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Things I've Been Silent About
Things I've Been Silent About: Memories of a Prodigal Daughter | Azar Nafisi
9 posts | 12 read | 16 to read
A memoir offers a portrait of the author's family and childhood in Iran, centered around her powerful mother and her manipulative fictions about herself, as she reflects on women's choices and her own struggle to free herself from her mother's influence.
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feminismandyoga
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Pickpick

This is an amazing book! Nafisi talks about those things all families prefer to keep within the family. She very specifically does this in recognition of the way women and children can only be victimized in this way when families dont talk, don't seek help, prefer not to air it out for justice, and dont even warn each other out of shame that this or that family member is actually a predator.
This belongs on the read list of feminist book clubs.

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BekaReid
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"Novels are about life, they embrace all aspects of existence."

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BekaReid
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Pickpick

I read Reading Lolita in Tehran years ago and was excited to find Nafisi's memoir - a beautiful, compelling exploration of how our experiences and our families shape us as we learn to cope with the fragility of our mundane existence and come to the realization that all the things that give a sense of self and identity can be broken and taken away. We are constantly evolving and fumbling with the fragmented nature of life.

ephemeralwaltz Great review! 7mo
ephemeralwaltz I'm looking forward to reading her work. 7mo
BekaReid @ephemeralwaltz thank you! There was so much in this book (as indicated by the number of tab markers I used!) And even though my experience was quite different, I kept recognizing myself in the pages. 7mo
12 likes3 comments
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BekaReid
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Glad for some lunchtime reading as I finally get back to this book. I like how Azar Nafisi reflects on the difference between living through a historical moment and reflecting on it's aftermath. Food for thought.

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ShannonOffDuty
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Pickpick

Another good one by Nafisi. Pre and Post revolutionary life in Iran is both fascinating and disturbing to me. Wonderful proof that a progressive mind can find a way to overcome oppression. This book is sad and beautiful.

Suet624 I like your review better than mine. 😁 You're right. 3y
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Suet624
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Mehso-so

Her mother was a puzzle and full of contradictions. A woman who insisted she was a victim while annoying and terrorizing others. And yet she had a strength that was kind of awesome. Her father, a piece of work as well. If you're interested in Iran's history and a perplexing family dynamic, this book might satisfy.

TheBookHippie I agree ! I had the same thoughts reading it. I found it fascinating . 3y
Suet624 @TheBookHippie I may go back and give it a "pick" rating later. I think my feelings about the book revolved more around the parenting and not the actual book. ? (edited) 3y
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Suet624
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In fact, she [the author's mother] took a certain pleasure in having me there. Her anger was of the type that needed a constant audience. It thrived on demonstration.

Betty Knowing what the blurb and what you wrote about the mother...the eyes creep me out in the photo 3y
Betty Ugh, and one thumb semi-digging into daughter's arm 3y
Hollie That photo and description reminds me of my grandmother, who is a psycho, I'm going to have to read this book! 3y
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Leelee.reads The way the mom is gripping the daughter's arms and literally caging her in - and the look in the eyes! Yikes. 3y
Librariana That photo screams a very uncomfortable "possession" to me. Like... "this is/you are mine." It screams controlling, manipulative, restricting. Sounds like it was an emotionally-draining mother-daughter relationship fraught with difficulty. Agree with @Leelee.reads - yikes! 3y
Suet624 @Betty, yes, you've caught the creepiness... 3y
Suet624 @Leelee.reads @Hollie this mother is intense. She perceives herself as a victim and yet she victimizes her daughter in so many ways. (edited) 3y
Suet624 @librariana, you are absolutely correct. This mother continues to astonish as I read more of the book. 3y
Hobbinol Wow! How intense and fascinating at the same time! 3y
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Suet624
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As it turns out I just HAD to stop at the library after visiting the doctor this morning. While knitting is still in my plans for the day, this book by the author of Reading Lolita in Tehran grabbed my attention and has been added to my stack of library books to be read.

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Bree.Hill
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Recent Non-Fiction read I hauled. What's the most recent piece of nonfiction you've hauled?

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