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eve

eveVerified

Joined June 2016

secret Narnian. Library elf. author of 1919 & Electric Arches (Haymarket), Ghosts in the Schoolyard (UChicago Press), and Ironheart (Marvel).
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The Water Dancer: A Novel by Ta-Nehisi Coates
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Selected Poems 1988-2013 by Seamus Heaney
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The Best American Food Writing 2018 by Ruth Reichl, Silvia Killingsworth
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eve
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“But burning was their fate; they were the generation meant to be consumed by fire.” in Kentucky for spring break and my brother-in-law put me on but I been wanted to read this anyway. won‘t have time to finish this trip but it‘s good and I‘m motivated to get a copy when I get home! Sci-fi set against the backdrop of the Cultural Revolution, which I also want to now learn more about.

Anton I remember really liking the early parts during the Cultural Revolution, but I struggled a bit with the present day chapters. Might have to revisit this one and see if it works better for me on a reread. 8mo
6 likes2 stack adds1 comment
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eve
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Pickpick

A few weeks ago I had the great joy of talking to Ross Gay about this book. Ross‘s poetry transformed my own work and the way I look at the world. (Even if you don‘t know him you may have seen his viral poem about Eric Garner, “A Small Needful Fact.”) For this book, he tried to write a small essay about delight every day for a year, and what results is sweet but not sugary, and challenging in quiet and unexpected ways.

10 likes3 stack adds
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eve
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Pickpick

This was a whirlwind story that was impossible to step away from, largely because Ng manages to make each of her [quite large ensemble of] characters have at least some moment of fullness, or complication. Sweet, often painful, and a little bit scandalous.

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eve
Kitchen Confidential | Anthony Bourdain
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Pickpick

I‘m still so saddened by the passing of Anthony Bourdain, and I figured I was overdue on this one. The fact that the audiobook is read by him is a delight. There‘s a lot of uncouth and fairly predictably bad stuff about race (mostly essentializing people, e.g. lots of talk about “hard working Ecuadorians” and unfortunate attempt to imitate accents) but I still loved it. What a writer. We‘re worse off without him around. [painting by Thomas Evans!]

10 likes5 stack adds
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eve
Exit West: A Novel | Mohsin Hamid
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Pickpick

A novel that seduces you with a love story set against the backdrop of war in a nameless country—a war presented in a way that is jarringly humanizing, that is matter-of-fact in its violence—then pivots to a magical realism that gives us a new way to think about migration, refugees, borders, and nationhood. Really hard and really good.
[photo by Maree Turner]

lynneamch The magical realism didn't work for me, but I still thought it was excellent and recommend it. 13mo
3 likes4 stack adds1 comment
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eve
Sing, Unburied, Sing | Jesmyn Ward
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Pickpick

This book may not be true, but it‘s real. A ghost story, a family story, a love story, a southern Gothic for our ages, it‘s brutal and brilliant and tender. This is a great American novel with all the glory and violence that implies. [image: boys in captivity under the convict leasing system, c. 1903]

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eve
Pachinko | Min Jin Lee
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Pickpick

I know this book doesn‘t need me to add to its chorus of accolades, but I‘m gonna do it anyway. Not often, but every once in a while, I read a novel that spans generations in a way that makes you deeply invested in a family as though they were your own. A novel that‘s primarily important not for its social commentary (though it has that) but for the tender realness of its depictions. A novel you mourn when it‘s done. This is that.
[image: NYT]

12 likes18 stack adds
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eve
An American Marriage | Tayari Jones
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So I‘ve never been really good at the idea of “summer reading” or I feel like it confuses me as a social construct but this book has me feeling like I finally get it. Talk about sucked in. I just sat down and read 60 pages in one go. Eager to finish and my friends are eager for me to finish so we can debrief!

10 likes17 stack adds
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eve
The Poet X | Elizabeth Acevedo
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Thank all the ancestors, gods and goddesses, poetry spirits and space aliens that Liz has written The Poet X. one of my favorite YA picks in a long time. get it for your Afro-Latinx students, your aspiring writers, young people struggling with religion, or anyone else with good taste. Bonus - Liz is a deeply kind and good-hearted person and her spirit shines here.

15 likes8 stack adds
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eve
The Hate U Give | Angie Thomas
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Pickpick

This book gives so much. I struggled with it a bit in the beginning, but the protagonist is so lovable and so full and so smart and insightful. A roster of imperfect and very real characters entangled in a too-real situation after a teen boy is shot and killed by the police. This book will spark so much great conversation with young people, but it‘s more than An Important Book. It‘s also terribly rich and tender.

the-flashley Totally agree. I loved this one. 2y
Chelleo This is a fave! #BlackLitsy #Blitsy (edited) 2y
19 likes9 stack adds2 comments
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eve
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Just thinking about how excited I am to see this totally strange, compelling, classic, confusing, frustrating, provocative book come to life.
[art by Taj Francis]

Anton I've never read the book, but I'm very excited for the film. Ava Duvernay can do no wrong! 2y
Theadp How did you end up liking the film? I haven't seen it yet. 13mo
eve @Theadp I think I may have liked it more than the book?!?!?!?!?!? or at least I think it improves on the book in some notable ways 13mo
Theadp @eve that's quite a feat! Now I really can't wait to see it. Thanks! 13mo
6 likes2 stack adds4 comments
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eve
Swing Time | Zadie Smith
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What a peculiar book. It was captivating but I can‘t say quite why. Part of it is that it‘s so *masterfully* crafted. Reminds me that Zadie Smith, whatever I think of her politics, could probably write the mess out of a grocery list. I think this would be a good book club pick bc it gives you lots to talk about - about intimate relationships between women & about colonialism/saviorism especially. [ft. a little pic I took in London this summer]

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eve
The Origin of Others | Toni Morrison
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This is a really quick read (it‘s a lecture that was presented at the humanities center at Harvard) that synthesizes some of Morrison‘s thoughts on the nature of othering, using examples from her own work. I imagine it would be a nice complement if you‘re reading or recently read any of her novels.

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eve
Shadowhouse Fall | Daniel Jos Older
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Pickpick

Daniel José Older‘s first book in this series, Shadowshaper, was terrific, and I think I like the sequel even more. The Brooklyn of Sierra and her friends, who use magical abilities to channel the spirits of the dead and, is richer and funnier and fuller and more challenging. Awesome YA book that folks of any age can dig into.

[fan art by Emily B. Martin]

hajra I need to get my hands on this book! 2y
11 likes3 stack adds1 comment
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eve
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Pickpick

There is much to take away from this memoir. It will have me thinking for a long time about bodies, about the way we deem them "unruly" and use that category to harm, judge, control, and silence people, especially women. It's also just a candid look at the very non-linear path of one of America's most successful writers.

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eve
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Pickpick

I thought this book would be cute and instead it was cute and also made me cry 😣 that's it, that's my review.

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eve
Parable of the Sower | Octavia E. Butler
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"Q: What would you like readers to get from this novel? What would you like them to think about?

A: I hope people who read Parable of the Sower will think about where we seem to be heading--we the United States, even we the human species. Where are we going? What sort of future are we creating? Is it the kind of future you want to live in?"

Read this book in 5 days this week and I'm both grateful & terrified in its aftermath.

9 likes10 stack adds
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eve
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"African American genealogy is based on the fine art of scaling an invisible brick wall." A word. The earliest black ancestor whose name I know (Adeline Turner) is on the 1870 census and before that... who knows.

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eve
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It's sad that I'm about to dive into this new book when I'm at the airport without a lot of great food options... do BBQ chips count as African-American culinary history?? 😂

9 likes8 stack adds
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eve
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Finally reading this book that's definitely on the top ten list of Books People Frequently Ask Me If I've Read. Currently in a car on a family road trip, trying futilely to rest/elevate my knee that is killing me after a five-mile run yesterday 😫 I truly think that as a writer you benefit from developing some other kind of disciplined/focused activity--yoga, gardening, or running...whatever gets your mind right.

But meanwhile. Ouch.

13 likes6 stack adds
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eve
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"Portrait-ready American blues. Palm trees and back issues of JET, pink lotion, gin on ice, zebras, fig lipstick. One day we learned to migrate. One day we studied Mamma making her face."

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eve
The January Children | Safia Elhillo
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Pickpick

Phenomenal collection from my friend Safia, a poet of Sudanese descent exploring themes of displacement, love, borders, racial identity, and colorism, with characteristic nuance and sensitivity. A melancholic and beautiful little book.

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eve
Homegoing: A novel | Yaa Gyasi
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Pickpick

This book is a gift. It has marked the way I think about so many things-- the Diaspora, lineage, home, rupture. It provides shape and texture to a slice of history we rarely hear about, and is full of characters who emerge as full even in relatively short chapters. Also, I don't remember the last time I read 300 pages this fast-- it's addictive and also digestible (though tragic at points). Great read.

18 likes19 stack adds
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eve
Blood Dazzler | Patricia Smith
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This book has me thinking about the idea of verse journalism and the role poets can play in documentation during times of crisis. One of my favorite books of poetry every. Presents a totally different way of thinking about Hurricane Katrina and is as fresh and painful as ever.

2 likes3 stack adds
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eve
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"But every slave thinks about it. In the morning and in the afternoon and in the night. Dreaming of it. Every dream a dream of escape even when it didn't look like it."

This book is absolutely as good and as important as you've heard.

10 likes16 stack adds
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eve
The Turner House | Angela Flournoy
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Pickpick

did I stay hanging around a bar by myself the Sunday after Thanksgiving to finish this book? I sure did. A lovely and lively meditation on family, the ghosts that haunt us, and post-industrial black urban life. This is one of those novels that everyone can love.

6 likes8 stack adds
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eve
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Pickpick

Terrific book about the inequalities faced by Chicago high school students, especially around policing and the carceral state. Well-researched and thoughtful.

Anton Yay for a post from Eve! 3y
eve @Anton I know, I read so slowly! 😩 3y
6 likes7 stack adds2 comments
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eve
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"We are spoon-fed an easily digestible image of the young Ali.... There is barely a trace left of the ragged truth: Never has an athlete been more reviled by the mainstream press, more persecuted by the U.S. government, or more defiantly beloved throughout the world than Muhammad Ali."

flowernessa I dig Dave Zirin. 4y
14 likes7 stack adds1 comment
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eve
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this is really long and really hard to read but I feel like I have to finish it 😩

Virgo I felt the same way. Parts of it were so lyrical and moving. At other times I struggled with the dialects and the violence. By the time I finished, I was exhausted but wanted more... 4y
Sydsavvy Help, me too! 4y
9 likes5 stack adds2 comments
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eve
The Nameless City | Faith Erin Hicks
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Mehso-so

I bought this on the enthusiastic recommendation of my comic shop clerk. It was a fast read and it was decent--I could see the series picking up in the future because the characters were cool. Definitely shades of Avatar: The Last Airbender, but not quite there.

1 like1 stack add
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eve
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I've been waiting a long time for the inimitable Natalie's book to drop. Reading it now as I prep to moderate a panel with her at the end of the month (stay tuned). Part journalism, part personal memoir (Natalie grew up in the Chatham community of Chicago).

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