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amw40488

amw40488

Joined June 2024

YA Lit :)
blurb
amw40488

Slater writes that “guilt focuses on the behavior [while] shame focuses on the person“ (pg. 248). In Part 8, things went from bad to worse when the protesters reverted to shaming the account followers rather than making them feel guilty for their actions. By focusing on shaming, the protesters inadvertently hindered any productive dialogue or potential for change, which further deepened the divide between the followers and the protesters.

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amw40488
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I think this line from Part 3 serves as a basis for why the account followers' actions were harmful, no matter how involved in the account they were. By simply following the deeply racist account, they inadvertently endorsed its harmful agenda and contributed to the normalization and spread of racist attitudes and beliefs. Their complicity, whether deliberate or not, makes them accountable for the impact of the account's messaging.

AriaBlue I agree that the term “racism” does hold racist people accountable and they need to be held responsible for their actions. (edited) 3d
1 like1 comment
review
amw40488
Icebreaker | Hannah Grace
Mehso-so

I would definitely not suggest this novel to a young adult reader, but there are aspects of Nathan and Anastasia's story that could be used as learning moments for older readers. Hannah Grace, in my opinion, did a great job writing about the complexity of relationships--both platonic and romantic--and a number of other delicate topics. Not a YA book, but still enjoyable!

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amw40488
Icebreaker | Hannah Grace

I think this novel did a really good job of broaching the subject of toxic relationships. It was difficult to read about the main character Anastasia's struggles with her manipulative skating partner, Aaron, and how his toxicity affected her health and well-being, but I think the author was very respectful in how she wrote about the situation.

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amw40488
Icebreaker | Hannah Grace

One thing I appreciate about this novel is how it tackled conflict resolution and communication. Though the main characters are young and in college, they are mature in how they work out most of their conflicts by being open and honest about how/what they are feeling. As someone who reads a lot of romance novels, I would say that this novel has one of the best representations of a healthy, communicative relationship I have read recently.

review
amw40488
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Pickpick

I think there were a lot of good lessons to learn from this book. The above paragraph stood out to me a lot because social media isn't going away anytime soon, but there are ways to control and regulate how we use it. It's up to each individual user to decide what their media consumption will look like, and this approach outlined by Yasmin seems like a good starting place for anyone looking to change their habits.

abbytayloryalit I loved this paragraph because I feel like social media consumption isn't one size fits all. There are going to be people who aren't affected by social media and others who are heavily influenced by it. Everyone needs to assess how they are affected by it rather than listen to other people tell them how they should feel about it. 6d
kristinsmoyer This is so funny! I haven‘t even read this part of the book yet, but the other day I had an idea to keep a journal of how social media makes me feel on a daily basis! So interesting! Limiting time honestly helps me feel so much more refreshed! 6d
1 like2 comments
blurb
amw40488

Yasmin's discussion of objectivity and neutrality was very well done, in my opinion. Being completely impartial regarding topics such as politics, climate change, gender issues, etc. is pretty much impossible, no matter how hard someone might try to stay open-minded to all sides of an issue. Personal biases prevent true neutrality from becoming tangible, especially in the realm of journalism.

abbyleap I agree with you! She brings up a lot of good points about the way that people feel about things/interact with each other, in general, but I think she does an especially good job here! 6d
1 comment
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amw40488

Just finished Chapter 3! I was pleasantly surprised by the timeline of American journalism; truthfully, I had no clue it dated back to BCE. I also really enjoyed how Yasmin discussed the issue of narrative framing and how framing can affect the exposure that an issue receives. Who tells a story is so important; an author's credibility and the way they frame a story can completely change how we perceive an issue, and I think that's very powerful.

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amw40488
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I am learning so much from this book already! I thought I knew a lot about misinformation and “fake news“ before reading this, but this book is proving that there is so much more to the issue of false information than meets the eye. I'm almost overwhelmed by how much I've learned from the first chapter alone, but Yasmin has done a good job of dissecting certain topics in a way that is approachable and easy to read, especially for younger readers.

Alexa_Cussans I also learned a lot about misinformation in the first chapter! Before I read it, I had an idea on what fake news was, but I feel more informed on the topic after reading this book. 1w
AriaBlue Yes right off the bat chapter 1 is loaded with information about misinformation. 1w
1 like2 comments
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amw40488
Icebreaker | Hannah Grace
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I think it‘s safe to say that this novel should not be on a YA book list! I would not recommend this to anyone under the age of 18 as it features a lot of sexually explicit content. I would label this book as a new adult or adult novel. All that aside, I think this is a really enjoyable book so far. It seems to feature a cast of fun, diverse characters and has already touched on subjects like consent, disordered eating, and toxic relationships.

sarabeth_donaldson It‘s interesting that you point out the age group of the audience of this book. I think this is one of the debates in deciding what students should read, and at what grade levels. Even if students don‘t read this as a class, do you think it would be appropriate for a teacher to have it in their classroom for students to pick up at any time? 1w
TheBookHippie @sarabeth_donaldson it‘s in our high school library. I don‘t find it any different than all the middle and high school girls reading COHO (Colleen Hoover) or countless many others. But I‘m waaay more lax on this than most people. It‘s listed as most loved book for 8th & 9th graders 😅in our book poll at school. 🤷🏻‍♀️ 1w
Alexa_Cussans I was super shocked to find this book on the YA reading list! I haven‘t read it, but I‘ve heard it‘s super mature. I agree with your opinion on it being considered adult instead of YA. 1w
3 likes3 comments
review
amw40488
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Pickpick

I liked how Lo portrayed the Telegraph Club in this novel; it was one of the few places where Lily, and many individuals like her, could be her most authentic self without shame. I think it is important for young readers to read this novel and understand that no matter where they are in the world, they should also be free to exist as their most authentic selves, just like Lily did at this club (and with Kath).

CassidyCheatwood I do also! I love the idea of having a “safe place” and I think that‘s really relatable for a lot of people in the world; although, it is terrible how it‘s not always safe to be yourself in various places of the world. 2w
amw40488 @CassidyCheatwood Agreed—it is really terrible! Not to mention that the club eventually became an unsafe place for Lily and a lot of other people because of the police raid. 2w
CassidyCheatwood @amw40488 I know. And even people being safe places, like Kath, but Shirley eventually not. 2w
2 likes3 comments
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amw40488
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Lily was a such a well-written teen-aged character, in my opinion. Despite this novel taking place in the 50s, Lily still struggled with things that high schoolers today struggle with--things like sexuality, friendships, aspirations/careers, familial dynamics, etc. Lily struggled, but she also persevered and found ways to live a life that she wanted. For this, I think this novel is very well-suited for young readers who may relate to Lily.

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amw40488
Pickpick

I really enjoyed how this novel navigated Lily's feelings. Her struggle with her sexual identity was obviously a key factor of the novel, but the cultural and familial expectations placed upon her were also important to Lily's personal development. The hardships Lily endured in a time period defined by conformity was interesting to read, and it made this novel very captivating.

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amw40488

I‘m about 100 pages into the novel, and so far, I‘m really enjoying its historical context. To be completely frank, I was never taught about the Red Scare in any of my history classes, so it‘s been really interesting to learn more about it through this novel. I am also really enjoying the descriptions of Chinatown through Lily‘s eyes; the imagery helps center this novel in both its historical and geographical setting. Excited for more!

review
amw40488
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Pickpick

Faerry's tattoos are really intriguing to me. Not only do his self-inflicted scars serve as a kind of tattoo, but his actual tattoos (like the apple, the corpse flower, etc.) give us clues regarding the fairytales that he and Whimsy will come across in their journey through Sorrow's Garden. All of Faerry's physical marks are symbols of his physical and mental battles with depression. These were small but very meaningful details, in my opinion!

abbyleap I agree with you! The book is absolutely jam-packed with various bits of symbology, and I loved Faerry's tattoos! They're just one of those great little subtle details that really struck me as I was reading the book. 4w
ms.miranda_readsbooks I also thought the floral symbolism throughout the story was really interesting. Not only Faerry's tattoes, but the beginning of the chapters in part two each have a different flower. I really liked how it really subtly connected Whimsy to hoodoo and her identity as a conjurer 3w
1 like2 comments
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amw40488
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Part 2, Chapter 9 was so beautifully written, but so gut-wrenching and emotional. Whimsy and Faerry's encounter with Sorrow painted a poignant picture of the self-doubt and inner demons that Whimsy and Faerry struggle against. This chapter handled their depression very well, and though it was tough to read because of the heaviness of the topic, I think McBride broached the topic with great respect and sensitivity. Very good writing!

abbyleap I agree with you! The symbolism and metaphors were poignant, and McBride's writing style really reflected that. Perfect tone to match the contents of the story. 4w
sarabeth_donaldson I also greatly appreciate McBride‘s note about her personal experience with depression. It gives her a ton of credibility, and her writing this story was obviously a way for her to help cope with her trauma. It‘s a good demonstration to students of how impactful writing can be. 3w
1 like2 comments
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amw40488
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Not only is the writing style of this novel very interesting, but I am also captivated by how Whimsy processes her thoughts--even the thoughts she can't vividly recall. We experience the same gaps in her memories as she does, which is a fun experience as a reader. Being in her head also helps to make sense of how her depression affects the way she views the world and how it may tinge her memories of the Forest/Garden in certain ways.

abbyleap I really loved the loss of memory as well! One of the symptoms of depression is literally memory loss, so it felt so important that that was acknowledged as one of the symptoms that Whimsy was struggling with. 4w
Laurenwhite0508 I have also been very intrigued by this detail of the writing. It seems like the window that readers have into Whimsy's brain is far more up close than other novels that I would compare it to. I really like how this introduces a new perspective for readers. 3w
1 like2 comments
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amw40488
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About halfway done with this novel! So far, I am finding myself most intrigued by the vivid imagery and the style of writing. The imagery is setting up a really interesting world within the novel, and I'm enjoying the exploration into Whimsy's mind. The style of writing makes this novel's world feel sort of hazy and dreamlike, which I think fits with the illusiveness of the Forest. Excited to read more!

Laurenwhite0508 I completely agree! I think that this is a great book to put in the hands of someone who is newer/ not super interested in reading, based on this! 3w
kristinsmoyer I agree about the book feeling dreamlike! Seems like a crazy dream I‘d have at night haha! Made me think of surrealism. 3w
2 likes2 comments
review
amw40488
Pickpick

There were so many unique stories in this anthology that I particularly enjoyed. “Seventy-Six Dollars and Forty-Nine Cents“ was fun in its method of story-telling and the story's concept. “Secret Samantha“ and “Flying Lessons“ were interesting for their portrayal of youthful hesitance and curiosity regarding friendships/relationships. All in all, this was a very enjoyable read!

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amw40488
Pickpick

I think this compilation of stories is very well-suited for middle school readers! I think it helped that the narrators in these stories were of middle school age, so it felt like these were stories and characters that young readers could really connect to. I am curious and excited to find more books like this one to recommend to younger readers!

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amw40488
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Started my reading day with ‘Secret Samantha‘ and ended it with ‘Main Street.‘ I‘m really enjoying the narration in each of these short stories; each seems to capture both the innocence and the maturity that comes with being a young teen. Although these stories are mostly light-hearted, I also appreciate their depth and how they approach tougher subjects, especially in ‘Main Street‘ and ‘The Beans and Rice Chronicles of Isaiah Dunn.‘

Alexa_Cussans I also liked how some of the stories tackle sensitive topics in a digestible way! I personally really liked “the beans and rice chronicles of Isaiah Dunn.” 1mo
2 likes1 comment
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amw40488
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I've listened to the first three short stories in this anthology via audiobook, and so far, I am really enjoying the uniqueness of the stories. Each story seems to have an overarching theme/lesson, showcased through diverse perspectives. Though these stories are short, they are still impactful and shine a light on various multicultural experiences!

abbyleap I agree! I really appreciated the diverse and multicultural perspectives that this book offered! 1mo
1 like1 comment
review
amw40488
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
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Pickpick

What a poignant, touching novel! The bonds formed between Javier and those he met along the way were beautifully explored in this memoir. As interesting as it was to read about the physical journey from El Salvador to America, I think the emotional journey experienced by Javier and the rest of the group was what made this novel especially exceptional.

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amw40488
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
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Something that I‘ve found intriguing is the repetition of Javier‘s inner-thoughts (i.e., cadejo, the stars, the silver toliet, etc.). To me, these repeated thoughts/images give Javier something to cling to during such a tumultuous time in his life; they keep him sort of grounded in reality, but also allow him to feel hopeful for what‘s to come. These repeated thoughts seem to act as an escape, and it‘s neat to witness his thoughts in this way.

AriaBlue I agree. Javier's thoughts are what make the story interesting. It was amazing to see how he got through the journey with everything he had gone through. 1mo
becky_lalaian I agree with you about Javier's thoughts throughout the memoir. I think that the expectations and hope for what's to come is definitely a big part of what kept Javier going during his journey. 1mo
2 comments
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amw40488
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
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This journey that Javier and the rest of The Six are on is dangerous, lonely, and disheartening, evidenced by the above quote. There are so many unknown and unanticipated factors that are working against the Six, and yet, they persevere. Their courage is exemplary, and I am enjoying reading about how they navigate this rocky terrain.

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amw40488
Solito: A Memoir | Javier Zamora
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This is turning out to be a very interesting memoir so far. As someone who has never been to Central America, the descriptions of the sights and scenes are very striking to me. I am also enjoying how the relationship between Javier and his grandfather is described and how they have developed a rapport in their time together away from home. I'm eager to read more!

abbyleap I agree!! I think the relationships between Javier and the various adults in his life are incredibly striking--and the heart of the novel--so seeing the relationship between him and and his grandfather grow is an interesting feature 1mo
ms.reagan I loved seeing Javier and his grandfather grow closer-they really developed a close bond over their short time alone together. It really shows that the length of relationships doesn‘t impact how deep they can be! 1mo
Laurenwhite0508 I also found the descriptions of El Salvador to be very interesting in the novel! The author does a great job of subtly alluding to differences between El Salvador and the U.S. which add to the uncertainty of Javier's journey. 1mo
3 comments