Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--And Completely Unprepared
iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--And Completely Unprepared | Jean M Twenge
20 posts | 8 read | 29 to read
A highly readable and entertaining first look at how today's members of iGen--the children, teens, and young adults born in the mid-1990s and later--are vastly different from their Millennial predecessors, and from any other generation, from the renowned psychologist and author of Generation Me. With generational divides wider than ever, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand today's rising generation of teens and young adults. Born in the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s and later, iGen is the first generation to spend their entire adolescence in the age of the smartphone. With social media and texting replacing other activities, iGen spends less time with their friends in person--perhaps why they are experiencing unprecedented levels of anxiety, depression, and loneliness. But technology is not the only thing that makes iGen distinct from every generation before them; they are also different in how they spend their time, how they behave, and in their attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics. They socialize in completely new ways, reject once sacred social taboos, and want different things from their lives and careers. More than previous generations, they are obsessed with safety, focused on tolerance, and have no patience for inequality. iGen is also growing up more slowly than previous generations: eighteen-year-olds look and act like fifteen-year-olds used to. As this new group of young people grows into adulthood, we all need to understand them: Friends and family need to look out for them; businesses must figure out how to recruit them and sell to them; colleges and universities must know how to educate and guide them. And members of iGen also need to understand themselves as they communicate with their elders and explain their views to their older peers. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation--and the world.
Amazon Indiebound Barnes and Noble WorldCat Goodreads LibraryThing
Pick icon
100%
blurb
JesseConley
post image

Just getting started on iGen. Gets mixed reviews and I hear it has lots of stats... But it should be an interesting topic.

1 like1 stack add
blurb
AndreaG1

How best to help them? Encourage face to face time, get them out of the house, prepare them for debate and new ideas, make them get a drivers license build their residency skills!

review
LibraryCin
post image
Mehso-so

Fascinatiing. She includes a lot of statistics in the book; I like that she is able to compare the generations, but when all the generations were teens and young adults, due to surveys that have been done since the 1970s. there are a lot of graphs, which are hard to read on my small Kobo screen. The author did a lot of interviews, so she can take some of the stories from the interviews to highlight some of the findings. Very interesting book.

quote
Cedar_and_Grapefruit
post image

There it is... So sad.

blurb
Gina
post image

A moment of silence please...

Tamra 👍🏾👍🏾 8mo
10 likes1 comment
review
DoubleARon
Pickpick

I grabbed this book on the strength of a recommendation and the whim of my local library displaying it. It was a fascinating drive into the statistics (oxymoron, I know!) of what makes the latest generation to reach adulthood unique. The things that drive them, their tendencies, and their outlooks, all generated by 11 million surveys of the members of iGen. As a teacher, I found it fascinating and enlightening.

review
Cortg
post image
Pickpick

Living AND working with this generation, I can‘t say I learned a ton, but I did learn some. These kids have some pros and some cons to their “lifestyle” but overall I think they will be a great generation as they grow into adults. I am curious what they will officially be called.

blurb
Cortg
post image

When one book leads to another book AND TED talk. This is why my TBR list is so damn long! 😊

blurb
Cortg
post image

Finally making some time to read! My puppers is away for a 3 week doggie boot camp to get some socialization and manners. I miss him so much! Left: Angus on his way to boot camp. Right: First day at boot camp 🐶🐾🐾🐾 #dogsoflitsy

britt_brooke Oh, he‘s so cute!! 12mo
Jinjer I love him and his name, Angus💕 12mo
rubyslippersreads He looks like he‘s having fun at camp. 😊🐶 12mo
See All 7 Comments
Cortg @britt_brooke Thanks! 12mo
Cortg @Jinjer Thanks! His name had been changed once before and we didn‘t want to confuse him. As my husband says, “It‘s a good Scottish name!” 12mo
Cortg @rubyslippersreads We call him “The Attention Whore” and he‘ll be gettin A LOT of one on one attention with his training 😉 12mo
MicheleinPhilly 😍😍😍 12mo
33 likes7 comments
blurb
Cortg
post image

On my new, 5 min. work commute (😃) I caught a bit of an interview on this book. I‘m about 5 pages in and hooked! This is my kids generation and I work with a lot of teens and tweens. I‘m super curious about what this generation will be like as they enter the workforce!

26 likes2 stack adds
blurb
Gina
post image

A detail of my wallet purse themed bookstore of course.

And a ted talk about being bored.

https://www.facebook.com/1635900837/posts/10215388018807109/

That's all folks! Keep moving along...

wanderinglynn Love your wallet! What gorgeous detail! 😍😍😍 1y
Gina @wanderinglynn thanks♡ 1y
Reviewsbylola That‘s so cute! 1y
Gina @Reviewsbylola ♡♡♡ 1y
22 likes1 stack add4 comments
review
Sace
post image
Pickpick

2nd book of the #24in48 #readathon is done! I found this to be an informative listen and the tips at the end will be useful in the classroom too.

The chapter in politics was kind of scary though.

blurb
Sace
post image

With so little time left un the book I think I'm going to continue my #24in48 #readathon by going "off stack" and listen to an audiobook.

84 likes2 stack adds
blurb
Sace
post image

@Ke633 #tellmetuesday

1. Yes
2. I'm usually driving.
3. Almost anything 😑
4. I can't highlight/quoting for Litsy is near impossible. (that might just be my lazy showing.) BAD ACCENTS (I wish narrators wouldn't do accents.)
5. In English up to 2x faster. In Spanish no more than 1.5x (depends on narrator.)

Ke633 Thanks for playing along! 1y
Sace @Ke633 it was fun! 1y
64 likes2 comments
blurb
Sace
post image

Started this yesterday. Maybe not the best choice for audiobook...lots of explanation about data collecting and research. Stuff I would probably skip in a book when reading. Still, I'm enjoying some of the less number-y explain-y bits. Except for the the part where they talk about iGen kids not reading. 😱

RavenLovelyReads Yikes! That‘s interesting and scary at the same time. Let me know if you recommend it. 1y
Sace @RavenLovelyReads I think I would recommend reading over listening and I say that as a teacher. I should be taking notes! It really is interesting information and insights. 1y
Sace Ugh *has interesting 1y
84 likes3 comments
blurb
Gina
post image

I have seen my kids stare zombified at their screens to which I reply, daydreaming is the balm to what ails you my dear...

blurb
Ange44
post image

I'm reading this now. As a Generation X'er, it's interesting to learn about this newest generation. Times have sure changed!

10 likes2 stack adds
review
GerardtheBookworm
post image
Pickpick

Baby Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials. Now we have I-Geners, a generation of kids born during the age of the internet and technology. With the convenience of electronics, this new future is growing up with the obsession for social media, cyberbullying and a more disconnective society. SDSU professor examines this group who have a pragmatic view of social and political issues, dating, and economics. Deeply fascinating.

blurb
MrBook
post image

#TBRtemptation post 8! Just released. This book looks at the children, teens, and young adults born in the mid-1990s through the mid-2000s. Technology, the first ones to grow up with smartphones for example, is not the only differential with this group: how they allot their time; views on religion, sex, politics; how they socialize; etc., are looked at. #blameLitsy #blameMrBook 😎

BookBabe Omg! Must read! 😮 2y
76 likes16 stack adds1 comment