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The Radiance of the King
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
23 posts | 8 read | 1 reading | 6 to read
At the beginning of this masterpiece of African literature, Clarence, a white man, has been shipwrecked on the coast of Africa. Flush with self-importance, he demands to see the king, but the king has just left for the south of his realm. Traveling through an increasingly phantasmagoric landscape in the company of a beggar and two roguish boys, Clarence is gradually stripped of his pretensions, until he is sold to the royal harem as a slave. But in the end Clarences bewildering journey is the occasion of a revelation, as he discovers the image, both shameful and beautiful, of his own humanity in the alien splendor of the king.
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Billypar
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Final NYRB Bonus Question!
We've read so many great novels during this book club - do you have a favorite? Or a top 3-5?

Billypar (Image by artist Ismael Hipolito Djata) 1w
vivastory My top 5: Cassandra at the Wedding, Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, The Go-Between, The Vet's Daughter, Katalin Street. (Hon. mention to During the Reign of Queen of Persia for the impromptu read through of Margaret Laurence w/ the #manawakans ) 1w
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LeahBergen My top 5 (which I whittled down from 12!): The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne, Cassandra at the Wedding, A Month in the Country, School for Love, and Good Behaviour. @vivastory 1w
LeahBergen My next top 5: The Go-Between, Black Wings Has My Angel, The Vet‘s Daughter, Lolly Willowes, and The Expendable Man. 🤣🤣 1w
LeahBergen @vivastory Yes! I‘m so thankful the Queen of Persia set us off on that Margaret Laurence buddy read. ❤️❤️ 1w
Liz_M Some of my favorite discussions were for The True Deceiver, Queen of Persia, Iza's Ballad and The Other 1w
vivastory @LeahBergen I'd def. put Good Behaviour, Expendable Man, Black Wings Has My Angel & Month in the Country in my next top 5 👏 👏 1w
vivastory @Liz_M The Other was one that I had read once before & I def enjoyed it more the second time around bc of the discussion 1w
merelybookish Well this is a tough question! I gave 5 ⭐ s to A Month in the Country, The Hearing Trumpet, Turtle Diary, A Game of Hide & Seek, Cassandra at the Wedding. But I have several others that I gave 4 ⭐ s to that could also qualify as faves. I really appreciate how this book club introduced me to writers I want to read more of (Taylor, Compton-Burnett, Comyns, Hardwick, Keane, etc.) 1w
merelybookish Thank you Scott for this experience! And my apologies for pooping out on the last book. @vivastory @Billypar 1w
merelybookish Nicely done @LeahBergen 😆 1w
vivastory @merelybookish Like I said, if you ever see this one in the wild def grab it. I think you'd find it interesting. I def plan on reading further works by authors that this group introduced me to. 1w
Liz_M @vivastory Thank you so much for organizing the best bookclub on Litsy! I will miss it even though I often missed the discussions. I read this months selection a few years ago and am traveling today. So sad to not be able to participate fully, @Billypar 1w
BarbaraBB I already made a collage of my top 5 that I‘ll post now to inspire all who haven‘t read the gems we read with this bookclub! Will tag you all. Thanks Vinny for the thoughtful questions re our final book! 🤍 1w
BarbaraBB @LeahBergen 🤣❤️ 1w
GatheringBooks Great Q! In 2019, there were books I couldn‘t read along with you all because of our #WomenReadWomen2019 reading theme. But my faves are still by female authors: Iza‘s Ballad, Katalin Street, The True Deceiver, Free Day, and In The Freud Archives. 1w
GatheringBooks Thank you, everyone, for making this so memorable and so much fun! Loved our discussions! Thank you to @vivastory most of all for bringing all these readers from across the globe together every month. 1w
quietjenn I only participated in Round 2, so all my picks are from the last year and a half - During the Reign of the Queen of Persia, Lolly Willowes, The Go-Between, The Vet's Daughter, & Good Behaviour. My list could easily be longer! I so appreciated the discussion of all the books, even ones I didn't love (or totally understand). I'm planning to still try to read at least one NYRB book a month, & will probably start with some of the Round 1 favorites! 1w
Billypar @vivastory @GatheringBooks @BarbaraBB @Liz_M @merelybookish @LeahBergen This was a tough call, but here goes: 1. The True Deceiver 2. The Dud Avocado 3. Katalin Street 4. Lolly Willowes 5. Hons and Rebels. 1w
Billypar Cassandra at the Wedding was before I joined, but it sounds like I really need to prioritize that one! 1w
vivastory @GatheringBooks Great choices! Nearly all of my choices were by female authors. Thank you for your thoughtful contributions each month! 1w
vivastory @quietjenn Terrific choices! In case I haven't mentioned this I have a bookshelf on my GR account of all of the selections we read since the beginning:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/53745996-scott?ref=nav_mybooks&shelf=nyrbb...
1w
vivastory @Billypar Thanks for co-hosting this month! Those are wonderful selections. I rec Hons 7 Rebels to someone a couple of months ago & they loved it! I really need to read more work by Jessica Mitford. 1w
quietjenn @vivastory thanks for sharing the bookshelf! 1w
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Billypar
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Q6: At the end of the novel, Clarence is depressed at being deceived about his role in Aziana and is reluctant to face the king (let alone put on clothes). Was his final meeting with the king what you were expecting? How did you interpret this encounter?

Billypar (Image by artist Jean-Michel Basquiat) 1w
GatheringBooks Given all that Clarence has gone through, as he is gradually stripped of complete self-awareness, and at the same time utterly disgraced, it is not surprising that he now sees the King in all his radiance and glory - almost deity-like in his beneficence. What struck me though is how the White man needed to be brought literally to his knees, stripped naked, in total disgrace before he recognizes and acknowledges this. 1w
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quietjenn I feel like it's a bit more shame than depression? He feels unworthy because - for at least the moment - he recognizes that he is no Great White Saviour, but literally just a cock. And there's shame and embarrassment in being good for nothing except breeding. As to the actual meeting, I didn't know quite what to make of it, especially given those blurbs and things that led me to expect something extraordinary. Which, maybe? 1w
vivastory @GatheringBooks I was also struck by the mystical aspect of the ending 1w
Billypar @quietjenn @GatheringBooks @vivastory I was prepared for the king to be a disappointment. The book had a satirical tone for most of it, so to have the king display the kind of warmth that he did was unexpected for me, almost as if he was aligned with Clarence's own fantasy. So I found myself doubting if it actually occurred as recounted or if it was wishful thinking on Clarence's part. 1w
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Billypar
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Q5: Clarence makes many references to odors that make him sleepy, first “the crowd‘s herd-like odor” and later in the forest “the terrible odor of flowers and decay.” When he further considers the forest‘s odor, he thinks, “it is not just an odor of decaying vegetation; it is subtlety itself, a seductive perfume, or rather the seductive mingling of a thousand perfumes […] all of them far too heady, disturbing, caressing, […] far too delectable.”

Billypar (Image by artist Ismael Hipolito Djata) 1w
vivastory I'm honestly a bit at a loss on the odors, lol. It almost seems like he is using them as an excuse for what he perceives as “less civilized“ behavior. 1w
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vivastory Also, Clarence throughout the novel is constantly complaining to everyone about his situation but he acts entirely helpless, including anytime he smells these odors. It almost seems like a crutch. 1w
BarbaraBB I admit I am at loss on the odors too. I interpreted them as prejudices but I am not sure if I‘m right about that. 1w
Billypar @vivastory @BarbaraBB Ha - I was hoping someone could clue me in on the odor question, but it's pretty strange, right? But it makes sense that it has something to do with his prejudices - like he assumes it's overcoming him and it stops him from being conscious of seeing things as they really are. 1w
GatheringBooks I agree with you all that this is once again evidence of his prejudice; plus whenever anyone mentions “culture shock” - this typically includes sights, sounds, and SMELLS most of all. His disdain and total disregard commingle with the disgust accompanying smells that he dismisses as repulsive; yet eventually one that he inexplicably gravitates towards; the earthiness dizzying scent of it all that he attributes to be the cause of his primal acts. 1w
quietjenn I also think it ties into his prejudices. And I think that he uses it as an excuse for his oblivion and his perpetual sleepy state - he was proverbially drugged and drunk on the sensory experiences, as much as by the wine he's constantly drinking. 1w
vivastory @quietjenn That is an excellent point about the wine! I think that you are right, that it is a way for him to remain in an altered state. It's almost like drug tourism, but instead of using cannabis etc he is using wine & the odors. 1w
15 likes9 comments
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Billypar
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Q4: There is lots of dialogue concerning the difference between ‘favors‘ versus ‘rights‘. At one point, when Clarence asks why the beggar couldn‘t ask the judge to pardon him, he responds, “Can‘t you get it into your thick head that one cannot beg the favor of receiving something that is one‘s ‘right‘?” What is the novel‘s philosophy on justice when it comes to ‘favors‘ versus ‘rights.‘?

Billypar (Image by artist Ismael Hipolito Djata) 1w
GatheringBooks Clarence‘s “rights” enable him to take whatever he wishes simply because he wants something. He cannot be the object of “favors” - he needs to be the one who dispenses those favors; it is always a matter of power and asserting one‘s sense of ascendancy over another (in this case racial), no matter that perception being totally unfounded and unjustified 1w
vivastory @GatheringBooks I have nothing to add because you said it perfectly! 1w
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Billypar
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Q3: Clarence is constantly confusing one thing for another—faces look the same, a corridor in Aziana looks like one from the legal offices in Adramé, he believes the path the beggar leads them through the forest is going in circles. Why is Clarence perpetually confused?

Billypar (Image by artist Nu Barreto) 1w
vivastory I think that on a surface level it is an unfamiliarity with these areas that caused confusion, but I also think that Laye cleverly utilized plot points from Kafka's The Castle to explore Clarence's prejudices. 1w
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BarbaraBB I think he‘s looking for some standards to hold on to, more or less desperately because all around him is so unknown to him. I know @vivastory compared it to Kafka and read this more often but I tend to agree with @Sapphire who compared Clarence to Ignatius Reilly, a king of caricature (edited) 1w
Billypar @vivastory The Castle frustrated me so much, lol. I liked this one better but I did recognize the overlap in the style of dialogue. I felt like it was more complex - Clarence isn't an objective perspective from which we're supposed to identify. 1w
GatheringBooks I think it is a not-too-subtle nod to the fact that most white people purportedly cannot tell people of color apart - add the fact that Clarence could simply not be bothered. Plus I honestly think he is stupid and overconfident - often a lethal combination. He knows he will be recognized everywhere he goes, the onus is on others to remember things for him to retain his perpetual state of obliviousness and total indifference to the people he‘s with 1w
quietjenn For me, it all ties back with the preconceived ideas he comes to Africa with and Laye is playing with the racist “they all look alike“ sentiment, extended to apply not just to names and faces, but the landscape, the buildings, and pretty much everything he encounters. 1w
vivastory @BarbaraBB I think that there were plot points in common with Kafka, but as far as Clarence's character, I def. agree with you & @sapphire he is a bit of a caricature! 1w
vivastory @GatheringBooks Your comment about “Clarence could simply not be bothered“ really gets at the issue. There is an implied sense of safety & aloofness that he carries with him because of his race & his own sense of superiority that greatly impacts how he treats others. (edited) 1w
vivastory @Billypar I, too was frustrated by The Castle, but it was one of those works that I think I recall because I really struggled with it, lol. It's one of my least fave Kafka works TBH, but the sense of constantly being delayed from reaching a goal is memorable regardless. And I agree, Clarence is not a sympathetic character! 1w
vivastory @quietjenn One thing that I discussed with Vinny was the fact that there are certain characters that he never even bothers asking their names! We never find out the name of the beggar. This fits your comment about his racist sentiment I think. 1w
BarbaraBB @GatheringBooks you‘ve nailed it with this comment. 1w
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Billypar
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Q2: Right from the novel‘s opening, Clarence has a belief in white supremacy that guides his actions and observations. How would you describe his journey throughout the novel when it comes to racism? What factors lead to his change?

Billypar (Image by artist Nu Barreto) 1w
BarbaraBB Because he‘s the only white person his feeling of supremacy goes completely nowhere, no one is treating him the way he expects to be treated. On the contrary, he suddenly experienced how it feels to be the minority where people look down upon, who people judge etc. He becomes the stereotype! 1w
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Billypar @BarbaraBB It's pretty hilarious how he just assumes he'll be welcomed into the king's service, but his actual usefulness in the village is totally different, even though it still serves that ultimate racist purpose when it comes to the value placed on skin color. 1w
GatheringBooks It is hilarious (and tragic) how deeply entrenched his feeling of superiority is - the way he treated everyone else with disdain remained constant throughout. While there seems to be a transformation at the very end with his being in the presence of the king, i feel that he will eventually find a way to reframe that later on to his own advantage/benefit, away from the radiance of the king. Maybe I just find him to be without redemption. 🤷🏽‍♀️ 1w
quietjenn The entitlement is pretty mind-boggling, although completely believable. And his oblivion throughout, because he can't shift to seeing things outside of that mindset. Does he truly shed himself of it, even when he recognizes the true nature of his role in the village and experiences the final radiance? I'm not sure! 1w
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Billypar
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Q1: In the Introduction, Toni Morrison notes that for previous novels by Western authors, “Africa was simultaneously innocent and corrupting, savage and pure, irrational and wise. It was raw matter […] to examine desire and improve character. But what Africa never was, was its own subject.” How does Laye use previous stereotypes about Africa to craft a novel about Africa itself?

LeahBergen I (sadly) didn‘t get around to reading this last pick for our book club this month. 😭 I blame travelling and a bout of Covid! Anyhow, I‘m going to follow this discussion because it‘s our last and I might just get to this book one day. 1w
Billypar (Image by artist Nu Barreto) 1w
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vivastory I am woefully under read when it comes to novels written by Africans. I will be interested to see what people say who have been participating in #ReadingAfrica22 I did mention in my review that I was reminded of the fantastical work of Nigerian writer Amos Tutuola while reading this. I don't know if Laye had familiarity with Tutuola's work while writing Radiance or not. (edited) 1w
Billypar @LeahBergen No worries - if you do end up picking it up later, interested to get your take. It's a trip! 1w
Billypar @vivastory I only read The Palm Wine Drinkard but parts definitely reminded me of that - especially the more fantastic scenes like the fish women. 1w
GatheringBooks I loved how the author used some of the stereotypes about Africa to turn the story over on its own head - a literary subversion done masterfully: a few elements that come to mind are the mass of bodies, nudity, the smells, and the human sacrifice - all perceived from the dominant white gaze; except that the gaze is deliberately portrayed as flawed, susceptible, vacuous - despite it being gratuitously entitled. 1w
BarbaraBB I‘ve read a lot of African books this year and have been pleasantly surprised by the ones written by African writers still living there (unlike many authors now living in the US and Europe). Of course African countries have their own identities, not defined by “us” and our western way of thinking. It‘s so refreshing. This book emphasizes traditional western views and prejudices. @vivastory 1w
Billypar @GatheringBooks Yeah - I think that's the most interesting part- the main character isn't just a stand-in for the reader and someone whose perspective we're passively assuming. We know from the start that his perspective is suspect, so we see those tropes in a different light. 1w
Billypar @BarbaraBB Right - those authors aren't just authorities on their countries but they also know how foreigners respond due to the colonial history, so you get to see that side represented in the novels. 1w
quietjenn I feel pretty underread in this area as well, although I've more familiarity with some of the Africa by White (Colonial) writers books, including a few that are mentioned in the introduction. @GatheringBooks puts it wonderfully in saying that Laye “used some of the stereotypes about Africa to turn the story over on its own head“ and slyly subverts them. 1w
Leftcoastzen What @GatheringBooks said ! It was like seeing a peek at real Africa , then back to Clarence‘s point of view. A very suspect & entitled one. 1w
batsy I'm so sorry that I wasn't able to squeeze this in in time for the discussion! If I'm able to get to it this month, I'll come back to revisit the discussion... The questions are super interesting. 1w
Vansa I didn't know this was being read this month, i think I wasn't tagged in the post! This sounds amazing, as @batsy has said above, will revisit the discussion once I read it! 1w
Billypar @batsy @Vansa If you do pick it up, I'd love to hear your thoughts on such a complex and multilayered read. As @quietjenn mentions, the introduction is very helpful in putting the novel into the context of literary history, so I'd recommend that too (but probably after you finish it because there are spoilers). 1w
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review
Leftcoastzen
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Pickpick

#NYRBBookClub 😳”Snakes.Why did it have to be Snakes ?“ There is so much to unpack in this book ! Looking forward to the discussion. I enjoyed it.Almost like a weird fever dream.

Billypar Lol - I love your quote. I don't think empathizing with other cultures was any more of a forte for Dr. Jones than it was for Clarence! 😅 1w
Leftcoastzen @Billypar indeed!🐍🐍🐍🐍🐍🐍 1w
48 likes2 comments
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quietjenn
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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A.C., leftover pizza, and reading to make sure I'm ready for the last #nyrbbookclub discussion. Also, a lot of cat hair 😸

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Sapphire
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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I get some of my best reading done in travel status. Hoping this one grabs me. @vivastory described it as Kafka in Africa. I respect his taste a lot. However, At only 38 pages in, it‘s feeling more Toole and confederacy of dunces to me. I really disliked COD. Still this feels like an important read and it ticks boxes in several challenges/ groups so I am pressing on.

vivastory Thanks for the kind words! I can see the COD comparison. The second half of the book it becomes disorienting & stranger than in the first half. I'll be curious to see what you think. Safe travels! 2w
BarbaraBB I agree with you although I liked the book better than CoD 2w
22 likes2 comments
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Leftcoastzen
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Starting the last book in the long run of the #NYRBBookClub definitely bittersweet.I‘ve barely started but the white mans sense of entitlement while being in dire straits is strangely familiar! 😂Tom Tom the book model. #catsoflitsy

vivastory I look forward to your thoughts on this one. Laye's take on the self-important white man is a memorable one! 2w
47 likes1 comment
review
BarbaraBB
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Pickpick

#NYRBBookClub

Clarence has been shipwrecked in Africa, lost all his money gambling, and is about to get kicked out of the dirty inn where he stays. So he needs to meet the king, who will surely give him, a white man, an important job. Instead of the king he meets a beggar and a pair of teenage rascals. They help him stay out of trouble and accompany him to the south where the king will probably show up again. ⬇️⬇️

BarbaraBB What seems a story of Clarence's often Kafkaesque adventures, is in the end more a book about the nature of perception and openness to experience: Clarence is simply incapable of experiencing or understanding West Africa. 2w
BarbaraBB Because Camara Laye is from #Guinea I guess that the book is set there. #ReadingAfrica2022 🇬🇳 @Librarybelle #192025 #1954 (edited) 2w
Librarybelle Good find! 2w
vivastory Terrific review 👏👏 I'm looking forward to the discussion! 2w
71 likes4 comments
review
vivastory
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Pickpick

Camara Laye's 1954 novel opens with Clarence, a shipwrecked European who literally elbows his way to the front of a crowd gathered on an esplanade to see the king. He makes an acquaintance with an individual whom he simply refers to as the beggar throughout the novel, despite his acting as a guide among other things, & he begs the beggar to request a job with the king (the irony). The attempts are unsuccessful, but he is encouraged to👇

vivastory travel south where the king will reappear & he might petition once more, this time in a different manner. This is the set-up for this novel that incorporates plot points from Kafka (notably The Castle & The Trial), travel narratives, quest stories, the African surrealism of Nigerian author Amos Tutuola etc. I loved this disorienting novel that cleverly comments on the prejudices & biases of the MC & as the Kwame Anthony 2w
vivastory Appias blurb on the back cover states, “the puzzle lies in the book's wonderfully unsettling end, which calls on us all to respond with an interpretation of our own.“ A fitting ending for the #NYRBBookClub & will make for a great discussion!
@billypar
2w
62 likes2 comments
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vivastory
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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I am greatly enjoying the #NYRBBookClub selection. Kafka in Africa? Yes, please.
@Billypar

Sapphire Got it from the library finally! Hope to start it on Monday 3w
vivastory @Sapphire I'm glad you found a copy! It's very interesting so far (I'm halfway through) 3w
Billypar I'm enjoying it too! I'm almost at the halfway point and am loving the strange comedy (definitely Kafka-inspired) and dreamlike quality. 3w
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vivastory @Billypar It becomes even more disorienting in the second half. The ending is pretty remarkable! 2w
merelybookish I can't get a copy.☹️ I usually read our NYRB books on Kindle and it's not available in that format. I'm bummed. 2w
vivastory @merelybookish That's really strange! Well, if you do find a copy somewhere I rec. it. I will be posting a review on it in the next couple of days. I want to thank you again for being a part of the group 💙📚 There will be at least 1 question during the discussion that has to do with favorite book read during the group. I'd love to see your answer! 2w
merelybookish @vivastory It is strange! And yes of course! I will be lurking around the last discussion. I'm sad I won't be able to participate more. And how to choose just one? 😱 2w
54 likes7 comments
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GatheringBooks
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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#JulyJam Day 15: #ILoveHorsesDay reminded me of a scene from our #NYRBBookClub pick this July hosted by @vivastory
“They were strange horses, all caparisoned and panoplied and wearing layers of petticoats and some of them had even been dolled-up in silken trousers.”

Eggs Mmmm😋 4w
59 likes1 comment
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vivastory
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Join @billypar & I on 7/31 @ 1 EST for the #NYRBBookClub discussion of Radiance of the King. This will be a special discussion, as it will be my final month as a co-host. When I first tested the waters for interest in a monthly book club that specialized in NYRB Classics, I didn't anticipate the interest that was shown. Much less that it would last over three years. The members have made it what it has been & despite all the turmoil &👇

vivastory uncertainties in the world these past few years it has been a monthly bright spot. Thank you for the recommendations of books I might not have otherwise read & for the brilliant discussions! (photo credit: various Littens) 4w
mklong Alright, I‘ve got to get back on the ball and join in this last discussion! Thank you so much for getting this group together and keeping it going for so long! 4w
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JamieArc I have not been a part of this, but I have acquired some NYRB books and added many, many more to my TBR because of your discussions. 4w
BarbaraBB I feel similar. Our books, our discussions and our Littens lightened up so many of my days! 4w
Addison_Reads Although I have not participated in this group because of it I started seeking out NYRB titles at my local libraries to read. You all had such wonderful commentary on the books that you read that I couldn't help but add them to my TBR to hopefully read and enjoy one day. 4w
youneverarrived Definitely a highlight of Litsy 🤍 I‘ve read so many books I wouldn‘t have otherwise read and most of them memorable. 4w
merelybookish End of a Litsy era. ❤️ 4w
Leftcoastzen A great host! A great run! Interesting conversations , will miss it. 4w
batsy What @merelybookish said. It's been one of the highlights of my reading in recent years ❤️ 4w
quietjenn Echoing all the sentiments here! My reading life has been so enriched by the group and participants.💙 4w
vivastory @mklong I'd love it if you joined for the final discussion! 📚 4w
vivastory @JamieArc I'm really happy to hear that! NYRB is one of my favorite publishers. The discussion will be open to all, so if you read it beforehand please feel free to join 4w
vivastory @BarbaraBB 💙 Cassandra & True Deceiver. Thanks for the support! 4w
vivastory @Addison_Reads I'm so happy to hear that! I hope you will find new favorites. If you read Radiance etc before the discussion please feel free to join us 4w
vivastory @youneverarrived I was always amazed by books that were nominated that I was completely unfamiliar with. I had spent so much time with their catalog, so many riches. 4w
vivastory @merelybookish Thanks for the support 💙 I look forward to continuing to discuss books on Litsy with you 4w
vivastory @Leftcoastzen Great conversations 📚 I look forward to continuing to talk through each other's posts 4w
vivastory @batsy That means a lot. Thanks for your support & your great comments 💙 4w
vivastory @quietjenn I'm happy to hear this! I've enjoyed your comments during the discussions 👏 Look forward to your posts 4w
LeahBergen I‘m going to miss this little club! 😭 3w
vivastory @LeahBergen Thanks for the support, friend 💙 It's been a great experience 📚 3w
emilyhaldi The best part of Litsy ❤️ Thank you for hosting 🥲 1w
70 likes23 comments
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GatheringBooks
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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#JulyJam Day 11: #SwimmingPoolDay is perfect as we have now reached my sister-in-law‘s place here in the Bay Area (Antioch, California) and our #NYRBBookClub July pick is lounging by my sis-in-law‘s pool (with a jacuzzi!!) to relax for a bit. Entire month of bliss. 💕💕💕🌺🌺🌺

Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks Beautiful 💙 1mo
LibrarianRyan I want to dip in that pool so bad. It's so pretty. 1mo
Eggs Happy Vacation 🥰📖🏊‍♀️ 1mo
60 likes3 comments
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GatheringBooks
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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#BookMoods Day 24: Our final #NYRBBookClub selection - happening in July - seems to be about #Royalty.

Alwaysbeenaloverofbooks 👑 📚🙌🏻 2mo
Eggs 🤴 🧡👸🏻 2mo
49 likes2 comments
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vivastory
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Join @Billypar & I in July as we read & discuss Guinean author Camara Laye's sophomore novel. The July selection will mark the last month for our current group & a little over 3 years since #NYRBBookClub first started. After some thought I have decided to not continue as a co-host. The monthly discussions have been a monthly bright spot for me & it prompted me to read several books that I would not have otherwise read that are now favorites.👇

vivastory However, due to life circumstances, I am needing to simplify & recalibrate & am unable to commit to another round with the group. I know that I have thanked the group for the insightful & thoughtful discussion so frequently that it has become my monthly default signature. But I genuinely mean it. The books have been wonderful, but it's been the members that have made the past 3 years of discussions memorable. 3mo
merelybookish Thank you Scott! You are the reason this book club has been such a success! And you have put a lot of time and energy into making it run so well. It has been a special experience! And the best book club I've been a part of. (All that was missing was a 🍷 together. 😉) 3mo
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Billypar I've enjoyed this book club so much - you've done excellent work coordinating it, Scott, and I've really appreciated the variety of books and authors it's exposed me to and the lively discussions every month. Well done! 👏👏🤓 3mo
BarbaraBB I would have loved that 🍷 too but other than that, the #NYRBBookClub has been one of the highlights of Litsy for the past three years. I understand and respect your decision and want to thank you again for all your work and energy! Looking forward to this book 🤍 3mo
LeahBergen Thanks so much, Scott, for making this book club one of my favourite corners of Litsy. 😘😘 3mo
quietjenn I'm so grateful to have been a part of it. I've truly loved it and thank you so much for making it happen. 3mo
sprainedbrain Thank you for all of your work and insight! 3mo
batsy Thank you, Scott. You are why this book club even exists and I appreciate all the time and care you've put into coordinating it. It's truly been one of my favourite experiences on Litsy 💜 3mo
vivastory @merelybookish Thanks! Your kind words mean a lot. I might have to pick up a special bottle for the final discussion.🍷 3mo
vivastory @Billypar Looking forward to co-hosting in July! I also look forward to continue discussing NYRB titles, beyond July 📚📚 3mo
vivastory @BarbaraBB Same! 🍷 Thanks for your contributions to the group. Looking forward to the final few selections 👏 3mo
vivastory @LeahBergen It's been wonderful! Who knows what buddy reads we'll think of down the road? 📚📚📚 3mo
vivastory @quietjenn Thanks for your contributions to the discussions. I've enjoyed getting to know you better 🙂 3mo
vivastory @sprainedbrain Thanks, Jenni! I appreciate it 3mo
vivastory @batsy Thank you for the kind words. I look forward to co-hosting next month & potential buddy reads down the road 💙 3mo
Leftcoastzen End of an era .Thanks for all your work keeping this thing going. We have been so fortunate to have such a great group ! NYRB is a great publisher. 3mo
sarahbarnes I was so grateful to be a part of the group this year! You were an amazing host and I‘ve loved so many of the books we read. Thank you for everything you put into this! ❤️ 3mo
youneverarrived Thanks Scott for putting this group together and carrying it on for 3 years. It‘s been amazing. Such a brilliant group of people and reads. Definitely been a highlight of Litsy. I‘ve read a lot of books I‘ve loved that I wouldn‘t have read if not for this group ❤️ 3mo
arubabookwoman I've thiroughly enjoyed my short time in this group, and am thankful for being directed to books I probably would not otherwise have read. Thank you so much for organizing the group and for such astute comments. I loved participating! 3mo
vivastory @Leftcoastzen It really was a magical group & I agree about NYRB. They are one of my favorites working today. Without a doubt. 3mo
vivastory @sarahbarnes Thanks for joining in! I really enjoyed getting to know you better over the past year & through the group discussions. 3mo
vivastory @youneverarrived Thanks, Katie! I always enjoyed your insights into the discussions. I plan on continuing to read NYRB, but not in such an organized fashion so I hope we can do a buddy read down the road! 3mo
vivastory @arubabookwoman Thank you for your comments during the discussions. I know that you had read several of them or other works by the same author. I always enjoyed your posts prior to you joining our group! 3mo
DrexEdit Thanks so much @vivastory for organizing this group. This is definitely a highlight of Litsy for me also even if I could never pull it together enough to participate regularly. I appreciate all the hard work you've done! 3mo
Sapphire I am sorry I came late to the party, but so glad to have “litsy met” you through this! 3mo
emilyhaldi Absolutely the end of an era!!! Thank you so much for hosting Scott, can‘t believe it‘s been 3 years! So many wonderful books read and I‘ve enjoyed this group so much 🥰 I am going to do my best to be a better participant for the last few reads - this new baby has brought my reading to a near standstill 🙃 so I understand the need to step back for other life priorities sometimes. Bittersweet ❤️ 3mo
vivastory @DrexEdit Thank you for joining in! I enjoyed your input into the discussions 👏 3mo
vivastory @Sapphire Thanks! I have enjoyed your posts and look forward to talking about good books 📚 3mo
vivastory @emilyhaldi Completely understood! I hope everything is going well with your family. If you are able to chime in, I'd love to hear your thoughts. 🤞 you are able to find some reading time soon 3mo
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review
ErnestB
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
Pickpick

This was my 3rd reading. It is better each time. Quest, redemption, clever clever wordplay, an utterly flawed main character, essentially a story of hope. The book is universal in its thoughts and aspirations. The Radiance inspires and forgives. Everyone should read this!!!

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Texreader
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Reading about the tagged book in Toni Morrison‘s The Source of Self-Regard... it sounds fascinating, a role reversal really. The white man becomes a slave in Africa.

review
Laura317
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Bailedbailed

Nope. I can‘t do this book. I don‘t understand what‘s going on at all. Too allegorical for me.

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Laura317
The Radiance of the King | Laye Camara, James Kirkup
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Starting this today. I am so behind on my Litsy around the world readings. It sounds intriguing. Has anyone read it?

Tamra No, but I‘m stacking! 4y
41 likes4 stack adds1 comment