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Devil in the Grove
Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America | Gilbert King
Devil in the Grove, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, is a gripping true story of racism, murder, rape, and the law. It brings to light one of the most dramatic court cases in American history, and offers a rare and revealing portrait of Thurgood Marshall that the world has never seen before. As Isabel Wilkersons The Warmth of Other Suns did for the story of Americas black migration, Gilbert Kings Devil in the Grove does for this great untold story of American legal history, a dangerous and uncertain case from the days immediately before Brown v. Board of Education in which the young civil rights attorney Marshall risked his life to defend a boy slated for the electric chairsaving him, against all odds, from being sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit.
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charl08
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Reads like a thriller. Made me want to stay up past my bedtime.

60 likes2 stack adds
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charl08

A school teacher from Mims, Florida, Harry Tyson Moore.... and some of his NAACP associates organized the Progressive Voters League, which mounted an aggressive campaign to register blacks on the voting rally in Florida. By 1948, he had brought nearly seventy thousand new black Democratic voters in the system...

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SweetP1967
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Pickpick

While this book was gripping and told an important story, there were many elements that were unsatisfying, not due to the writing but rather the facts. The legal outcome was not what I would have hoped, and the fact that a murderer remained in elected office and was never held to account for his crimes was frustrating but a reflection of reality.

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plemmdog
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Starting my February pile for Black History month. This one‘s dense and intense. Growing up in the Carolinas, my family never really considered Florida a part of the South. This book sadly shows it always was, at least in terms of injustice.

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Tomigirl44
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I read this years ago (pre-Litsy) and it‘s haunted my reality ever since. It was horrifying, appalling, eye-opening and riveting. It‘s come up in conversation over the years, and it‘s a large part of why I have no desire to go to Florida (sorry, any Floridians). And it‘s on sale for $1.99 - I think for the whole month of January! I look forward to rereading it.

Jennifer3 I read it a few years ago pre-Litsy and with a friend. Haunted is exactly how I feel. I talk to people about it and try to entice them to read it. 2y
Tomigirl44 @Jennifer3 I‘ve also encouraged people to read it in the course of our conversations; as a northerner (grew up on the Canadian border) the world I read about was so foreign to me it was hard to believe it was part of my US history. 2y
Jennifer3 @Tomigirl44 It is depressing to know how recent it was in our history but then even the last few years anger me as we‘ve made no real progress. There is just a more covert way of continuing the oppression. 2y
Tomigirl44 @Jennifer3 Yes to everything you said! What was so chilling to me is how recent this was in our history as well as blatant crimes with no punishment or consequences. And I‘ve had similar awareness of continuing discrimination especially over the past several years, having thought we‘d made such progress from those days and realizing not so much. 2y
Jennifer3 Yes, so many committed crimes with absolutely no repercussions. I can‘t believe how close Mr. Marshall came to be hanged himself in Tennessee. He wasn‘t a perfect man as none of us our perfect but what an incredibly brave and groundbreaking life he led. 2y
44 likes2 stack adds5 comments
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crazyspine
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This book has everything, mystery, history, biography. Recommend to everyone especially fans of narrative nonfiction.

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OrangeMooseReads
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I had to take this in chunks. That these things are still happening today makes it even worse.
Worth the time to read to learn and understand.

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OrangeMooseReads
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My next audiobook.
I listened to some of it today, then I needed quiet. I know that that is part of my white privileged that I can just turn off the horrors and have quiet. POC have to live these horrors everyday no matter what. They deserve quiet.

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Amiable
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Couch, cat, slippers, book. I‘ve been waiting all day for this. 🥰

Sace This picture brings me a peaceful feeling. 3y
LauraJ Me too. Counting down the minutes before work is done... 3y
Leftcoastzen Yay! 3y
60 likes3 comments
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Amiable
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As the mother of a Marine, this paragraph broke my heart. THIS is how the South treated black soldiers coming home after serving their country in war?

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Amiable
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The horrific racism and violence in this book is making me sick to my stomach. What a shameful chapter in our nation‘s history.

Addison_Reads I want to read this, but I know it's going to be tough to read. I'll have to make sure I have a lot of light reads before I attempt it. 3y
Amiable @Addison_Reads I had to stop after 100 pages and pick up a light fiction read before I could start it again. 3y
MallenNC I have this to read and this is what has kept me from starting. I agree with you both about mixing in lighter reads. 3y
Reviewsbylola I have this on my TBR. 3y
48 likes4 comments
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Amiable
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Lazy Saturday morning with a book, tea, fleecy robe and slippers. Cat apparently not included.

75 likes1 stack add
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Amiable
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When you have a reputation in your office for being “The Reader” and your colleagues leave books on your desk that they think you might like. 😀📚👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼

wanderinglynn That‘s so awesome! What great coworkers! 3y
Suet624 That‘s wonderful. 3y
Scochrane26 I‘m not sure I‘ve ever had a job where coworkers understand my love of reading. 3y
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Ruthiella Sweet!😀 3y
Amiable @Scochrane26 The best part is that they don‘t expect me to read it and report back to them. You know how you usually feel obligated to read a book someone gives you? They just leave it in my desk and say “enjoy! Or not.” 😀 3y
Amiable @wanderinglynn @Suet624 @Ruthiella I know! They are awesome. I‘m very lucky. 3y
70 likes1 stack add6 comments
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crhealey
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lauralovesbooks1
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Pickpick

So many of the stories of civil rights injustice are heartbreaking -- this one hits hard. 4 African- American men were accused of raping a young white woman -- despite an utter lack of evidence and gross physical assault by the sheriff, those that survived to trial were found guilty. This is the story of the crime, trial, and efforts by Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP to right this gross miscarriage of justice. Captivating read.

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Tamra
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A lot of American history that made me upset and reinforced gratitude & admiration for civil rights advocates. If I believed in hell, this “man” and many more should be tortured for eternity. This tragedy and miscarriage of justice is documented, but I feel so badly for all the harm done to others that was ignored and accepted. It‘s not hard to see the thread of history alive today either. 😑

GingerAntics It‘s truly scary how much history is repeating itself, and even scarier the number of people who don‘t even notice (or worse yet, deny it). 4y
74 likes5 stack adds1 comment
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Califlamingo
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Injustice after injustice after injustice after injustice. This book horrified me and made me so angry. What those boys were put through was shameful. And it was just one instance of too many at that time. The author's research was meticulous and well thought out. Everyone should read this and know about this chapter of our history.

TheEldritchProfessor Ooh, I don‘t know this title. It sounds like something I really need to read. Thanks for the rec! 5y
12 likes2 stack adds1 comment
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karenna
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#RiotGrams--day 16--black history. This book really captures the pervasive terror of Jim Crow and the tireless, brave work for justice performed by the NAACP.

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bio_chem06
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Starting my second black history month read, but of course, curling.....

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lennearb
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Horrifying to think these events happened in our country only within the last century.

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GeekGrl82
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This book covers a lot of ground. All the information was interesting, but with all the jumping around it got a little confusing.

This is a book that is worth your time. I hadn't heard of the case before & the author definitely did his research. But this is not one of those civil rights stories where justice ultimately prevails & it can be hard to take at times.

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missberlyreads
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Pickpick

This is gripping, horrifying, and tragic...another shameful chapter in US history. It's an important read.

#devilinthegrove #gilbertking #thurgoodmarshall #grovelandboys #jimcrow #racism #justice #ushistory #audible #getlit #kvnreads17

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readsusieread
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I got these three books to replace the twenty something books I unhauled ❤.

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BookishMarginalia
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The Florida State Senate on Thursday passed a bipartisan resolution apologizing for the gross miscarriage of justice against the Groveland Boys, 4 black teens wrongfully accused of raping a white teenage girl. (The Lake Country Sheriff shot 2 of the boys in cold blood while transporting them to the retrial -- that's the photo on the book cover.) interesting NYT article: https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/04/27/us/groveland-four-apology-florida.html

kspenmoll Sounds like a must read. Thanks. 6y
RealBooks4ever How did I miss this one?! Thanks for bringing it to our attention! It's going on my wish list! 6y
Theresa I read this book - listened to the audiobook, actually - last year. It's difficult to say the least, but very well done & so important. I missed the news story, so thanks for sharing it. 6y
107 likes14 stack adds3 comments
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GoneFishing

They tried to make me say that I had been with the group of fellows that raped a white woman,” Shepherd said. “It was terrible the way I was whipped, there was just knots all over me. They said they were not going to stop whipping me until I said that I was the one. I kept telling them I was in Orlando where I was. Finally, when I couldn‘t take it anymore, I said yes.” Shepherd said yes, he raped Norma Padgett, and the men dropped their hoses.

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AliSparrow
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I couldn't put it down and it was so relevant today.

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BeckyRenner
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I've been so busy with the school year starting. So I've been doing the audiobook thing. This is good book that describes an important civil rights case with clarity. The most profound thing to me though is that it's set where I live. I'm finding that it's easy to forget that injustice has happened (and in many places continues) in very familiar places.

brendanmleonard I need to read this - excited about the movie! 6y
akfreeborn I read this book a couple of years ago. I live in Florida and the history is so recent. I found the injustices alarming. I think of this book often especially when driving in and around Sumter, Lake and other inland counties. 6y
BeckyRenner @akfreeborn One of the murders I just read about happened on a road I have driven all of my life. When I heard that part, I stopped what I was doing, and I was like, Wait. What? It's a good illustration of privilege, that I haven't had to think about these things before. 🙁 6y
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BeckyRenner @brendanmleonard It's going to be a movie?! I didn't know! 6y
brendanmleonard @BeckyRenner I think it is! I may be getting it confused with other Thurgood Marshall projects. 6y
akfreeborn @BeckyRenner I can feel for you. This is not a part of history I learned much about in school and I'm sure you had no idea either even though it's where you live. My kids visit their dad in that area and I always think of the description of "the crime" and all the people that likely just went "missing" in that area. Gives me chills and I hope things are much different now. 6y
Jennifer3 I read this a couple years ago myself. Mr. Marshall and those trying to shed light on the injustices of their time sure had a lot of courage and tenacity. There were so many parts of that book that were never discussed in history classes. Phenomenal look into our history and social issues which are still occurring today but in different ways. 😞 6y
97 likes14 stack adds7 comments
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BeckyRenner

I've been so busy with the school year starting. So I've been doing the audiobook thing. This is good book that describes an important civil rights case with clarity. The most profound thing to me though is that it's set where I live. I'm finding that it's easy to forget that injustice has happened (and in many places continues) in very familiar places.

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Nikchick
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Pickpick

A gripping reminder for our "post-racial" generation that the civil rights movement was about something more than drinking fountains and seats on buses.

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MMenefee
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This is an excellent read on racial injustice. Based on a historical case, it reads like a legal thriller. Winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction.

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StephTKO
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I agree with @brendanmleonard that having a historical framework for our society's problems is part of the path to meaningful change. This is one of the best books I've ever read in my lifetime. You will be moved. You will be outraged. This should be required reading.

BookishFeminist ❤️ Agreed, this is a stellar book. I might reread soon. 6y
28 likes10 stack adds1 comment