Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
Black Like Me
Black Like Me: The Definitive Griffin Estate Edition, Corrected from Original Manuscripts | John Howard Griffin
Publisher's description: Studs Terkel tells us in his Foreword to the definitive Griffin Estate Edition of Black Like Me: "This is a contemporary book, you bet." Indeed, Black Like Me remains required reading in thousands of high schools and colleges forthis very reason. Regardless of how much progress has been made in eliminating outright racism from American life, Black Like Me endures as a great human--and humanitarian--document. In our era, when "international" terrorism is most often defined in terms of a single ethnic designation and a single religion, we need to be reminded that America has been blinded by fear and racial intolerance before. As John Lennon wrote, "Living is easy with eyes closed." Black Like Me is the story of a man who opened his eyes, and helped an entire nation to do likewise.
Amazon Indiebound Barnes and Noble WorldCat Goodreads LibraryThing
blurb
Kpiper
Black Like Me (Anniversary) | John Howard Griffin
post image

Reading wears her out.

6 likes1 stack add
blurb
Beana6989
post image

I've heard this book was "heavy"... I'm finally getting my hands on it to dive it! The preface got me!
"The real story is the universal one of men who destroy the souls and bodies of other men....

Chelleo Welcome! Checkout #Litsytips: http://bit.ly/litsytips by @RaimeyGallant and #LitsyHowTo videos: goo.gl/UrCpoU. They‘re great and should help you get settled in. Follow @LitsyHappenings to find out about various challenges, buddy reads, meet-ups and swaps taking place. #LitsyWelcomeWagon Also check out #Blitsy 🤗 4y
RaimeyGallant Welcome! 4y
See All 8 Comments
Beana6989 @Chelleo thanks! 4y
Libby1 Welcome to Litsy! ❤️📚❤️ 4y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa I read this in HS, so good! 4y
AlwaysForeverReading I have this book; it was my mom‘s book. 4y
26 likes1 stack add8 comments
blurb
IndoorDame
post image

I decided to read this initially because a friend mentioned that she hadn‘t understood most of the references in Between The World And Me until she had previewed this book for her students. I know I‘m not the intended audience for this, but I‘m glad I read it- I feel like I have a piece of American history I was missing now.

27 likes3 stack adds
quote
IndoorDame
post image

“One thing was clear: we had to accept the fact that these principles were worth dying for, and that there were plenty of people who were willing to see us disappear...Dr. King and Dick Gregory became almost fatalistic in accepting the fact that they were dead men and that it was only a matter of time before that fact became a reality.”

19 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
Sweettartlaura
post image
Pickpick

Wow! Read this book! It‘s essential American reading, especially for white Americans. It‘s the most important thing I‘ve read in years.
Full review in the link below...

Read my 5-star review of Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1058591892

quote
Sweettartlaura
post image

1959...
... and yesterday

29 likes1 stack add
review
Dre43
post image
Pickpick

Black Like Me. ... Black Like Me, first published in 1961, is a nonfiction book by white journalist John Howard Griffin recounting his journey in the Deep South of the United States, at a time when African-Americans lived under Racial Segregation.

Must Read Book

quote
Crowcrumbs
post image

“...the most obscene figures are not the ignorant ranting racists, but the legal minds who front for them, who ‘invent‘ for them the legislative proposals and the propaganda bulletins. They deliberately choose to foster distortions, always under the guise of patriotism, upon a people who have no means of checking the facts. “ -1962 J Griffin, Black Like Me

AmyG And also disguised as religion. 😪 5y
Crowcrumbs @AmyG Sadly, that too. 5y
37 likes1 stack add2 comments
blurb
Crowcrumbs
post image

I‘m a little over halfway through and finding this (sadly) as much relevant to today as it is a good history lesson.

rustoryhuf I loved that book. Read it in the mid 1970s. 5y
27 likes2 stack adds1 comment
blurb
DivineDiana
post image

I read this book many years ago but I will never forget the power of this story! A nonfiction book about a white journalist who in 1959 disguised himself as a black man and traveled for six weeks through the South in the United States. #nuyear #hereintheblack

Alfoster Yes! Loved this!😍 5y
Cinfhen Oh, sounds fascinating 5y
TrishB Sounds intriguing! 5y
See All 9 Comments
Sweettartlaura This is on my TBR for this year - can‘t wait! 5y
Izai.Amorim Many decades ago a German writer lived and worked disguised as a Turk and wrote a book about the hardships and discrimination that guest workers ( as they were called then, not immigrants) faced daily. 5y
DivineDiana @Izai.Amorim Thank you for letting me know. Did not know about this one! I find this type of undercover work fascinating ! 5y
75 likes3 stack adds9 comments
review
bookishbitch
post image
Pickpick

If you have any interest in race relations I think this is an important read. The author took a huge risk doing this back in 1959 in the south. I cannot even imagine the courage it took. Even he had no idea the implications it would have, and what he would learn in his experiment. I think it should be required reading in schools even today. It explains quite a bit and some surprising. I miss my military days when we were all just shades of green.

Alfoster Agreed! Still so relevant! 5y
bookishbitch @Alfoster Sadly so. 5y
7 likes2 comments
blurb
SubwayBookReview
post image

Oliver: "It's a dope book. The story takes place in the 50s in the South. A white guy wants to know what's like to be black. He changes the color of his skin and ends up making it so dark that he has an identity crisis. People who used to know him don't recognize him either. He's baffled by it. I read a lot about social justice and the black condition in America. Changing on the outside doesn't change who you are on the inside." #newyork

GeekGrl82 My mom knew his sister. He ended up dying from cancer related to this social experiment. 5y
Jensol77 Dumb question, how did he dye his skin? 5y
83 likes16 stack adds2 comments
review
luvamystery65
Pickpick

Sad to say that this book still reminds me of way too much that is still going on today. We may not have segregation on the law books anymore but racism is still alive and well in 2017. What struck me the most were the passages that quoted racists calling themselves super patriots and Christians when defending their practices.

blurb
estellasrevenge
post image

Now. Now. Now. Read it now. The infuriating part is that so much of this is still true. If I can find some cheap copies I'll be quietly, subversively sharing it with some neighbors on Christmas Eve.

MicheleinPhilly SH***ER'S FULL! 😜 6y
22 likes3 stack adds2 comments
review
JillMoore1226
post image
Pickpick

It has taken me a bit to process this book. It's the best kind of reading...the kind that makes you think and feel deeply. You can read my full review here: https://liveoakreview.net/2016/11/18/black-like-me-by-john-howard-griffin/. ❤️

Alfoster Oh, I loved this one too! 6y
18 likes2 stack adds1 comment
blurb
Riveted_Reader_Melissa
post image

On sale today a classic #wndb #diversitymonday or #diversityfriday #MSM #ManyStoriesMonday on Tuesday because that's when Amazon posted it 👍

KVanRead Love it! 6y
38 likes1 comment
blurb
TyraJ
post image

Finished! The more I read about the past, the more I see it reflected in the present. This was a great book.

Further learning: there are interviews with the writer talking about his experience of "being Black" on YouTube.

blurb
TyraJ
post image

...

blurb
Riveted_Reader_Melissa
post image

As I'm reading the New Jim Crow, I'm finding myself thinking about this book. The first I read 25ish years ago in school that made me question, and thinking as much as I thought things had changed, really we've just renamed them and carried on.

34 likes3 stack adds
blurb
Riveted_Reader_Melissa
post image

A late entry into #DiversityFriday here, but it was the first book for me, from back in JR High, that both shocked & appalled me. It's somewhat outdated & politically incorrect in this day and age, but it did start my journey into questioning what is, and I think it's still a worthwhile read today.

quirkyreader I read this one recently along with some others that were on a library discard pile. I think the other book was by Anne Moody. 6y
quirkyreader The other book was Coming of Age In Mississippi. 6y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @quirkyreader I will definitely look for that one, how did Black Like Me hold up after all these years since you've recently read it? 6y
See All 6 Comments
quirkyreader Many of the things that were written about at that time still hold true today. The big one is being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Getting 6y
quirkyreader Getting pulled over in neighbourhoods where you don't "belong". Or showing up in a restaurant and being made to feel unwelcome. I keep hoping that someday all the distrustfulness and fear will stop. 6y
Riveted_Reader_Melissa @quirkyreader It's been so long since I've read it, but reading the New Jim Crow definitely made me remember it...must mean it's time for a re-read because sadly as much as things have changed the more they've stayed the same. 6y
39 likes1 stack add6 comments
blurb
readsinthegym
post image

"Living is easy with eyes closed." Black Like Me is the story of a man who opened his eyes...

4 likes1 stack add