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Ruthiella
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Pickpick

5 marriages of well known Victorian writers/intellectuals: Jane Welsh and Thomas Carlyle, Effie Gray and John Ruskin, Harriet Taylor and John Stuart Mill, Catherine Hogarth and Charles Dickens, and George Eliot and George Henry Lewes. I was only familiar with Dickens. Fascinating stuff. Rose looks at how these unions affected careers and legacies and how they were seen in that era compared to our current perceptions of marriage. My 1st #Roll100

KathyWheeler When I got my MA in English 1000 years ago, my concentration was in Victorian Lit, and my thesis included both Carlyle and Dickens. Can‘t wait to check this out! 5h
Ruthiella @KathyWheeler Oh! I think you will like it then. 😃 5h
Cathythoughts Great collage! 2h
29 likes4 stack adds3 comments
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cwarnier
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Starting my next books. KC Chiefs are leading.
#lmpbc

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hissingpotatoes
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Nutmegnc I miss puzzles! Sadly I have no room to do them since I moved to this house 5 years ago 😢 (edited) 6h
17 likes1 comment
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4thhouseontheleft
The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story | Nikole Hannah-Jones, The New York Times Company
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Chapter 1 Key Names, Dates, and Terms:

Abolitionist, American Revolution, Bacon‘s Rebellion, Somerset Ruling, Crispus Attucks, Declaration of Independence, Dunmore Proclamation, Slave Codes, Dred Scott v. Sandford, Reconstruction, W.E.B. Du Bois, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Jim Crow, Civil Rights Act, Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965

#1619GroupRead

MallenNC I think this chapter makes a pretty good case for this characterization. “All men created equal” has always seemed hypocritical in a nation of slavery. I didn‘t know about the Dunmore proclamation by Royal Governor of Virginia before reading this. 8h
See All 10 Comments
megnews I think the founding fathers felt they were creating a democracy because there was freedom from a monarch. But I don‘t think that‘s what they created at all with so many left out of those freedoms. @MallenNC Very few former enslaved people who fought for England reaped the benefit of the proclamation. Many were left behind. 8h
IndoorDame I have no idea how self aware the founders were about their own hypocrisy, and what type of country they thought they were creating, but looking backwards I‘d say slavocravy is a good characterization. 8h
MallenNC @megnews That‘s not surprising since that proclamation offer was a war strategy and not for concern about human beings. 8h
mdm139 @IndoorDame I think the founding father‘s were a little aware of their hypocrisy and faults. They left a way to change the constitution (amendments). They knew they would make mistakes and morals would change through time. The ability to change the constitution is one of the reasons it has lasted so long. 8h
mdm139 https://youtube.com/watch?v=ImTi03FPBr8&feature=share I love this movie, and this scene pertains to our discussion 8h
mdm139 I think there were so many reasons for the Revolution and one of them was to maintain slavery, but it wasn‘t the only reason. Even the Loyalists that fought on the side of the British had their reasons, one being they thought it would end slavery earlier. (Even the new Outlander book addresses this) And now students are taught the Loyalists were the bad guys. As we said last week, history is taught by the winners. 7h
Bookish_Gal While not sure I believe it, I can understand it. The rules of democracy are there, both they are limited to who the founders believed deserved them. Everything was put together to keep the black American down, that they are inferior. They focused so hard on England, they lost themselves to slavery. They were so quick about it, they didn‘t think about any ramifications. Just pass on the blame. Americas (still is) a teenager in dealing with faults 6h
20 likes10 comments
review
GoodReads2021
Pickpick

An eye-opening history of the American West. After reading this work, you will gain a good understanding in how the mighty Comanche were defeated and the times they lived in.

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Vivlio_Gnosi
Theodore Rex | Edmund Morris

"When quarreling parties are both in the wrong, and are assailed with blame...they will do strange things to save their face." - Grover Cleveland

#history #politics

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bookandbedandtea
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Today's plans. I love weekends. 😁

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Cinfhen
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Super fascinating true story of two spirited rebels who defied the Nazi‘s with their quiet resistance. Thanks for sharing @TrishB #Pop22 #SapphicBook #NF22 #ImARuleBreaker Halfway point. Writing is a little dry but the story is too interesting to be boring.

TrishB This one can be quite dry. The fiction one puts the emotion into the story ❤️ 18h
84 likes1 comment
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erank58
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For 2022, I've set a goal to read at least one non-fiction book per quarter. I'm not a huge non-fic reader, but have always sucker for anthropology books!

Even though I'm enjoying this, I can already tell it's going to be very naval-gaze-ish 😑 Does anyone have any good anthropology books by non-white authors, or such books written by a member of that specific culture? (For example, a book about Machu Piccu written by a Peruvian author, etc)

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Oblomov26
Shakespeare's Local | Pete Brown
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Pickpick

I really enjoyed this book which is essentially a history of “The George” a inn in Southwark London which has existed since the time of Shakespeare and potentially considerably longer. From being one of many such establishments it is now the last, reduced in size from a series of buildings around an enclosed courtyard capable of holding theatrical performances to a much smaller public house as culture and technology changed.

50 likes2 stack adds