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ShansMousey

ShansMousey

Joined September 2016

Your friendly, neighborhood librarian and crochet crusader.
Pronouns: They/Them/Theirs
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ShansMousey
Rat Fair | Leah Rose Kessler
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This book is adorable! It's about a little community of rats wanting to put on their own art fair! The picture book is wordless, but the illustrations are so wonderfully detailed it is super easy to follow along!

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ShansMousey
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This is such a delightful, funny, and heartfelt manga about Satoko, a Japanese woman studying abroad in the United States, and her roommate Nada who is Muslim and from Saudi Arabia. The manga is lighthearted with a slice of life narrative. It's clearly from the Japanese POV since a lot of the comics are dedicated to educating the audience on Nada's culture. All in all though it's sweet and fun to read!

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ShansMousey
Boys Run the Riot 1 | Keito Gaku
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Boys Run the Riot follows transgender high schooler Ryo as he and his friends set out to make their own street fashion brand. For Ryo, his favorite fashions aren't just a way for him to express his style, but also a way to express his true self. What's great about this title is that the artist Keito Gaku is a trans man and pulls from many of his own experiences in crafting Ryo's story. The 1st vol contains an interview with the artist.

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ShansMousey
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This book does a really nice job of introducing pronouns to young children, explaining that they are just another way to describe oneself. I also like that they associate the pronouns with other descriptive words for the characters, for example Uncle Lior is described as "playful, collector, gardener and using they/them pronouns." All in all a great one-on-one story time for those looking to introduce more LGBTQ+ friendly titles to their kiddos!

2 likes1 stack add
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ShansMousey
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Tales of the Talented Tenth is a series of graphic novels featuring true stories of African Americans. Volume 3 tells the tale of Robert Smalls who stole the Confederate boat called Planter and delivered it to the Union during the Civil War. In addition to stealing the boat he helped rescue 13 enslaved people, bringing them and himself to freedom. The graphic novel is a great way to introduce kids to this often overlooked part of American history!

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ShansMousey
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A whimsical and beautiful graphic novel about a little sprite named Wisteria who tries to help a young human bring her garden to life. This graphic novel isn't too deep and the characters not fully developed, but honestly I feel the art is what was prioritized. And the art is gorgeous. So while you may not get a fully realized story, you do get some lovely images to look at. Definitely approach this one as if it were more art book than story.

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ShansMousey
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This is a really sweet slice of life story about caring mother Tomoko who suspects her eldest son Hiroki is gay. While Hiroki doesn't have the courage to come out just yet, Tomoko does her best to be supportive and let him figure out his identity at his own pace. Such a great and positive LGBTQ+ manga worth checking out.

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ShansMousey
Grandad's Camper | Harry Woodgate
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This was a very cute picture book about a grandfather sharing stories of his youth with his grandchild. The grandfather is gay and flashbacks of the book show him and his husband traveling around in their camper. This book would be great for both Grandparent's Day displays and Pride displays. You could even place it on Father's Day display if your book choices include books about both dads and grandads.

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ShansMousey
Too Bright to See | Kyle Lukoff
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After the death of a beloved uncle, Bug is certain he's still haunting the house. Not only that but Bug's pretty sure that Uncle Roderick is trying to leave Bug a message from beyond the grave.... I can't really say much more without spoiling this story, but for those looking for some positive LGBTQ+ rep this is a great one to check out! Add it to your Pride display this year. It'll make a great addition!

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ShansMousey
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This was a very personal read. My mom died of cancer in 2019 and a lot of what happens in this book happened to my mom; chemo destroying the body, the slow loss of lucidity, etc. The book really captures the experience of what it is like to lose someone slowly to cancer. I won't say I cried reading this, but it did leave me feeling a bit raw. I would recommend it to anyone looking for graphic novel memoirs or books covering the topic of cancer.

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ShansMousey
Flamer | Mike Curato
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Another great graphic novel. It follows a young boy who comes to terms with his sexuality while at his boy scout camp in the early 90s. It can be a rough read because the author does not shy away from the blatant homophobia the main character faces. I will also mention the attempted suicide at the end which can be startling for some readers but the author explained was pulled from his actual lived experience.

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ShansMousey
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This little nonfiction graphic novel does a great job introducing the concept of consent to kids. Highly recommend.

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ShansMousey
Punching the Air | Ibi Zoboi, Yusef Salaam
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Punching the Air follows sixteen-year-old Amal Shahid, an aspiring poet and artist, who after an altercation with a group of white boys in a gentrified neighborhood finds himself tried and convicted for a crime he did not commit. I really think the verse style of this book brings Amal's love for art to life. We really get to see his passion come to life in the words on the page. I recommend adding it to any display of great in-verse titles.

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ShansMousey
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Another great title from Malinda Lo. In fact I think this is her best yet. It's a historical fiction set in 1954 about Lily Hu, a Chinese American girl discovering her sexuality and falling in love. Lo went to great lengths to make sure the book was as historically accurate as possible and even includes notes in the back. It's a great look at queer and Chinese culture during the 50s. I also recommend listening to the audiobook too.

2 likes1 stack add
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ShansMousey
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This book is well deserving of its Printz award. It's beautifully written but also rife with comedic touches that makd the story's juvenile narrator feel all that more real. It's also a great book to recommend for those looking for immigrant and refugee narratives. I also highly recommend listening to the audiobook which is read by the author.

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ShansMousey
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This book started out as a series of comics for a zine that were then collected into a graphic novel. I think it's a great example of how not all coming out experiences are the same. A good book to add to any adult or teen graphic novel display.

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ShansMousey
My Rainbow | DeShanna Neal, Trinity Neal
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This a fun picture book about a little trans girl finding the right hairstyle that fits her best! It's wonderful to see more stories focused on Black LGBTQ+ characters. I also want to note that the main character is autistic which is great. I would recommend this book as a good one on one story time since it is a bit wordy and would make it hard for a crowd of little ones to pay attention to for long.

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ShansMousey
Every Body Looking | Candice Iloh
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Another great YA title in verse! The flow of the words I felt really helped capture Ada's desire to become a dancer. You could feel when she felt trapped and frustrated or when she felt happy and hopeful. I also appreciate the ambiguity at the end. We don't know if her decision to quit a class and pursue dance will pay off, but we still get a strong sense of catharsis nonetheless.

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ShansMousey
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This book made me cry. At first I didn't realize that the story was going to be dealing with the grandmother having an illness. I was very much pulled in by the magical atmosphere. I think the author did a great job weaving reality and fantasy so you weren't quite sure where one ended and the other began.

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ShansMousey
Efren Divided | Ernesto Cisneros
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Efrén Divided is 2021's Pura Belpre winner for Children's Author. It follows twelve-year-old Efrén who is determined to reunite his family after his mother is deported to Mexico. I felt the book did a good job balancing the harsh realities of the US's immigration policies alongside Efrén's school drama, deftly showing how one influences the other.

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ShansMousey
Before the Ever After | Jacqueline Woodson
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Written in verse, Before the Ever After follows the story of 10 year old ZJ who's father is a professional football player dealing with CTE after receiving one too many concussions on the field. The story explores how the changes in his father affect not only ZJ's family but ZJ's relationship with his friends. As always Woodson's poetry is wonderfully poignant. This is a great book to offer reluctant readers since it's a quick read.

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ShansMousey
The Magic Fish | Trung Le Nguyen
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The Magic Fish is about a boy and his mother connecting over fairy tales. Tiến's parents are refugees from Vietnam and use the stories to help with their English. Tiến doesn't know much Vietnamese and wants to find some way to tell his mother that he's gay. Will the stories they share be enough to break down the barrier between them? The art style is beautiful and the artist changes up the look of each tale depending on who is telling it.

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ShansMousey
Real | Takehiko Inoue
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I have never been a fan of sports manga but there's just something about the way Takehiko Inoue writes about basketball that really makes you invested. You can tell from page one how passionate he is about it. Real is about wheelchair basketball and unlike his more popular title Slam Dunk, the story is more realistic in both his art style and writing. I recommend it to any manga fan.

2 likes1 stack add
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ShansMousey
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I am so happy we finally have The Rose of Versailles in English. There are 3 volumes published with 2 more on the way in these lovely hardback editions. This manga is quintessential shojo, and one of the best selling titles in that genre. Written in 1972, the story follows Lady Oscar, a young woman raised to be a man, who serves in the French Royal Guard during the time of Marie Antionette and the French Revolution. A must read for shojo fans!

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ShansMousey
Land of the Lustrous 1 | Haruko Ichikawa
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I've been reading a lot of manga this summer. Probably my new favorite and the one I can't wait to read the next volume of is Land of the Lustrous by Haruko Ichikawa. It's a story about sentient immortal gem people who are constantly at war with strange ethereal beings that want to break the gems apart and turn them into weapons. It starts off light, but does get darker as it explores the very messy and harsh realities of change and growth.

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ShansMousey
Snapdragon | Kat Leyh
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I loved this graphic novel! It's quirky and weird and the art style is fun and expressive. If you love stories about witches and misfit kids you'll love Snapdragon.

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ShansMousey
Dewdrop | Katie O'Neill
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I love all of Katie O'Neill's graphic novels so I definitely wanted to check out her first picture book. It was cute with a positive message about doing the things you enjoy for yourself and not others. There are animal facts in the back of the book as well as a great message on the importance on water life conservation.

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ShansMousey
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The story is about a little sister looking up to her older sister who wears her hijab for the first time to school. The art style is crisp, vibrant, and expressive. And the message is so important: uplifting girls who choose to wear a hijab. It also helps childten who may not be Muslim see how beautiful and important the garment is.

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ShansMousey
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A sweet and endearing picture book about giving a lost dog a home. The whole book is wordless, but the artist's style is expressive and emotional. A must read for dog lovers!

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ShansMousey
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I loved this book! Based on which character is narrating you're supposed to move the book in different directions which is a great metaphor for how people can see the same event from different perspectives. The book also has a wonderful affirming message about living your story the way you want to. And at the end of the book is a dedication to trans and gender expansive kids. If you love Steven Universe, you'll love this book!

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ShansMousey
Other Words for Home | Jasmine Warga
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A great book to introduce middle grade children to the kinds of conflicts happening in the Middle East as well as to help teach kids of all backgrounds about the importance of empathy, tolerance, and acceptance - very vital themes - especially during our current troubling political climate. This book is also in verse and makes for a quick, lyrical read.

2 likes1 stack add
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ShansMousey
My Grandma and Me | Mina Javaherbin
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This picture book is gorgeously illustrated. It's a sweet true story about a little Iranian girl fondly talking about all the activities she does with her grandmother, from cooking to praying. There is a sweet, intimate moment between them when her grandmother prostrates herself on her prayer rug and the granddaughter lays on her grandmother's back. It's these quiet family moments that make this a wonderful story to share with your own family.

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ShansMousey
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What would you do if the government sent you each month $1000? Pay off debts, ensure your bills were in order, go back to school? Annie Lowry makes a strong case for the implementation of a universal basic income. She argues not only could it end poverty, but bridge the gender pay gap, help alleviate racial inequalities, and ensure every citizen had the power and dignity to make their own choices unburdened by financial constraints.

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ShansMousey
Ogilvy | Deborah Underwood
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I put this on hold months ago and didn't know what to expect. But it turned out to be not just a cute story about being yourself, but a subtle critique of gender norms and roles. Bunnies in dresses do one activity and bunnies in sweaters do another. But Ogilvy wants to do both. The story never genders Ogilvy, so it's not hard to read the character as nonbinary. A great addition for those looking for more subtle LGBTQ+ books for children.

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ShansMousey
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If you're looking to add more LGBTQ+ titles to your YA library collection or book display, All Out is a great choice. It features an anthology of queer historical fiction for teens spanning a wide variety of time periods and locations. All the stories in All Out are also written by queer YA authors making this a great #ownvoices pick!

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ShansMousey
Wandering Son | Shimura Takako
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Enjoy slice of life stories, cute art, and positive trans representation? Wandering Son is all 3. Follow Shuichi Nitori and Yoshino Takatsuki, a trans girl and trans boy respectively, as they navigate junior high, crushes, and the many dramas of pre-teens. 8 of the 15 volumes have been translated. Hopefully we'll get the rest in the future. It's a must have for those looking for more LGBTQ+ friendly manga.

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ShansMousey
Rocket Says Look Up! | Nathan Bryon
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This is a great book for any child who loves learning about space. The character in the book Rocket loves everything about space and astronauts and her enthusiasm is contagious. It's also a sweet little bonding story as Rocket and her older brother Jamal come together to view a meteor shower in the park.

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ShansMousey
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It's so wonderful that more and more picture books are being written with LGBTQ+ characters. This one is about a little trans boy named Aidan and how he prepares to be a new big brother. The book has a lovely art style and is keen to point out the many different ways to express gender and the importance of not assuming one's gender.

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ShansMousey
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A cute manga memoir of sorts detailing the life of the Japanese transgender author Chii. It is both autobiographical and educational as Chii spends time explaining LGBTQ+ activism and politics as well as discusses the nuances surrounding transitioning. This is a great addition to any LGBTQ+ manga collection.

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ShansMousey
The King of Kindergarten | Derrick Barnes
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This is a great picture book to add to any Back to School display in the classroom or library. The story follows a confident and friendly young boy on his first day of Kindergarten.

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ShansMousey
Leila in Saffron | Rukhsanna Guidroz
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Such a beautiful picture book about a young girl celebrating her family and Pakistani culture.

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ShansMousey
Seagull & Sea Dragon | Sydni Gregg
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Very cute story about a seagull and a seadragon meeting and becoming friends. It's a great book about making friends and trying to understand others with a different background to your own.

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ShansMousey
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For those looking for LGBTQ+ friendly manga, Our Dreams at Dusk is a must read. It follows high schooler Tasuku Kaname as he struggles with coming out. He meets a mysterious woman named Someone-san who leads him to a Drop In Center for people dealing with similar problems to Tasuku's. This manga depicts realistic LGBTQ+ characters in modern day Japan. Pick up a copy at your local library today.

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ShansMousey
Pilu of the Woods | Mai K. Nguyen
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A beautiful and heartwarming children's graphic novel that deals deftly with grief and unpleasant feelings in a way children will understand. The art style is whimsical and vibrant. It makes you want to go outside and start exploring your own backyard! The end of the book even has a section for kids to do their own nature journal! This title is a must for any kids' graphic novel collection.

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ShansMousey
Tiger vs. Nightmare | Emily Tetri
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This is a cute picture book/juvenile graphic novel about facing your fears and learning that nightmares have no hold over you. The art style is super cute and I love the designs for the monsters and nightmares. It's a great book to read with young children who may have trouble sleeping due to their own nightmares.

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ShansMousey
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I heard great things about this graphic novel and was very excited to get to read it when the library finally got it in. The art style is cute and easy to follow, the characters are really likable, and the relationship that grows between Bittle and Jack sweet and realistic. You can also tell the author really loves hockey! I am definitely looking forward to reading volume two!

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ShansMousey
Time for Bed, Miyuki | Roxane Marie Galliez
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A very beautiful picture book. It has a nice, quiet atmosphere with lovely visuals. A really great book to read to your little one before bed.

4 likes1 stack add
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ShansMousey
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A lovely book to browse through! I really enjoyed learning about a variety of different plants I hadn't heard of before. This would make a great coffee table book.

2 likes1 stack add
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ShansMousey
Sea Prayer | Khaled Hosseini
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A somber and lyrical story of a father reminiscing about his youth in Syria and the city of Homs to his son as they flee their home as refugees. While this book is categorized for adults, it can be a good book to share with teens and tweens when discussing Syrian refugees. The art style has a sort of messy quality that I think helps emphasize the father's memories of a very different past to his son's current reality.

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ShansMousey
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And so I've finished my reread of Yu-Gi-Oh! The ending is always bittersweet. In fact the first time I read it in 2004, through online fan translations, I cried. Yugi loses a dear friend. He has to say goodbye and let go. YGO was always a story about friendship. And I would be lying if I said it didn't significantly shape my own views on forming and keeping friendships. YGO isn't the best manga out there, but it's definitely one you won't forget.