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Tomboy
Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir | Liz Prince
33 posts | 50 read | 58 to read
Growing up, Liz Prince wasn't a girly girl, dressing in pink tutus or playing Pretty Pretty princess like the other girls in her neighborhood. But she wasn't exactly one of the guys either, as she quickly learned when her Little League baseball coach exiled her to the outfield instead of letting her take the pitcher's mound. Liz was somewhere in the middle, and Tomboy is the story of her struggle to find the place where she belonged. Tomboy is a graphic novel about refusing gender boundaries, yet unwittingly embracing gender stereotypes at the same time, and realizing later in life that you can be just as much of a girl in jeans and a T-shirt as you can in a pink tutu. A memoir told anecdotally, Tomboy follows author and zine artist Liz Prince through her early childhood into adulthood and explores her ever-evolving struggles and wishes regarding what it means to "be a girl." From staunchly refuting anything she perceived as being "girly" to the point of misogyny, to discovering through the punk community that your identity is whatever you make of it, regardless of your gender, Tomboy is as much humorous and honest as it is at points uncomfortable and heartbreaking.
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holarosarita
Mehso-so

I...really didn‘t actually like this very much. Although it comes to a proper conclusion, way too much time is spent on self-hate and boy drama along the way.

khooliha At least there were good animal illustrations. 7d
2 likes1 comment
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holarosarita
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snek

khooliha A very cute one! 1w
2 likes1 comment
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holarosarita
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🐌 content

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holarosarita
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A child has gotten to this graphic memoir. #librarybook

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holarosarita
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Now for something that won‘t take 12 hours to read. #agraphicmemoir #readharder2020

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booklover3258
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Pickpick

My book review for this graphic memoir is on my YouTube Vlog at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDMJzQ6xHaA

Enjoy!

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ReadingEnvy
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Reading Envy Podcast Episode 166: On Brand with Karen

Jenny was reading up to the minute we started recording because she wanted to talk about one of these books with Karen specifically. We talk about graphic novels in other languages, romance representation, and obscure science. And, as usual, we laugh a lot.
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https://tinyurl.com/ReadingEnvy166

Ruthiella Fan favorite KAREN!🎉 5mo
ReadingEnvy @Ruthiella 💃🤸 5mo
Lindy @ReadingEnvy Be sure to sign up Karen for your 666th episode. 😉 5mo
ReadingEnvy @Lindy heh! It was funny to realize the episode thing. 5mo
61 likes4 comments
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PerksOfBeingABookworm
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Panpan

I have been thinking for a few days about how to review this book. I can‘t fully explain why I really, really disliked Tomboy. It reads as a boring story about one person‘s friendships throughout her life. Her gender identity journey definitely takes the backseat in this book... that is about her gender identity. So much of this book is about Liz working through not being a boy, but not being a girl. Except, she does know she‘s a girl. Cont‘d👇🏼

PerksOfBeingABookworm So this book is marketed as and, for a limited time, seems to be written about a person who lives outside of the gender binary of being a boy or girl. But then at the end, she realizes that there are different ways of performing gender and she‘s just a cisgender gal. I read a whole, boring book hoping to learn about a non-binary person‘s journey, only to read about her friendships and realizations of being cisgender. 5mo
PerksOfBeingABookworm I think Tomboy could have been marketed in a different way. Tomboy wasn‘t at all what I was expecting and the synopsis doesn‘t seem to accurately represent the point of the book. And I find that really irritating. 5mo
51 likes2 comments
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PerksOfBeingABookworm
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“To borrow a metaphor from the kitchen sink... children form strong opinions easily. They soak up information from their parents, school, and the media and repeat it back to the world. So when you don‘t look or act like what everyone is told is the norm, you get proverbially barfed on a lot.”
This is so, so relatable.

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Krisjericho
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Pickpick

This is an honest, awkward, and funny graphic memoir. It is interesting because the gender issues explored are not about sexual orientation or identity in the sense that we usually see, but in a way where the person is cis and straight but doesn‘t fit what she is told a woman is. In fact, she has to confront her own biases against women to become comfortable in her own skin.

42 likes3 stack adds
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gibblr
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Pickpick

Tomboy is my last full book of 2018. (I fell short of my 85 book goal by 7 books in the end, but that‘s ok.) I enjoyed this graphic memoir of Liz Prince‘s struggle with gender nonconformity. Here‘s to lots more fabulous reads in 2019!! Happy New Year 🎆

pocketmermaid Love this book! 14mo
61 likes3 stack adds1 comment
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KerryLibME
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Just finished this amazing graphic novel!

9 likes1 stack add
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elizabethlk
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Pickpick

Decided to do the outsidey thing and read at the library instead of at home. Tomboy is an absolute blast of a graphic memoir, incredibly relatable, and deals with internalizing misogyny as a kid/teen.

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Natasha.C.Barnes
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Mehso-so

I expected more from this book--and I don't think it was written long enough ago to excuse it. A girl growing up dealing with how her sense of self doesn't align with society's gender norms is an important story to tell, but this author wasn't ready to fully analyze or unpack her childhood experiences-the discussion was still VERY invested in the gender binary, made zero mention of trans ppl, & BARELY acknowledged how (cont ⬇️) ...

Natasha.C.Barnes (Cont)...her childhood dislike of other girls/women who followed prescribed gender roles was itself a symptom of the patriarchy. That def needed more discussion, or at the very least a tone that felt less wishy-washy. Not everyone wants to investigate gender, but if you do, you're going to have to do better than "girls should be able to where pants and baseball caps" or whatever. I feel for the author's experiences and I want to see lots of ... 2y
Natasha.C.Barnes ...kinds of femininity represented, but there was STILL a tone of "aren't I cute and cool for not being girly" that I didn't appreciate, it just felt naive, uninvestigated. And no she didn't have to go way into trans stories if that's not her story, but zero mention of how gender might be complicated physically as well feels bizarre and irresponsible. 2y
68 likes2 comments
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ReadingOver50
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My January reading stats. It was a good reading month. I read Stephen King‘s It this month which was over 1100 pages long. I hope I can keep up the pace in February 😄

BookishMe Wow! Amazing start 2y
MissAimz_55 Great job!! 2y
kspenmoll Amazing reading! Cograts! 2y
117 likes3 comments
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ReadingOver50
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Pickpick

I absolutely loved this book. Liz's story was told in an extremely interesting way. Her feelings of alienation and not being accepted for who she is really resonated with me.

When she goes to a non traditional high school, she meets a group of peers who accept her for being herself. It is a shame that it takes so long for her to find peace, but I know there is a similar story for a lot of people. Learn to love yourself and know that you are ok.

107 likes2 stack adds
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Clwojick
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Pickpick

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

55 likes1 stack add
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Liberty
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Evening reading. 💕

jasminemarie I really liked this one. 3y
LeanneAslin I loved this! 3y
166 likes17 stack adds2 comments
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kendra
Pickpick

This was great. I was also a socially awkward Tomboy in the early '90's

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Chelsibno
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Pickpick

This #graphicmemoir was a great look into the struggles faced by people who don't conform to the societal expectations of their gender. Having grown up a #tomboy in a conservative town, I could relate to several of Liz's experiences and thoughts. The message "there are many ways to be a woman" emphasizes that a woman isn't in the wrong for liking things that society deems masculine. If anything, it makes her more awesome. #feminist

17 likes3 stack adds
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heidisreads
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an important #memoir about friends, bullies, growing up, and gender and all the other stuff in between #comix (and a quiet house and a cup of coffee and a mint brownie) #booksandtreats #riotgrams

12 likes2 stack adds
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ThatLibrarianLady
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Pickpick

This is such a kickass graphic memoir about gender non-conformity and the ideas surrounding gender that permeate every aspect of our culture. I recommend giving it a read! Also, I'm playing around with the Bookout app that tracks pages and reading time. Pretty cool.

alibrarianslibrary Yay you finally read it! 😊😊😊 3y
jessberk13 That's a cool image. Is that a tracking app? 3y
ThatLibrarianLady @jessica Yep. It's called Bookout. You can try it with 10 books for free and then it's 4.99. It's only on iOS so far. 3y
13 likes1 stack add3 comments
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josie281

My daughter got this for Christmas. I'm halfway through the preread. I understand the point, which is good, but I am not 💯 sold on how it is being presented. Will post full review later.

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CassellWrites
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Getting ready to read this graphic novel, recommended by my local librarian!

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CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian
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Mehso-so

Well this was underwhelming and surprisingly unnuanced. I think readers who are being introduced to the concept of oppressive gender norms (ie, lots of straight cis dudes & some women) could get a lot out of this, but not me. Plus it showed a lack of understanding about queer & trans people. It walks a dangerous line of expressing the idea that girls / femininity are weak & inferior w/out spending nearly enough time refuting and questioning that.

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CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian
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"I don't dress like a boy to attract girls." Uh...is this what all queer women do, dress like boys to get the ladies? Guess I missed that memo. Pretty sure masculine queer women dress they way the do for the same reason Liz Prince does: "because it feels natural."

19 likes1 stack add
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Christine
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Pickpick

I really enjoy graphic memoirs, and this one is now on my list of favorites. Smart and funny, and a touching and instructive story about gender identity. And I LOVED the art.

34 likes5 stack adds
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rachelm
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Pickpick

This is the book I needed to pull my mood up from the pit it's been in since certain events last week. I bought a stack of feminist graphic memoirs and decided to dig into this first. Prince is funny and astute and I want to sneak this book into my local middle school for the right girl to find at the right time.

The picture is of Liz giving the side-eye to the pink balloon my toddler was handed in the store this week.

65 likes7 stack adds
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Kelly
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over on @bookriot I rounded up great nonfic about girls and women for tweens and teens (& adults). dig in! http://bookriot.com/2016/10/19/excellent-nonfiction-girls-tween-teen-readers/

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ComradeMao
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2016, Book 33 "The stereotype of the butch lesbian has plagued me my whole life but I don't dress like a boy to attract girls. I dress like a boy because it feels natural to me.I wasn't against being gay. I was against being buillied. And I was tired of having these false labels applied to me. I would sometimes fantasise about what my life would have been like if I had been a normal girl. But I didn't like the Liz in those fantasies."

3 likes1 stack add
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intothehallofbooks
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Pickpick

*Astoundingly excellent* I grabbed this out of the kids' library bin + became instantly hooked. The honesty in here is refreshing and humorous-sometimes even heartbreaking. Guys can read this too! I saw myself in here AND my girls AND my boy. So glad I read this so I can discuss parts with my kids.

Chelsey Sounds good! I hope to find a kindred spirit here. I'm a cis-gendered straight woman who's never been a total tomboy, but who's brain doesn't quite fit the female stereotypes either. My husband and I are totally role reversed in a lot of things, but not most. Looking forward to this read. 4y
intothehallofbooks Hi @Chelsey! I can't wait for you to read this. Also I can't wait to see what you think. I felt some of the ways she describes when I was younger and I really think there is a much wider audience for this book than it has 😊 so so good! I'm so glad my girls grabbed it from the library. 4y
25 likes8 stack adds2 comments
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BookDedication
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This book sums up all of the feelings.

4 likes1 stack add