Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
Solito
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
A young poet tells the unforgettable story of his harrowing migration from El Salvador to the United States at the age of nine in this moving, page-turning memoir hailed as "the mythic journey of our era" (Sandra Cisneros) Trip. My parents started using that word about a year agoone day, youll take a trip to be with us. Like an adventure. Javiers adventure is a three-thousand-mile journey from his small town in El Salvador, through Guatemala and Mexico, and across the U.S. border. He will leave behind his beloved aunt and grandparents to reunite with a mother who left four years ago and a father he barely remembers. Traveling alone except for a group of strangers and a "coyote" hired to lead them to safety, Javiers trip is supposed to last two short weeks. At nine years old, all Javier can imagine is rushing into his parents arms, snuggling in bed between them, living under the same roof again. He does not see the perilous boat trips, relentless desert treks, pointed guns, arrests and deceptions that await him; nor can he know that those two weeks will expand into two life-altering months alongside a group of strangers who will come to encircle him like an unexpected family. A memoir by an acclaimed poet that reads like a novel, Solito not only provides an immediate and intimate account of a treacherous and near-impossible journey, but also the miraculous kindness and love delivered at the most unexpected moments. Solito is Javier's story, but it's also the story of millions of others who had no choice but to leave home.
Amazon Indiebound Barnes and Noble WorldCat Goodreads LibraryThing
Pick icon
100%
blurb
ms.gabourel
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

This quote reminded me of how skillful Zamora's writing is. Despite the gravity of the situation, Javier's childlike wonder continuously peeks through. It is also important to remember that the author was 32 when this book was published, meaning that this childlike mindset was likely quite foreign to him at the time. Despite the age gap between when the story occurred and when it was written, Zamora was still able to tap back in to his childhood.

blurb
ms.gabourel
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I really loved this quote from “Solito“ because it perfectly encapsulates Javier's journey and his evolving sense of family/friendship. Javier grew up with an “untraditional“ family structure as his parents immigrated when he was young. The author's journey of navigating various different familial relationships is reflected in his friendship with “The Four.“ Their journey bound them together as a family, even if their time together was brief.

blurb
ms.gabourel
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

My favorite stylistic choice that Zamora made was blending both English and Spanish language/vernacular. The blend of English and Spanish words/punctuation perfectly represents Zamora's childhood that was torn between El Salvador and America. As someone who speaks both languages, I thought that the specific words that he chose to include in Spanish were super impactful. Some words just have more OOMPH in Spanish.

blurb
ms.gabourel
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

A constant theme that I noticed throughout “Solito: A Memoir“ was food. Food was constantly present and each dish was tied to a certain memory or feeling. Javier and his friends associate pizza with America because of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtled. This gives him yet another thing to look forward to for his journey to America. On the other hand, the first quote illustrates how Javier can associate food, culture, and shame.

blurb
becky_lalaian
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora

There are so many moments in the reading that made me feel emotional or got me thinking, and I marked certain quotes in those scenes that suck out to me. There are many instances where Javier is observant, and I marked a quote in the memoir where he says, “I remember the man in the boat. The Guatemalans on the bus. Strangers, but I remember some of their faces. The wrinkles when one of them cried... I hope everyone is ok. That they're in La USA.“

blurb
becky_lalaian
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora

One thought that I keep grappling with about this memoir is the importance of why Javier writes his experiences that he had as a nine-year-old with such attention to detail. While it's definitely worth the read for us, I think that this memoir is meant to be more than an intriguing read. Javier's telling of his experiences throughout his journey gives un an insight to what he endured, but also to what migration is like for countless others.

blurb
becky_lalaian
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora

As I read, I noticed that among the themes of survival and migration was the theme of family. Even at the age of nine, Javier was able to connect with strangers of different ages because of the perilous journey and experiences that they shared. This just goes to show even further that blood ties aren't always what makes a family. The experiences we share and the bonds we make through those experiences can last a lifetime, as we see with Javier.

review
becky_lalaian
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
Pickpick

I found this book to be really emotional and moving in the way Javier recounts his journey. When I first started reading, I didn't know how the perspective of a nine-year-old would work, but Javier Zamora did an amazing job. I felt like his descriptiveness involving situations and occurrences helped me envision what was happening throughout the novel.

blurb
CassidyCheatwood
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

Overall, this is one of the best books I have ever read, EVER. It is so out of the norm of what I typically read and it has shown me how I can really branch out and love new types of literature. This story is so important and I‘m so glad I could be a small part of Javier Zamora‘s incredible and brave journey. I genuinely never wanted to put it down and I ended up reading it in the span of two days because it was just so easy to be enthralled.

review
kodieleidson
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image
Pickpick

I commented on this in another post that I made, but throughout the book, I felt like I was there through every moment; emotionally and physically. I particularly felt emotional when it came to Javier and his grandfathers relationship.

review
kodieleidson
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image
Pickpick

When I was reading Solito, I noticed something interesting; Zamora was using Spanish punctuation (¿?; !¡). I really enjoyed this as it not only made us aware that they were speaking Spanish, but opened us up to an new way of experiencing a book.

review
kodieleidson
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image
Pickpick

Solito was truly an amazing book to read. I felt every raw emotion from Javier and truly felt like I was experiencing it all beside him. Zamora did an amazing job writing this from the viewpoint of a 9 year old and did it in such a way that I knew not only what was on, but what/how of looked and how it felt for Javier as well. Everything about Javier and how he was written was authentic, genuine, and real to the very end.

blurb
abbytayloryalit
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora

Generally speaking, I liked the book. I found the topic to be very interesting and loved how he incorporated Spanish into the book. However, I am so disappointed that we did not get more information about his reunification with his parents. He talked so much about being excited to get to America and how he imagined his parents‘ house. I was shocked when all we got was “Two shadows appear. At last.” and the note about how he hugged his mom.

CassidyCheatwood I had the same feelings too! I wonder if this is because this was the moment he had wanted for so long and just decided to stay an intimate detail of his personal life, which I totally get. I always want to know more!!! 1w
1 comment
blurb
abbytayloryalit
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora

I was surprised by the scene where Patricia stands up for the men in the group. I knew the six of them had gotten to know one another throughout the trip, but I was shocked that she was willing to sacrifice not only her safety but also Zamora‘s and Carla‘s. If I was in Patricia's situation, I don't know if I would have been able to do the same thing.

blurb
abbytayloryalit
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora

The scene where Zamora splits up from his grandpa broke my heart. While I could not fully understand his feelings, I can relate to him. In addition, I loved seeing his Grandpa‘s personality develop over the first part of the book. I thought it was really interesting to see him go from the quite man who wouldn‘t speak to Zamora while walking him to school to the man who was waiting outside the bathroom so the toilet wouldn‘t drown Zamora.

review
amw40488
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image
Pickpick

What a poignant, touching novel! The bonds formed between Javier and those he met along the way were beautifully explored in this memoir. As interesting as it was to read about the physical journey from El Salvador to America, I think the emotional journey experienced by Javier and the rest of the group was what made this novel especially exceptional.

blurb
abbytayloryalit
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora

In Solito, I liked how Zamora was able to include the perspectives he had as a child. I think it would have been easy to write the book in retrospect given the information he has now. However, he was able to portray the limited perspective and knowledge he had about America when he was a child. A primary example of this is when he mentions how he wants to lay with his parents but noted the need for a mosquito net over the bed.

blurb
kristinsmoyer
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

By the end of this book, Javiercito creates another family. It made me think of how those who support us through life and engage in the struggle of life with us become family. When Patricia, Carla, and Chino leave, he thinks of how they are the only ones who will ever fully understand his experience. Though their time together was short and their leaving compared to the fleeting nature of a dream, he knows they have left a lifelong impact.

abbytayloryalit Hi Kristen! I agree. The moment I realized that this group was more than just a group was when Patricia sacrificed her and the kids' safety in order to stand up for the men when their papers were being questioned. Her actions showed that they were more than acquaintances. 1w
1 comment
blurb
CassidyCheatwood
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

One of the most touching moments to me in the book was when Javier realizes he loves his grandfather, and his grandfather loves him, after spending two weeks with him, seeing his real side. I feel like a realization like this is more common with parents in books and movies, so I really felt gravitated towards it when I‘ve felt a similar way with my grandfather.

abbytayloryalit Hi Cassidy! I thought about the same thing when reading this novel. I loved seeing how his grandpa went from being the man who silently walked him to school to being the person who waited outside the bathroom so the toilet wouldn't swallow Javier. The transformation was so cool! 1w
1 comment
review
Alexa_Cussans
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image
Pickpick

Solito was a very good book! I found it to be investing from beginning to end! I think Javier Zamora does a great job conveying his past emotions through his simple descriptions, detailed imagery, and internal monologue. I also really liked how he explored his relationships and how they shifted throughout his life, like the bond he had with his grandfather. I recommend this book to anyone looking for an emotional read.

blurb
kristinsmoyer
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

Zamora‘s story being told from the perspective of his nine year old self allows the reader to live vicariously through Javiercito. If the story were a reflection told from his adult perspective, the reader wouldn‘t be able to understand the experience as well on a personal level. Rather than use lots of facts or explanations, Zamora chooses to use succinct, observational phrases that highlight the uncertainty he experienced.

blurb
kristinsmoyer
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I thought Zamora did an excellent job at using figurative language to convey certain sensations or ideas throughout the book. For example, Javier really wants to express something but instead “swallows” the thought “like a big gulp of cough syrup” (40). He also describes everything in the desert as “having a fever” which helped me imagine how the desert air and landscape must have felt (202).

review
DanyYnad
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image
Pickpick

This book was an incredible display of an experience that we know so much so little of. I loved reading Zamora‘s work and all the details he includes in them. The nuances of the issues in Latino culture with machismo, colorism, and issues of immigration all are shown through the eyes of a young child which makes it all the more impactful.

kristinsmoyer I love how you mentioned his experience is something we as readers know so little of! There isn‘t much literature that depicts the immigration experience, so reading this opened up something rather mysterious and made it feel personal. 1w
kodieleidson The mention of this experience being something we know so little about it not only true but impactful! I feel we don‘t always realize or understand just how little literature there is about immigration and the experience of it all. 1w
kodieleidson The mention of this experience being something we know so little about it not only true but impactful! I feel we don‘t always realize or understand just how little literature there is about immigration and the experience of it all. 1w
abbytayloryalit I think you are so right. I think in today's society there are so many negative connotations surrounding immigration which limits the platform where these people can tell their stories. In addition, your post made me wonder about how Javier's experience would have been different if he had been an adult during the process. 1w
1 like4 comments
quote
Alexa_Cussans
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I really enjoyed this quote in the book. I think this depicts Javier‘s relationship with his grandfather perfectly. I like how it develops and causes Javier to miss and even depend on his grandfather he was once afraid of.

blurb
sarabeth_gant
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

Throughout the memoir, Javier wonders about family. His family in El Salvador, his parents in California, and his fake family in The Six, then The Four. Strangers become family, but what is incredible to me is that those family never become strangers. Even those who he traveled with, with whom he lost touch with - Patricia, Carla, and Chino - he still wants to have a relationship with and thinks of them fondly.

kristinsmoyer I thought this book was a great depiction of the human desire and need for familial connection. (edited) 1w
kodieleidson I really loved how important Zamora makes familial connection in this book! He showcased it in such a way that was really impactful! 1w
2 comments
blurb
sarabeth_gant
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora

I had no idea what was awaiting Javier in the U.S. At first, I thought the whole point of the book was to tell about his new home with his parents, but Zamora surprised me. I never realized how difficult it is and how long it takes to migrate to another country, and that, I believe, is the one of the reasons Zamora shared his story.

amw40488 I agree! I also really enjoyed how Zamora put such an emphasis on the journey instead of just skipping to the destination. Javier's reunion with his parents was the whole reason for the journey, but his relationships with Patricia, Carla, and Chino were what pushed him to that finish line during such a treacherous time. 1w
1 comment
blurb
sarabeth_gant
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

There are several times in this book in which I'm surprised at the style. Zamora is clearly a good writer, as he uses different tools throughout the book, such as multiple sentence structures. In chapter 3, when Zamora is recalling his travel on the boat, he uses very short sentence structure to highlight detail. Not only that, but it also demonstrates his continuously changing moods. He does this also to show his overwhelming emotions.

blurb
sofiajurado
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

Overall, I really enjoyed this memoir. It's important to see firsthand accounts of how people escape dangerous situations in their home country to seek safety and opportunities in the US, especially children who have to leave their families behind at such a young and vulnerable age. It hopefully allows non-immigrants and non-Hispanics to sympathize and understand their very real, heartbreaking, and human struggle.

sarabeth_gant I love the way you mentioned the overall human struggle. One particular struggle that comes to mind is in the beginning, in which Javier's obvious choice to live with his parents, and at the same time, leave his grandparents and the place he called home. It is so human for him to be so excited to see his mom and dad -- so excited that he doesn't fully realize that he may never see his other family again. Truly, an incredible book. 2w
abbytayloryalit I completely agree. I think some people have a habit of demonizing immigrants instead of offering them sympathy. Like you mentioned, I believe this book does a great job of highlighting the struggle that these individuals endured instead of meeting them with criticism. 1w
ms.gabourel I agree! I think that reading this book could be a great exercise in empathy for many. Particularly because Javier was so young when the story took place. I love that the story is a memoir and not fictional, it makes each detail more impactful! 1w
2 likes3 comments
blurb
amw40488
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

Something that I‘ve found intriguing is the repetition of Javier‘s inner-thoughts (i.e., cadejo, the stars, the silver toliet, etc.). To me, these repeated thoughts/images give Javier something to cling to during such a tumultuous time in his life; they keep him sort of grounded in reality, but also allow him to feel hopeful for what‘s to come. These repeated thoughts seem to act as an escape, and it‘s neat to witness his thoughts in this way.

AriaBlue I agree. Javier's thoughts are what make the story interesting. It was amazing to see how he got through the journey with everything he had gone through. 1w
becky_lalaian I agree with you about Javier's thoughts throughout the memoir. I think that the expectations and hope for what's to come is definitely a big part of what kept Javier going during his journey. 1w
2 comments
blurb
sofiajurado
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
This post contains spoilers
show me
post image

I really loved the scenes where Javier says goodbye to Grandpa and Chino, Patricia, and Carla. They were so heartbreaking to read, but they also were reflective of the ways Javier grew up. Javier sees a new side to his grandfather-- the family he was born with-- and has to say goodbye. He then later does the same with his second family-- the one he chose and made throughout his journey.

amw40488 It must have been so difficult for someone so young to experience such lose. Javier's found families were all he had at times, and I can't imagine how painful it must have been to say goodbye to such impactful people! 1w
1 comment
blurb
sofiajurado
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

It's interesting how language plays a role in this memoir. Javier is so young when he migrates, and he lived an arguably sheltered life before he left. Scenes, where certain sentences or phrases are written in untranslated Spanish, broken English, or where Javier uses the wrong dialect of Spanish, stood out to me the most. The constant anxiety about being caught and the unpredictability of their situation in the eyes of a child are amplified.

kristinsmoyer I thought Zamora did great at expressing the emotion of uncertainty, especially by using succinct, quick, verbal based language. 1w
1 comment
blurb
AriaBlue
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

This book is amazing! I enjoyed reading about the adventures of Javier as he ventured through different countries to get to the US. What stood out to me the most throughout this whole book was the fact that was an unaccompanied minor. The reason being is when I would travel I would see unaccompanied minors and I used to wonder what it was like traveling as an unaccompanied minor and this story gave me insight about the situation through Javier.

blurb
DanyYnad
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

Zamora really puts in great details to bring the readers straight into the story and into his perspective in his experiences. The misspelling to reflect the broken Spanish spoken by the guards is such a brilliant way to show how young Zamora is having to understand them in the midst of such panic, confusion, and fear. The way that Patricia, Clara, and Chino became a family really hit me hard especially in this scene.

AriaBlue Hello Dany. I agree that Javier does a great job with attention to details in the book. Javier struggle throughout his journey to the US. Being young awhile traveling alone can be stressful and takes courage. His story is interesting. 2w
1 comment
blurb
DanyYnad
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

The feelings that this scene brought to me were heavy. The panic that sets as everything goes so fast and so slow and everything comes to conclude. I felt this panic while reading and the heavy feeling afterwards sat with me as I kept going with my reading.

blurb
DanyYnad
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I appreciate the inclusions of Spanish punctuation and words throughout the story and how they are sometimes explained and sometimes not. As a Spanish speaker, it‘s nice to see familiar words my family or friends use and understand the severity of them. I‘d imagine for non-Spanish speakers it‘s a reflection of how Zamora endured his time listening to and reading a language he had no knowledge or explanation of.

blurb
DanyYnad
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I love the subtle ways that Zamora reminds us of just how young he is throughout the book. Throughout his journey he‘s still learning new words in his own language and newer slang far from the one he knows from home. He‘s still a child learning about the world he recognizes and he‘s going into a completely new world where everything will be new. Zamora showing us these glimpses of his naivety puts into perspective how immense of a journey this is.

blurb
ms.reagan
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

The main thing I thoroughly enjoyed was how this book makes you connect to all the different characters. The narration prospers emotional connections to where the reader is invested in the characters journeys and feels emotions as they do. Zamora brilliantly entrances the reader and keeps you on the edge of your seat, waiting for the next twist or turn in his personal journey. Needless to say, I loved it!

blurb
Alexa_Cussans
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
This post contains spoilers
show me
post image

I really like the end of chapter five. Here, Javier and Patricia have a conversation about their families in America. This scene is very intimate and I found Patricia playing a maternal role by comforting Javier while remaining stern. I believe that she is symbolic of the hope Javier has, being a positive figure in one of his darkest hours.

CassidyCheatwood I loved this moment too!!! 2w
1 like1 comment
blurb
Alexa_Cussans
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I really liked chapter two of this novel! I found Zamora‘s relationship with his grandfather to be really interesting! For instance, throughout this chapter, Zamora‘s internal monologue constantly changes when he interacts with his grandpa. By the end of the chapter, his perspective of his grandfather completely changes and causes him to feel sad when he finally has to leave. I think lots of people can relate to this kind of relationship.

sarabeth_gant YES - I love the relationship change with his grandfather. One of my favorite things about this memoir is Zamora's ability to keep changes in the characters' relationships a secret until the reader realizes how MUCH a relationship has changed. It's like he is literally focusing on every moment and how he felt toward certain people in that very moment. 2w
1 like1 comment
blurb
ms.reagan
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I love the persistent image of the Cabejo guardian that Javier keeps looking for, but at this point, I believe that Chino and Marcelo are his metaphorical Cabejos. His grandfather mentioned that he should look out for red eyes (the marking of a cabejo) and interestingly enough, Chino\Marcelo‘s cigarettes are always mentioned to form “red eyes” in the night. I‘m not sure if this is a correct correlation, but it‘s interesting to think about!

AriaBlue Wow, I never thought about how cigarettes are always mentioned! 6d
1 comment
blurb
Alexa_Cussans
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I really like the use of Spanish punctuation in this novel (ex: ¿?). I not only found this to be an interesting reminder to the audience that the characters aren‘t actually speaking English, but it can also be used as a helpful tool for bilingual classrooms. By using Spanish punctuation, readers whose first language is Spanish could have an easier time understanding the text.

colby_reads I also found this to be very interesting as well as effective throughout the novel. 2w
kodieleidson I also really loved the usage of Spanish punctuation in the novel! It really added to the overall tone of the book as well as remind us of the language that is being spoken during this! 1w
ms.gabourel I also love the use of Spanish punctuation and language throughout the novel. I think it emphasizes the blend of the two cultures Zamora has been exposed to. Funnily enough, I listened to the book on audible so I had no idea that this punctuation was used until I looked at the ebook to gather quotes! 1w
1 like3 comments
quote
amw40488
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
This post contains spoilers
show me
post image

This journey that Javier and the rest of The Six are on is dangerous, lonely, and disheartening, evidenced by the above quote. There are so many unknown and unanticipated factors that are working against the Six, and yet, they persevere. Their courage is exemplary, and I am enjoying reading about how they navigate this rocky terrain.

blurb
Laurenwhite0508
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I read an interview from Feb. 2024 with Javier Zamora that said he has never been reunited with Patricia, Carla, and Chino, but that he has also turned down many opportunities to search for them. He doesn't want to force them to relive their trauma and they might remember their stories very differently. I thought that this was very interesting because I was curious if he was ever reunited with them.

ms.miranda_readsbooks Hey Lauren! He also mentions not reuniting with Patricia, Carla, and Chino in the epilogue and I was really curious as to why he didn't decide to try to find them. You just answered that! It totally makes sense that he doesn't want to make them relive their trauma. I'm really glad you mentioned an interview with him. I wonder if any of them have read or heard of the book and what they think about it. 2w
sofiajurado This is so interesting to see, I had no idea! It makes sense that he wouldn't want to force them into reliving what they went through, but it's also a little shocking that he turned down opportunities to see them again after hoping that they would all reconnect at some point. 2w
2 likes2 comments
blurb
Laurenwhite0508
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I find Javier's relationship with his grandfather to be particularly interesting. He is much closer to his Grandmother and aunts, but his grandfather seems to have stepped into a new role after Javier's parents left him. He stopped drinking, and although he does not often come across as especially kind, it is evident that he loves Javier when they have to separate.

DanyYnad Hi Lauren! It was really interesting to see the development of their relationship especially as he goes to leave Javier and it is tragic to see how vulnerable he became at the very end when saying goodbye and knowing that their relationship is forever changed. 2w
1 comment
blurb
Laurenwhite0508
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

I find it interesting how sheltered Javier describes his life as before he leaves on his trip to the U.S. It seems like the author is making an attempt to emphasize how important it is that he is separated from his parents. While life in El Salvador was not perfect, it appears that Javier was doing okay there. It seems like the author is making a statement on how difficult it is for children to be separated from their parents, specifically.

Alexa_Cussans @Laurenwhite0508 I really like this idea! I didn‘t really pay attention to the fact that he had a sheltered childhood. I think he did do this intentionally though to emphasize how isolated he felt without his parents. 2w
1 like1 comment
blurb
kristinsmoyer
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

…Javier realizes his grandpa is much more nuanced than he thought. His grandpa‘s past remains somewhat mysterious but begins to reveal itself; the reader can‘t help wonder how his alcoholism, career as an officer, failed marriage, and childhood have affected him. Before parting ways, it is clear the abuelo loves Javier, and his teary eyes and long hugs show a softer side beneath his hard exterior. This part particularly touched me.

ms.miranda_readsbooks Hi Kristin! I also really loved the part of the story where Javier bonds with his grandpa. It was really touching (I'm gonna be honest it did make me cry.) It also really reminded me of something called machismo that is present in many hispanic cultures. I think seeing how Javier's grandpa cared for him in his own ways was such a good way to show different people show love, and how love does not have to be said with words. 2w
1 like1 comment
blurb
kristinsmoyer
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

Javier‘s relationship with his abuelo particularly interested me, as I think his abuelo is a good representation of a round character. There are moments throughout the story when Javier has traumatic flashbacks of his grandpa abusing his abuelita and mother. These memories seem to make Javier hesitant in his interactions with his abuelo. However, after spending more time together in the immigration process, Javier realizes…(refer to next post).

colby_reads Hey Kristin I noticed this as well and also thought it to be very interesting! 2w
1 comment
blurb
CassidyCheatwood
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
This post contains spoilers
show me
post image

I don‘t know if you guys feel the emotions from the book like I do, but when they got pulled out of the bus…. I was actually sweating. I was so nervous for all of them. And the boat ride also made me so nervous for them. It feels a little silly how reading can make my emotions actually physically play out (I‘m telling you, actually sweating) but it‘s actually so cool to me that a book can do that to you.

amw40488 I felt that anxiety as well! Their whole journey has felt nerve-wracking to me as a reader, but this part was a sharp reminder of just how dangerous and isolating their situation is. 2w
ms.miranda_readsbooks Hi Cassidy! I also felt major emotions reading this book. I cried a lot 😭 but I think that was one of my favorite parts of the book. It is such an emotional take on an issue that many people tend to try to squish into little boxes of black and white thinking. 2w
Alexa_Cussans Hi Cassidy! I also felt really anxious reading the boat scene. I think Javier Zamora does a great job conveying his emotions, causing his audience to empathize with him. When I read the boat scene, I felt his fear and began to panic with him. 2w
1 like3 comments
blurb
Laurenwhite0508
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

So far I am really enjoying this memoir. An important detail of the writing style in this book is that the author throws in Spanish punctuation and words sometimes in the novel. I think that this is a reminder that Javier speaks only in Spanish in the beginning parts of the novel.

Alexa_Cussans Hi Lauren! I also really liked the use of Spanish punctuations! I agree that he uses this as a tool to remind the audience that he isn‘t speaking English, but I also think he‘s trying to make his text accessible to native Spanish speakers too. 2w
1 comment
blurb
sarabeth_gant
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
post image

From Chapter 1

I like the way Zamora combines memories with current feelings. For example, here, he speaks about his mother in a photo. He remembers the way she used to be and the way she seems to be now. This happens throughout the book because all the time, he‘s thinking about his mom and dad. He doesn‘t have much to remember, but he holds on to what he does remember.

CassidyCheatwood I think this really shows Javier‘s personality. Throughout his journey, his POVs and opinions on The Six‘s adults change a lot. One minute he thinks they‘re mean, then they actually care for him. It‘s back and forth and I think it contrasts with his view of his mom. She stays a constant since she is so far away. 2w
ms.miranda_readsbooks HI Sarabeth! I also really loved the way Zamora uses memory and nostalgia throughout the story. I think it just really makes him so much more relatable which really highlights why diverse YA lit is so important. There are so many people who can relate to the feeling of trying to hold onto the little memories we have with things we were only able to love for a short time. 2w
2 likes2 comments