently said! I agree though, sometimes people just can't be convinced that there's something wrong (seems to be the case with politics & love) 13mo
Leftcoastzen Because she was so direct at describing most of the other characters , it‘s easy to see her being a bit sweet on Larry not to see some of the signs.The passport was a big clue to me.Some of his behavior she observed at a distance made me know he wasn‘t on the up & up. 13mo
mklong I know that Teddy was a jerk too, but I actually believed he was serious when he warned her about Larry. His observation that he didn‘t react either when she left the table or when she came back, was pretty impressive. I completely see why she didn‘t listen to him, but the signs were there all along. 13mo
vivastory @mklong When he didn't react I believed him completely. I just couldn't recall if there were signs that Larry had stolen her passport earlier in the book. 13mo
Theaelizabet Part of what obscured her ability to see him clearly, I think, was that she saw the Larry she wanted to see (ah, the young) and the two had some things alike (which Larry notes at one point): their cleverness in commenting/categorizing others; their ambition, which was often placed in artistic endeavors, etc. He was good looking and she saw the bits of herself that pleased her, perhaps? (edited) 13mo
mklong @vivastory Oh I see what you mean. Since I was rereading and knew what would happen with the passport, my ears perked up in their very first conversation when Sally talks about losing her pearls. It read to me this time like he was sizing her up as a mark 13mo
youneverarrived You can tell in their first conversation there‘s something a bit off about him, like @mklong says about the pearls, but she‘s so enamoured with him from the get go I think she‘s pretty naive to his faults. She just sees him as she wants to rather than what he is. Saying that, I didn‘t have a clue it was him that stole the passport until it was revealed. 13mo
Suet624 This question and the comments make me want to finish reading the book! Hoping my concentration will improves soon. 13mo
vivastory @youneverarrived Yes, I think part of the problem too is she doesn't have any reliable friends early on that she would have been able to discuss any concerns with. She was stranded overseas & had to rely on her own judgment, which was clouded by her feelings. But as you pointed out he didn't really do anything to really stand out immediately. 13mo
vivastory @Suet624 I think it's def worth checking out, so when you are able to concentrate I def recommend it. I know my attention was meandering a bit in the middle. 13mo
batsy I agree with @GatheringBooks' assessment of Larry. I think Sally Jay couldn't see it because she's "green", and thus still naive. She still has a lot to learn about people. She was also nursing a bit of a crush. I think this kind of blinkered perspective brought about by youth and naivete and the urge to see good in everyone was kind of deftly handled by Dundy; Sally Jay is rarely foolish, but she still can be wrong. 13mo
LeahBergen The truth about Larry‘s character actually took me by surprise and I somehow didn‘t see it coming that he could be so brutal. I think this probably shows how clever Dundy is at getting us inside Sally Jay‘s mind and having us experience events as she does. 13mo
youneverarrived @vivastory that is true! Her feelings for him definitely blindsided her. @LeahBergen I felt the same. 13mo
15 likes17 comments
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Theaelizabet
The Dud Avocado | Elaine Dundy
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QESTION 3 #NYRBbookclub

“And yet he was, I suppose, my first real relationship.” (p. 140) What did “a real relationship” seem to mean to Sally? Why did she leave Jim?

vivastory She seemed to want to experience more of the world & life before she wanted to commit to a relationship. From what I recall he also said some pretty stupid things too 13mo
Theaelizabet She seemed to care for Jim, but for all his artistry, he was a traditionalist. And it seemed to me she took a hard look at what she thought she was being asked to commit to and said no. ('I tried to remember one minute that whole week end when Marion and I weren't either feeding people, or clearing up from doing it, or preparing to do it again....But I couldn't see why...I should.“) 13mo
GatheringBooks The book was first published in 1958- which makes it pretty revelatory in terms of how intimate relationships are portrayed. While Sally Jay evidently had this wild streak that she took pride in, she may have equated “real relationships” as those which resembled that which she had always known to be true and inevitable? Expected as matter-of-fact with the clearly defined roles? While Jim‘s expectations rankled at her, she struggled, but barely. 13mo
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Leftcoastzen I think she wanted some sexual experiences just like anyone.Of course some novels wouldn‘t go there at the time this was written.You can feel the domesticity of some of the scenes with Jim.Some of those effects are comforting , some horrifying,yet she doesn‘t want that yet. (edited) 13mo
Theaelizabet @Leftcoastzen You're right that some novels “wouldn't go there,“ but this one sure did, didn't it? (p. 20 “You know how it is. Some people can hack and hack away at you and nothing happens at all and then someone else just touches you and you come...yes, I mean that's what happened. I mean I came.“) I read that that paragraph was cut in the first edition, but that Dundy got it returned for the second. 13mo
vivastory @Theaelizabet @leftcoastzen I was also a tad bit surprised by some of the profanity. Although it was edited, it was pretty obvious what was intended. 13mo
youneverarrived @GatheringBooks great points there! I think she left him because she didn‘t want that domesticity; she didn‘t want to be doing the cleaning or the cooking as Jim would probably be expecting. I feel like there relationship in terms of their feelings for each other was more equal & mutual than with Teddy or Larry though. (edited) 13mo
batsy I found that a puzzling remark & I was mulling it over, as well. I think real to her means what she's been used to seeing as real—tepid almost, domestic. And she's learning that she's a person who can't settle for that version of a real relationship despite living in an era where that would have been held up as the ideal. I think Sally Jay kind of screwing up & lusting after the wrong men would have been subversively feminist for its time. 13mo
LeahBergen @Theaelizabet I loved that “hack and hack away” section! It was shocking and so cleverly situated near the beginning of the book. 13mo
11 likes9 comments
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Theaelizabet
The Dud Avocado | Elaine Dundy
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QUESTION 2 #NYRBbookclub

“To my chagrin, I found all my clothes...splitting themselves resolutely into three categories: Tyrolean Peasant, Bar Girl and Dreaded Librarian.“ (p. 56 NYRB edition). Sally alludes to being mistaken for a librarian, has the Dreaded Librarian Dream, attempts to become a librarian, and finally ends up in a man's bed that's in his library. What the heck is going on here?

vivastory The bed in the library cracked me up. I think that for Dundy this was a symbol of spinsterhood & stasis. Of being stuck in place. 13mo
Theaelizabet I think she both feared and admired “The Dreaded Librarian.“ It's a thing too normal (and possibly dull), but she's a literate, well-read girl if her allusions are any example, and The Dreaded Librarian seemed to both haunt and entice her. 13mo
Leftcoastzen I remember being young and looking at my wardrobe & thinking this dress makes me look too...something.I think you dream of what you long for yet fear .I hated in It‘s a wonderful life that they portrayed Mary as a meek ,sad, spinster librarian if she doesn‘t marry George.I saw ending up in a bedroom library as having a certain symmetry. 13mo
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vivastory @Leftcoastzen That's a good point & I think true that people dream of what they long for & yet fear. Also there's the kindness that was shown to her in Chicago by the clerk that resembled a librarian. That memory was very important to Sally 13mo
GatheringBooks I love the q and “what the heck is going on here” by @Theaelizabet - Indeed! I love how @vivastory once again arrived at the perfect symbolic significance “spinsterhood and stasis” that totally escaped me - Could be Dundy‘s throwaway tribute to librarians? Tongue-in-cheek? But yes, there is something about librarians that def appealed to and appalled her both at once. Glad that the former won out. 13mo
Leftcoastzen @vivastory Yes , I loved how the positive encounter with clerk in Chicago brought bus an “ah Ha“moment ! 13mo
youneverarrived 😂 I think she‘s so full of adventure and runs away a couple of times (or thinks about it) that to her it‘s a dreaded thing being stuck in the same place, in the one role etc. It feels like a fear thing but like others have said she also possibly craves it in some way. 13mo
emilyhaldi "what the heck is going on here" ...thanks for saying what I was thinking ? 13mo
batsy @vivastory Yes, I think so too! I remember thinking "what the heck is going on here" myself but felt like Dundy was also being tongue-in-cheek about that stereotypical image which would have held quite a bit of relevance in the 1950s—a woman should be anything but the dreaded spinster librarian! 13mo
LeahBergen All I could think was “Wow. I would‘ve loved to have awoken from a one-night stand to find myself in the New York library bed of a man who owned the entire brownstone”. 😂😂 13mo
youneverarrived @LeahBergen 😂😂😂 13mo
12 likes11 comments
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Theaelizabet
The Dud Avocado | Elaine Dundy
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QUESTION 1 #NYRBbookclub

Sally Jay Gorce is funny and certainly has her faults. Did you also find her to be smart? Silly? Aware of the world? Delusional? Something else? Did you root for her? Why or why not?

@vivastory @BarbaraBB @emilyhaldi @sprainedbrain @mklong @youneverarrived @LeahBergen @Leftcoastzen @Liz_M @merelybookish @MicheleinPhilly @gatheringbooks @saresmoore @sisilia @Reviewsbylola @batsy @Suet624

vivastory I think that she becomes a bit more guarded by the end of the book. One of the things that appealed to me was her infectious energy & devil may care attitude, which occassionally backfires. But she learns from it. At the same time she never struck me as a wide-eyed idealist. I def rooted for her. 13mo
Leftcoastzen Ah , the exuberance of youth! I think she wanted to grab this opportunity with enthusiasm, but as a young person she has lessons to learn. She is wise in sly ways . Like @vivastory I rooted for her. 13mo
Theaelizabet Yeah, I rooted for her. I loved her takes on her world, laughed at her categorizing/classifying (“What is he--G.I., Fulbright, Guggensheim, or Rockefeller?“, The Hard Cores, etc.), which often seemed astute. 13mo
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batsy I definitely rooted for her. Funny, clever, self-aware, but also quite ignorant in the way only the young can be...I found that aspect very realistic. Like the others said her enthusiasm and energy are infectious, and I found her so charismatic. Her inner voice was so gloriously fun and irreverent. 13mo
vivastory @batsy Very irreverent! I felt like it was a disservice to be making this comparison, as they are entirely different books & characters, but I simply couldn't think of Sally as a less abrasive Harriet from After Claude 13mo
Theaelizabet @vivastory I had the same thought! Though ultimately, Sally seemed to have more agency. 13mo
vivastory @Theaelizabet Def, & that made her a more fully realized character IMO 13mo
GatheringBooks @batsy i agree with all your thoughts here @vivastory - i was on her camp thruout even while she was being the perfect diva in their overly extended trip. I think more than ignorant, she was naive? There is def the youthful exuberance screaming invulnerability but there was always something genuine about her that I gravitated towards. 13mo
batsy @vivastory Oh, that's a good call! Harriet felt more weighed down while Sally Jay has that elastic resilience to her that youth can give (I can't recall how old Harriet was...) 13mo
vivastory @GatheringBooks Good point about her being genuine & I def agree! I loved her line earlier in the book about hating to travel by plane, train & boat. Seemed like a sign of things to come later on with her trip, but I couldn't help but be sympathetic. I like to travel in theory 😂 13mo
vivastory @batsy Harriet was def more jaded than Sally, even if it may have been a bit of a front 13mo
mklong This was a reread for me and I loved Sally Jay even more this time around. I agree with @GatheringBooks that she is certainly naïve, but she is self aware enough to know that. She has a great thought watching other women at the Ritz who she believes have the life that she is pretending to have. 13mo
LeahBergen Sorry, fellow book clubbers; I‘m late in finishing this one (I‘m about halfway through) but I‘ll come back here and chime in when I‘m done! ❤️ 13mo
vivastory @mklong I will def be reading this one again when my reading focus is a bit better. I'm glad that you got more out of it the second time. That section struck me as well, she had some great observations. 13mo
vivastory @LeahBergen No worries, friend! I'll be glad to hear your thoughts! @billypar @tanisha_a @catebutler @kvanread feel free to chime in with the discussion as well! (edited) 13mo
Billypar I'm in the same boat as @LeahBergen - about 55% through now. Life has not been cooperating with reading or Litsy time lately! But I've been loving this so far. I didn't take to Sally Jay right away- she seemed a little snobbish at first, like the way she spoke was at odds with her bohemian tastes. But she's growing on me - I think she is very smart, so I'm enjoying her wry observations about the personalities she encounters. 13mo
merelybookish Also here with apologies. 😐 I read this a few years ago and loved it. I intended to give it a skim/re-read in time for discussion but alas that didn't happen. I remember finding Sally Jay a delight! 13mo
youneverarrived Ohh good question! I agree with @vivastory that she becomes more guarded towards the end of the book. In a lot of ways she comes across as quite naive but I think she‘s also very aware of herself so she balances herself out. 13mo
emilyhaldi I love the comparison of Sally Jay to my old favorite Harriet!! 😆 I think they both certainly rank up there as a couple of my fav protagonists. I want to second everything @batsy said about Sally Jay, I found her so fun! 13mo
vivastory @Billypar I really liked her from the beginning, but I could def see her being an acquired taste. Hopefully everything is okay in your life or is on it's way to improving. Fingers crossed! 13mo
vivastory @merelybookish She's great! Hope you are well! 13mo
vivastory @youneverarrived I was a bit jealous of her impulsivity. I find myself missing the carefree days of my youth. I found it to be a good antidote to lockdown too, it was a vibrant book, full of travel (even if it reminded me of how obnoxious traveling can be) 😂 13mo
vivastory @emilyhaldi I have to admit that out of all of the NYRB selections, Harriet has really stuck out. I'd say she's in the top 5 probably 😂 13mo
sisilia @Theaelizabet @vivastory I‘m late with this one; just started it yesterday 🤦🏻‍♀️ I will come back here when I‘m done 😙 13mo
vivastory @sisilia Sounds good! I look forward to your thoughts 👍 13mo
LeahBergen Just like @vivastory said ... I was a tad jealous of her impulsivity and had a momentary twinge of nostalgia for my early twenties. 😆 I was definitely rooting for her! 13mo
youneverarrived @vivastory vibrant is the exact word for it! It was a fun read for sure with a character like Sally Jay. 13mo
13 likes27 comments
review
Theaelizabet
The Dud Avocado | Elaine Dundy
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Pickpick

“...I reflected wearily that it was not easy to be a Woman in these stirring times. I said it then and I say it now: it just isn‘t our century.”
Sally Jay Gorce
The Dud Avocado
1958

#nyrbbookclub

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Theaelizabet
Rogue Male | Geoffrey Household
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OCTOBER #nyrbbookclub
@vivastory

I hope these will be of interest. The choices are:

1. Rogue Male by Geoffrey Household
2. Journey by Moonlight by Antal Szerb
3. The Dud Avocado by Elaine Dundy

@batsy @BarbaraBB @emilyhaldi @sprainedbrain @mklong @youneverarrived @LeahBergen @Leftcoastzen @Liz_M @merelybookish @MicheleinPhilly @GatheringBooks @sarasmoore @sisilia @Reviewsbylola @Suet624

BarbaraBB Great choices! My vote goes to 1y
vivastory Nice selection 👍 My vote is for Dud Avocado 1y
LeahBergen Great options! I‘m going to go with the one that‘s been sitting on my shelf for years 1y
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Suet624 Darn! I love the storyline of Rogue Male, but I love the title of The Dud Avocado. Groucho Marx said Dud Avocado made him laugh. But the author of Rogue Male said the main character of the novel was trying to stop Hitler and I kind of like that too. So I'll just go with the majority vote. 1y
vivastory @Suet624 Rogue Male does sound really interesting. I have both on my shelves 1y
mklong I also vote 1y
Liz_M I've read The Dud Avocado a few years back. I think in October I will be in the mood for a thriller rather than modernist literature. I vote for 1y
sisilia (edited) 1y
merelybookish I've read The Dud Avocado but will still vote for it because that is how life is these days. 1y
batsy Though Rogue Male sounds really interesting, I'm voting for the book that's long been tbr :) 1y
GatheringBooks I missed this entirely!! 😭😭 i am so glad this book won !! 1y
Theaelizabet @GatheringBooks It should be a fun read—and I‘ll bet we all could appreciate that these days! 1y
vivastory I need to get in touch with you about the October discussion. What is the best way? 13mo
Theaelizabet @vivastory I‘m on Voxer as Teresa A or you can email me at taustin7896@gmail.com 13mo
17 likes17 comments
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Theaelizabet
The Life of Emily Dickinson | Richard Benson Sewall
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My Emily Dickinson shelf. Understanding her and her process is a minor obsession of mine. Happy birthday, Emily. #EmilyDickson

LeahBergen I love this! 👏🏻👏🏻 I have a (small) collection of books about her, too. ❤️ 2y
Theaelizabet @LeahBergen She was an amazing artist, wasn‘t she? 2y
Kimberlone I still have “Because I could not stop for death” memorized from an assignment in HS English class! 2y
Theaelizabet @Kimberlone That‘s a great one to have in your mind! (edited) 2y
20 likes4 comments
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Theaelizabet
Expendable Man (Revised) | Dorothy B Hughes
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BarbaraBB Maybe it‘s for the best I don‘t live in the US 😂 2y
batsy @BarbaraBB Hahaha, I was just thinking the same 😆 2y
LeahBergen Damn! Too bad (or not?) that I live in Canada. 😆 2y
31 likes3 comments
review
Theaelizabet
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Pickpick

Delusions are easy to sustain when they‘re your only refuge. What happens when delusions fall away? Will you rise up? Or double down? And when your society and faith tradition offer little but judgement, do you even have a choice? A bleak, well-told tale. #NYRBbookclub

Leftcoastzen Love your review!❤️ 2y
Theaelizabet @Leftcoastzen Thanks! You ran a great group today. Thanks for that, too! 2y
vivastory Wonderful review!! 2y
Theaelizabet @vivastory Thanks so much! And thanks for overseeing/creating such a great book group! 2y
31 likes4 comments
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Theaelizabet
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LeahBergen I like how many of the #NYRBBookClub picks are shown with wine! 😆😆 2y
BarbaraBB You‘re back! I hope you‘re enjoying your evening! 😘 2y
Theaelizabet @LeahBergen Great minds think alike!😉 2y
Theaelizabet @BarbaraBB Thanks! I did! ☺️ 2y
33 likes4 comments
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Theaelizabet
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Reading about a biographer‘s time with Beckett and de Beauvoir—perfect read for a chilly fall day.

24 likes2 stack adds
review
Theaelizabet
After Claude | Iris Owens
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Pickpick

Harriet is self-involved, splenetic, pitiful--and funny. Her life “After Claude“ is just plain weird. She is decidedly not a good girl. Or a nice girl. Those smarter than me could probably trace a through line from her to Nadia of Netflix's Russian Doll, or to any other female character who's allowed to be a train wreck. I didn't like her, but I sure kept thinking about her. #nyrbbookclub

BarbaraBB Great review. It seems we‘re all agreeing again on our book this month! 2y
Theaelizabet @BarbaraBB Thanks! There‘s going to be a lot to chew on! 2y
vivastory I keep meaning to check out that show. Great review! 2y
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Theaelizabet @vivastory I disliked the show in the beginning, but hung in to see where they were headed, and ended up really enjoying it. That character had more agency than Harriet, but there were certainly similarities. Thanks. 2y
BarbaraBB Hi, just checking in. I am missing you in our NYRB book club! Hope all is well 💕 2y
Theaelizabet @BarbaraBB Thanks so much for thinking of me! Life got away from me (in good ways, not bad) and I just needed to set aside social media for a time. I hope to be back in the groove (and in the NYRB book club, which I so enjoyed) in November, December at the latest. Again, thanks for reaching out! 2y
BarbaraBB Just happy to hear you‘re well. Enjoy life‘s other things and I hope you‘ll be back in the book club later this year 😘 2y
33 likes7 comments
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Theaelizabet
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My new nonfiction read. A major shout out and thanks to @Notafraidofwords for graciously sending this book to me!

Graywacke Cool! I‘ve listening to it on my commutes. 2y
Theaelizabet @Graywacke I‘ve seen some of your posts about it. Can‘t wait to read your review. I‘m on chapter 6, so early days, but loving it, so far. 2y
Mitch Im so looking forward to reading this - think i might clear the whole of August! 2y
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Theaelizabet @Mitch I might STILL be reading it during August! 2y
SamAnne Plan to start this month. 2y
37 likes6 comments
review
Theaelizabet
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Pickpick

Lepore‘s history book isn‘t comprehensive (no Lewis and Clark), but what‘s not there, you won‘t miss. What IS there (a history of polling, for example) will force a long reading list of future follow-ups. Thankfully, it‘s well-annotated. Haven‘t had a history course since college or high school? Boy, are you going to be surprised by what you think you remember and by what you were never taught. Stirringly written. Highly recommended.

Leftcoastzen It looks good to me , I‘m so booked up😂 2y
Theaelizabet @Leftcoastzen Oh gosh, me, too!🙄 2y
LyndseyReads I added this to my list after I heard an interview with Lepore. I love her perspective. 2y
Theaelizabet @LyndseyReads I do, too. I also really liked her Book of Ages, which is about what we do know about colonial women from what we don‘t know about Ben Franklin‘s favorite sister. 2y
39 likes3 stack adds4 comments
review
Theaelizabet
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Pickpick

The Tony Awards are tonight and these are the shows that I‘ve been lucky enough to see. They all have merit, but I‘d like to shout out What the Constitution Means to Me by Heidi Schreck. Nominated for for Best Play and Best Actress, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, it will go on national tour this fall. Catch it if you can. If you can‘t, the script goes on sale in October. Plays demand embodiment, but this one will still be a powerful read.

teainthelibrary I listened to an interview with her - she sounds so cool! 2y
Theaelizabet @teainthelibrary She‘s very cool and, in the show, gives a clever, first-rate, civics lesson! 2y
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RaimeyGallant Sounds fantastic. 2y
Nute Way cool that you get to go to so many plays. It‘s something that I wish I could do more of. 2y
Theaelizabet @Nute Yeah, I‘m lucky that I have friends who have access to discount tickets and that I live close to a lot of theaters. 2y
Suet624 Hadestown was written and performed for years by Vermonters. I saw it in a small theatre within a bar years ago, saw it off Broadway (fabulous) and hope to see it sometime on Broadway. Anais Mitchell, the author, singing Why We Build the Wall always brings chills. (edited) 2y
Theaelizabet @Suet624 Lucky you! My friends who have seen it, loved it. I hope to see it and Oklahoma. 2y
sisilia This is the reason why I‘d love to live in NYC 😻 I went to To Kill a Mockingbird, Burn This, and Hamilton. Loved them all! 2y
Theaelizabet @sisilia I‘m going to miss Burn This! It‘s closing July 14th and I‘m leaving town on the 3rd and just won‘t be able to work it in. I enjoy Adam Driver‘s work. I assume he was as good as I‘ve heard. Yes, NYC theater is terrific! 2y
sisilia @Theaelizabet Before I went to see Burn This I read a review that says that Adam Driver‘s performance is as strong as John Malkovich‘s in the same play 30 years ago. I was skeptical about it 🤔 I mean, John Malkovich is quite a high bar 😬 But Driver didn‘t disappoint; he‘s rrreeeaallllyy good 👍🏻 2y
Theaelizabet @sisilia I‘m holding out hope for a last minute extension!😬 2y
34 likes12 comments
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Theaelizabet
The Quincunx | Charles Palliser
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Summer.

Catt Ooh. I‘m intrigued by the cover. (Love an old skeleton key!) Do tell us a bit! 2y
Theaelizabet @Catt I‘m doing a buddy read of it through June, so I‘ll let you know! It‘s a bit of a Dickens pastiche, but I‘m beginning to think it‘s more. Welcome to Litsy! 2y
Catt I shall look forward to the review! 2y
rubyslippersreads I‘ve had this on my TBR list for ages. 2y
Theaelizabet @rubyslippersreads Mine, too! It‘s quite a ride! 2y
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Theaelizabet
Montclair Book Center | Montclair, NJ (Bookstore)
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Reading slump? Just buy more books, right? From Montclair Book Center and an NYRB order.
#NYRB #NYRBbookclub #Virago #Viragomodernclassics

DivineDiana Love the beautiful covers! ❤️ 3y
SharonGoforth Absolutely!! And these books are gorgeous!!📚☺️ 3y
saresmoore Mmm, just what the doctor ordered! 3y
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catebutler I love when I see Virago‘s! 😍 3y
LeahBergen Ahh, the pretty green Viragos! 3y
vivastory Fantastic covers! BTW I love Lolly Willowes! 3y
emilyhaldi 🙌🏻 3y
Fridameetslucy I love that Montclair bookstore !! 3y
41 likes9 comments
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Theaelizabet
Montclair Book Center | Montclair, NJ (Bookstore)
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Great place to spend a drizzly day.

Billypar I love this shop! Great selection of used books , nice layout with different levels, and the used vinyls and CD's section is another plus. 3y
Leftcoastzen Looks great! 3y
Theaelizabet @Billypar @Leftcoastzen So many indies have closed in northern NJ. Glad this one is still around. 3y
41 likes3 comments
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Theaelizabet
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Pickpick

Cep divides (perhaps wisely) her complicated story into three distinct parts, with the third being the tale of Harper Lee‘s writing life after To Kill A Mockingbird. Cep can write, and there‘s much to recommend this book, but I can‘t help wondering if a more intertwined approach to its telling (especially of parts 2 and 3) would have forced a deeper look at creative desire and thwarted ambition. >>>>

Theaelizabet “Whatever she was writing, Harper Lee wasn‘t publishing any of it, but no “wonder” can be dismissed as “one hit” right away. It takes the passage of time for such language to feel applicable, and even then it is a strange and varied category, especially for writers of fiction.” from Furious Hours
3y
TheBookStacker As soon as I finish this long stint of 90 hour work weeks I plan to start this book. Can‘t wait! 3y
LeahBergen I‘m looking forward to this one! 👏🏻 3y
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Theaelizabet
Cassandra at the Wedding | Dorothy Baker
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Pickpick

I look forward to discussing this book later this month for the #nyrbbookclub. It has so many layers and the writing and the characters read so fresh, despite the book‘s 1962 publication date.
@vivastory @BarbaraBB

BarbaraBB Great pic and I agree, the writing feels timeless! 💕 3y
Leftcoastzen Cute kitty !It does have a timeless quality to it. Only about 70 pages in . 3y
youneverarrived Agree, it feels more current. 3y
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Liz_M Beautiful kitty! 3y
Theaelizabet @Liz_M Thanks! He‘s a senior rescue who has claimed our hearts. 3y
vivastory I completely agree, it feels very contemporary. The NYRB site compared her writing to Lahiri & Eugenides. 3y
Nute Adorably cute!🐈💛 2y
Theaelizabet @Nute Thanks! 2y
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Theaelizabet
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My favorite NYRBs. @vivastory #nyrbbookclub

vivastory I have The Summer Book, still unread. The rest of these sound really interesting! 3y
BarbaraBB I loved both The Summer Book and A Month in the Country 3y
Liz_M I've heard so many good things about AMitC! 3y
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review
Theaelizabet
The Old Drift | Namwali Serpell
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Pickpick

“Here we all are, he thought, sharing our lives in a former colony, each of us filled with bacterial colonies whose edges are as fixed as the borders of the country—which is to say, not very fixed at all.”

Via three families—indigenous, English, and Italian—Serpell charts the formation of Zambia. The telling is vivid, creative, rambunctious—and overstuffed. At 562 pages, she almost lost me a few times, but good storytelling kept pulling me back.

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Theaelizabet
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In the new film, Wild Nights with Emily, Molly Shannon gives us an Emily Dickinson to root for. So much better than that syrupy Belle of Amherst play or the somber Emily of the movie A Quiet Passion. An accurate portrayal? Who knows? Much of the tale, however, fits with what is known about Dickinson‘s 30+ years relationship and correspondence (found in the book Open Me Carefully) with her sister-in-law, Susan Dickinson. Whimsical and fun. #movie

Fridameetslucy Just saw the film and loved it. It not only normalizes Dickenson it left me with big questions about how academia and popular culture needed her to be “reclusive” and a “spinster” Dickenson was not understood in her lifetime for much the same reasons that she is so narrowly defined in ours. @Theaelizabet (edited) 3y
Theaelizabet I agree. I especially loved the scene between her and T. W. Higginson. It rang so true and explained so much. @Fridameetslucy 3y
Fridameetslucy @Theaelizabet. Right! And then the succession of one mansplaining dullard publisher after the other !!! (edited) 3y
Suet624 I saw the film this weekend. Had no idea what it was about - just a random selection and Molly Shannon! So good! 2y
Theaelizabet @Suet624 It was, wasn‘t it? And fun! 2y
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Theaelizabet
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24 likes1 comment
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Theaelizabet
Ghost Wall | Sarah Moss
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Pickpick

A family of three join a small college class to live as ancient Britons for two weeks in Northern England. Through this short, deceptively simple—and eerie—story, Moss explores the human need for power and identity. A tiny bit The Lottery, a little bit Lord of the Flies? But really, quite original.

29 likes3 stack adds
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Theaelizabet
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Pickpick

So ends my study of Jefferson via the work of Annette Gordon-Reed (writing here with Onuf). Earlier this year I read (and also heartily rec.) her books, The Hemingses of Monticello and Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy, and can say that I almost “see” Jefferson. Now I want to visit Monticello, though perhaps while there wear a t-shirt that reads “I‘m here for the Hemingses.” #americanhistory

review
Theaelizabet
Winter: A Novel | Ali Smith
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Pickpick

Four novels, published in consecutive years, focused on a particular season, and rooted in our current moment. From a lesser writer this would be no more than a stunt, but with Smith it feels like a funny and thoughtful friend is joining us in discerning a way forward through the morass. I await Spring....

Christinak My book club is reading winter this year... should I read autumn first? 3y
Theaelizabet @Christinak No, I don‘t believe so. Each book tells a different story with different characters. They‘re linked by themes. My guess is that Summer, when it comes, might need to be read last. Either of these would make for a good discussion. Lucky you! 3y
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Theaelizabet
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1. The Complete Calvin and Hobbes. Not really my all-time favorite, but the one that is currently helping me deal with the madness of the world right now.
2. How do you choose between Calvin and Hobbes?! Besides, any choice would tell you way too much about me.
3. The teacher, Miss Wormwood.
4. Calvin‘s time machine, of course.
5. @Erinreadsthebooks Thanks @Graywacke

13 likes2 comments
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Theaelizabet
The Stranger Diaries | Elly Griffiths
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Mehso-so

This had some nice Gothic touches, but the ending fell flat. And why three narrators? There seemed to be no reason for it in terms of the narrative. I‘ll stick with Griffiths‘s Ruth Galloway series. The first couple that I read were acceptable little mysteries.

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Theaelizabet
Just Kids | Patti Smith
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1. In New Jersey, just outside of NYC.
2. I like it here, but Italy would be a nice change.
3. London, Belgium, or Virginia, depending on which book I pick up.
4. Anything. These days, in the winter, we‘re fond of sundubu, a Korean spicy tofu stew, served with rice.
5. Hey everyone!
@j.rye ;) Sorry I‘m late!

@Maddeline

review
Theaelizabet
White Noise | Suzan-Lori Parks
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Pickpick

Four 30-somethings, college friends, deal with race in a decidedly non-post-racial world. One gets roughed up (Hamilton star Daveed Diggs) by the police and demands that another in the group “buy” him—and protect him—for a period of 40 days. Parks ALWAYS leaves you thinking, though I‘ll admit I thought Act II had a few too many threads to pull. Diggs (and the entire cast) was superb. Worth a read when the script is published. #theatre #theater

review
Theaelizabet
The Heavens | Sandra Newman
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Pickpick

This one is tricky. It has some beautiful writing, a clever premise that asks the big questions (do love and art really have power? What defines a well-lived life?, and so on.) and a wrenching portrayal of 9/11. But...overall it seemed a bit too cerebral and clever for its own good, its characters too removed. Not sorry I read it, just not as wowed as I thought I‘d be.

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Theaelizabet
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Bedtime reading on some nights.
“He swung about when I came in, and looked me over in a trice. I knew what the look meant, from having experienced it once or twice in my former places. Then he turned his back on me and went on talking to his wife; and I knew what that meant, too. I was not the kind of morsel he was after. “The Lady‘s Maid‘s Bell” from 1902.

kspenmoll Welcome to Litsy! A fellow history lover... ! 3y
StillLookingForCarmenSanDiego Welcome to Litsy 📖💖 3y
j.rye Your name is killing me 😂 3y
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Theaelizabet @j.rye Oh, no! Yeah, too many vowels, right? 🙄 3y
j.rye @Theaelizabet no! It‘s SO FUNNY! Unless it‘s not a play on the alphabet. Then ignore me. Hahaha. 3y
Theaelizabet @j.rye Ohhhhhh. No, but I wish I was that clever! 3y
j.rye That‘s what it looked like to me. Hahaha “The Aeliza-bet” 😂 3y
Eggs Welcome to Litsy 🤗 3y
Theaelizabet @Eggs Thanks! 3y
15 likes10 comments
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Theaelizabet
The Harvard classics | Charles William Eliot
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From the 1930s Harvard Classics reading guide: “The woman takes particular pride in having as part of her home this peerless set of books....It gives to her a sense of security that all is well on the intellectual side, as are clothes and food on the material side.” #internationalwomensday

CoffeeNBooks Welcome to Litsy! 📚 3y
TimSpalding Ha. Good old Harvard Classics. Growing up, every house had the set. Not surprisingly, you can't GIVE them away now :) 3y
Theaelizabet @TimSpalding I threw out an entire set at our library‘s book sale, but kept the reader‘s guide. It was just too funny. 3y
13 likes5 comments
review
Theaelizabet
Milkman | Anna Burns
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Pickpick

“The day Somebody McSomebody put a gun to my breast and called me a cat and threatened to shoot me was the same day the milkman died.” And so begins Middle Sister‘s account of navigating political and sexual terrorism, ostensibly in Northern Ireland, but really anywhere a group demands fealty to a community. Riveting...and sometimes really funny.

RaimeyGallant Loving this book. Welcome! 3y
Graywacke 👋 Nice to see you here. Welcome to Litsy 3y
Theaelizabet Thanks! 3y
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Theaelizabet
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Pickpick

I feel like I‘ve just returned from 70s/80s Belfast. Extraordinary storytelling right through to the last paragraph in the “Notes on Sources.” Narrative nonfiction at its best.

Chelleo Welcome to Litsy! Hope these #Litsytips by @RaimeyGallant http://bit.ly/litsytips and #LitsyHowTo videos: goo.gl/UrCpoU are helpful. There‘s so many fun things to do: book exchanges, buddy reads, photo challenges and more! #LitsyWelcomeWagon (edited) 3y
RaimeyGallant Welcome! 3y
Theaelizabet Thanks! 3y
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Eggs Welcome to Litsy 🌸🌺 3y
Theaelizabet @Eggs Thanks! 3y
AlwaysForeverReading Welcome to Litsy!!! ❤️💜♥️💕💚 3y
SharonGoforth I want to read this! Welcome to Litsy!!💕❤️📚 3y
Theaelizabet @SharonGoforth Thanks! I‘m still thinking about this book. 3y
13 likes3 stack adds9 comments