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Lysistrata
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
Lysistrata (/la??s?str?t?/ or /?l?s??str??t?/; Attic Greek: ??????????, "Army Disbander") is a comedy by Aristophanes. Originally performed in classical Athens in 411 BC, it is a comic account of one woman's extraordinary mission to end the Peloponnesian War. Lysistrata persuades the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands and lovers as a means of forcing the men to negotiate peacea strategy, however, that inflames the battle between the sexes. The play is notable for being an early expos of sexual relations in a male-dominated society. The dramatic structure represents a shift away from the conventions of Old Comedy, a trend typical of the author's career. It was produced in the same year as the Thesmophoriazusae, another play with a focus on gender-based issues, just two years after Athens' catastrophic defeat in the Sicilian Expedition (font: Wikipedia)
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Libby1
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Pickpick

An Ancient Greek play that is a strong contender for one of the funniest, raunchiest things I‘ve ever read.

To end an endless war, the women of Athens and Sparta band together in the decision to refuse sex until the war is ended.

Thank you for the chance to read this, @SerialReader . I loved it!

(Illustration from Google.)

Bookzombie I think I might read this for #Booked2019 . I read a YA a while back that was a retelling or used a similar premise. 2mo
batsy I loved it too! So brilliant. 2mo
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TheatreSpaz
Lysistrata | Aristophanes

Another play I read for my college acting class, I realized why my 10th grade English teacher didn't have us read it all those years ago and instead told us about it: IT'S FLIPPING DIRTY! Probably one of the raunchiest things I've ever read. I did really like it though the ancient Greeks views on women were appalling and that does come through in the writing toward the beginning.

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Lindy
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Leaving soon to see Lysistrata performed at Bard on the Beach tonight. I‘m feeling excited. 😊

minkyb Oh what fun! 1y
43 likes1 comment
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Lindy
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Pickpick

Not the tagged book, but Looking at Lysistrata: Eight Essays and a New Version of Aristophane‘s Provocative Comedy, edited by David Stuttard. Informative and academic; I‘m pleased to have read it. I was led to this book from the bibliography in Mary Beard‘s Women & Power: A Manifesto. I was able to get it via interlibrary loan, all the way from Newfoundland (6,000 km from Edmonton). #Litsyloveslibraries!

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Lindy
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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I‘m going to see two plays at Bard on the Beach in Vancouver at the end of July: Lysistrata and Timon of Athens. I didn‘t realize that there was a connection between the two until I read Lysistrata (in the modern adaptation by David Stuttard, above). I double-checked a standard translation online and there, too, found Timon “the rough-hewn fellow” who shuns everyone. It makes sense that Shakespeare would have read Aristophanes.

saresmoore Neat connection! 2y
Lindy @saresmoore Apparently Shakespeare decided to write the backstory explaining how Timon became a misanthropic hermit. It‘s fun to have made this discovery on my own, no matter how many other readers have made the same connection. 😊 2y
Lcsmcat Cool! 2y
MayJasper Good for you. News to me. I like - the vagrant who wasn't fragrant 😊 2y
44 likes4 comments
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Lindy
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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It‘s a good thing I brought my own book over to my friend‘s house where I‘m looking after her cats while she‘s away. Meat scientists have strange reading material. Front page story on the Western Producer: “Huge grain carryout expected.” (?!)

LeahBergen 😆😆 2y
AlaMich Meat scientists? 🤔 2y
Lindy @AlaMich @LeahBergen Yes, a professor of “carcass and meat science” according to her university business card. I teased her about the word ‘carcass‘ and she put me in my place by telling me she doesn‘t do “processed meats.” 2y
AlaMich @Lindy 😂 2y
LeahBergen Oh my. 😂😂 2y
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Lindy
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Scholars often point to the passage in Pericle‘s funeral oration, delivered in honour of the first Peloponnesian War dead in 431 BC, in which he tells the women who have lost men to bear up and not to make a fuss, since ‘the greatest glory of a woman is to be mentioned as little as possible.‘
-Edith Hall, The Many Faces of Lysistrata, in the essay collection Looking at Lysistrata.

DivineDiana Say what! 😳 2y
Lindy @DivineDiana I remember listening to an interview with the author Annabel Lyon, after she wrote a novel set in Ancient Greece. She was asked what she would have liked to say to Aristotle, if she had lived in his time. She said Aristotle would never have paid any attention to her, because she‘s a woman. 2y
DivineDiana Quite shocking to hear that. 🙁 2y
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Lindy
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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“Then card the wool into the work-basket of union and concord, mixing in everyone; and all the immigrants, and any foreigner who‘s friendly to you, and anyone in debt to the treasury, they should be mixed in as well. And yes [...] take the human flock from all of them, bring them together here and join them into one, and then make a great ball of wool, and from that weave a warm cloak for the people to wear.”
#knittersofLitsy: fibre arts metaphor!

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Lindy
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Lots of interesting stuff in ‘Looking at Lysistrata,‘ a collection of essays that‘s not in the Litsy database. 3 examples:
🏺The “phalli of comedy normally droop,” but they remain erect in this play.
🏺The main character was likely modelled on a real woman, Lysimache, who was the priestess of Athena at the time the play was first performed.
🏺Referring to a respectable woman by name in public was “a contravention of normal Athenian etiquette.”

Graywacke Ooh! I need to look this one up 2y
Lindy @Graywacke I‘m going to a see a production of Lysistrata in Vancouver at the end of July, so I‘m studying up. 🤓 2y
Graywacke @Lindy sounds fun! Should be a blast in performance. (My library has this book. Requested. 🙂) 2y
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Lindy @Graywacke The production at Bard on the Beach is a modern reboot and I‘m really looking forward to it. 2y
tournevis I love this play. 2y
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Kimberlone
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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If only all wars could be ended this way...

I forgot how funny this play is!

23 likes2 comments
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Brie
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Ancient Greece. The Peloponnesian War rages relentlessly. The women of Athens, led by Lysistrata, try to force the men to negotiate for #peace by withholding sex. Comedic hilarity ensues and gender relations are explored. #maybookflowers

PurpleyPumpkin Great choice for this prompt!👍🏽 3y
AmandaL Would you believe me if I told you that I was thinking Lysistrata too for this prompt? 👍 3y
Brie @AmandaL It's a good choice! I've seen one or two other Lysistrata posts. 3y
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batsy
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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saresmoore 🙌 I love that you and @Brie had the same pick for this prompt! 3y
batsy @saresmoore That was my introduction to @Brie with the excellent taste! 🤗 3y
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hwheaties
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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I love my job. I get to watch this modernized Lysistrata and see how much of it I can show my 11th graders.

josie281 Do report back how it was! 3y
OffTheBeatenShelf.com Yes! Please report back. 3y
minkyb I hope it is amazing so the kids will enjoy it! 3y
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hwheaties
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Next up for my juniors. I love this play so much.

#TeachersOfLitsy

BookishMarginalia Seems like an appropriate message of resistance right now. 3y
WhatDeeReads So funny! 3y
Natasha.C.Barnes You'd think they would at least choose an Ancient Greek statue for the cover...I'm not sure Pauline Bonaparte makes a very convincing Lysistrata... 😁 3y
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review
kevinst_96
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
Pickpick

Very good play, quite feministic already back to the days of Aristophanes. Really funny to read it. Hoping to find a good adaptation of it on the internet.

MrBook Welcome to @Litsy !!! We hope you enjoy your stay, I think you'll like it here 😎👍🏻! 3y
2 likes1 comment
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ValkyrieAndHerBooks
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Strong females and humanized animals? Sign me up! These are a few of my favorite #BannedBooks! If you haven't read them, give 'em a go for #BannedBooksWeek! #SeptPhotoChallenge

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Chey12
Lysistrata | Aristophanes
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Calonice: "And what if they grab us and drag us into the bedroom by force?"

Lysistrata: "Hold onto the door."

Calonice: "And what if they beat us?"

Lysistrata: "Then submit, but disagreeably: men get no pleasure in sex when they have to force you. And make them suffer in other ways as well. Don't worry, they'll soon give in. No husband can have a happy life if his wife doesn't want him to."

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BookNerdBritt
Lysistrata | Aristophanes, Sarah Ruden
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#FunFridayPhoto: favorite book you were assigned to read in school. This play was definitely the most hilarious thing my high school self was ever required to read.

I was tempted to use The Hobbit for this prompt, but it was assigned reading for a college seminar on Tolkien that I chose to take because I was already a Tolkien nerd and therefore probably shouldn't count. 🤓

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