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#Orwell
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Fez223
Why I Write | George Orwell
Pickpick

Insightful

blurb
Billypar
A Collection of Essays | George Orwell
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#IllRemember #MOvember
Just read the Orwell essay 'Such, Such Were the Joys' about the horrors of attending an English boarding school before the first World War. The living conditions were deplorable, but he also talks about the importance of remembering how children see the world to put the psychological impact of the authority his teachers wielded, and other aspects of the class divide into context.
@Cinfhen

Billypar Great essay, though weird to see 'it' used as the pronoun of choice for a child. 2mo
Cinfhen That is disturbing!!! But it‘s Orwell 😉 2mo
Cinfhen Vinny, I just wanted to just say how much I‘ve enjoyed your posts over the YEARS!!! I‘m stepping down from hosting the daily challenges but I‘m still here on Litsy😁My TBR thanks you for taking the journey with me ♥️ 2mo
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Suet624 I‘m always surprised that adults can‘t relate to the horrors of childhood and put themselves in the child‘s situation. 2mo
Billypar @Cinfhen Thanks Cindy: I've had so much fun with this challenge. It was the first activity I tried on Litsy and it was the main thing that introduced me to all the fantastic people here. I also had a great time seeing everyone in person at the Philly meet-up and co-hosting #Nofemmeber Looking forward to participating in future Litsy events with you, starting with #BelowZer00s in January! 2mo
Billypar @Suet624 Definitely. Orwell describes a lot of horrific conditions, but towards the end he speculates that even if those have improved over the years, it's likely that a lot of the social aspects of exclusion and discrimination still persist. Unfortunately he's probably right for the 1950s or 2019. 2mo
Suet624 Agreed. 2mo
Cinfhen It‘s been a fun ride and we‘re still going strong 💪🏼 2mo
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review
NeedsMoreBooks
Difficult Women | David Plante
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Panpan

This was a difficult read but I am glad that I completed it. It shows the lives of three women with whom Plante spent time: Jean Rhys in her old age, Sonia Orwell who was George Orwell‘s wife, and Germaine Greer. I did not like the portrayals. Also it seemed a list of people drinking too much alcohol, being too sad, selfish, and angry, and a lot of traveling and partying. The privilege of the three seemed too much for me. #NFNov

Clwojick 6 pt 2mo
NeedsMoreBooks @Clwojick thank you! 2mo
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GatheringBooks
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TheEllieMo
The Road to Wigan Pier | George Orwell
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Pickpick

Part 1 of this book describes life in the slum dwellings of industrialised towns in the 1930s, and the typical life of a mining community, and is quite an education - miners usually ended up with blue scars because coal dust would get into their cuts before they healed - who knew?!

Part 2 is a lengthy essay in why Orwell believed we should all become socialists and why he thought we weren‘t.

TheEllieMo It‘s interesting, particularly with the benefit of over 80 years of hindsight, to see how things have changed since the book was written, but also how some things haven‘t changed at all. Plus ça change, plus c‘est la même chose. (edited) 3mo
TheEllieMo I did have some issues with the book; there is some blatant racism towards the indigenous populations of some of the former British Colonies (India and Burma in particular); while Orwell, who considered himself middle-class, did not consider himself better than the working-classes, he very much considered himself to be better than a Burmese. And even towards the “working classes”, he can sound very condescending. 3mo
32 likes2 comments
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TheEllieMo
The Road to Wigan Pier | George Orwell
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Picking up on the brilliant idea from @Cinfhen here‘s my #WeeklyForecast. Orwell and Lenny Henry need to be back at the library soon and The Order of the Day is for book club next Tuesday, so I need to crack on with all three!

CarolynM I only just heard about Lenny Henry's memoir! I need to get myself a copy. I look forward to your thought on it. 3mo
Cinfhen Yup, nothing like lighting a fire under the rug (or bookclub )to get oneself motivated 😹Happy reading 3mo
38 likes2 comments
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TheEllieMo
The Road to Wigan Pier | George Orwell
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“You and I and the editor of the Times Literary Supplement and the Nancy poets and the Archbishop of Canterbury and Comrade X, author of ‘Marxism for Infants‘ - all of us really owe the comparative decency of our lives to poor dredges underground, blackened to the eyes, with their throats full of coal dust, driving their shovels forward with arms and belly muscles of steel”

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Thndrstd
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Pickpick


Part autobiography, part fiction, Orwell writes movingly but without sentiment about homelessness as he meets assorted down-and-out characters as he moves through Paris and Lond0n. Orwell's writing is always insightful and keenly observed, but not without humor.

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arlenefinnigan
The Road to Wigan Pier | George Orwell
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Pickpick

This is fascinating. The accounts of the lives of the northern working class in the 1930s are a real eye opener. His reflections on class politics are interesting – some of the language is very ‘of its time‘,although his criticism of colonialism is progressive. His grumpiness about technology is hilariously outdated, and his hatred of vegetarians is amusingly daft. Overall it‘s a really thoughtful, well researched piece of political journalism.

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Wellreadhead
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Pickpick
pdever A good friend keeps recommending this one ... Sounds good 5mo
Wellreadhead @pdever Very enlightening! 5mo
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