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Two Hours
Two Hours: The Quest to Run the Impossible Marathon | Ed Caesar
13 posts | 4 read | 1 to read
Just published to extraordinary acclaim in Britain as Hoop Dreams for runners (The Spectator) and a celebration of the human spirit (The Observer), Two Hours is the first book from a blazing new talent who has established himself as perhaps the best new long-form magazine writer since the arrival of John Jeremiah Sullivan (The Guardian) and whose reportage has the wonderfully old-fashioned feel of the very best of American journalism (The Sunday Times). Two hours to cover twenty-six miles and 385 yards. It is runnings Everest, a feat once seen as impossible for the human body. But now we can glimpse the mountaintop. The sub-two hour marathon will require an exceptional combination of speed, mental strength, and endurance. The pioneer will have to endure more, live braver, plan better, and be luckier than anyone who has run before. So who will it be? In this spellbinding book, journalist Ed Caesar takes us into the world of elite marathoners: some of the greatest runners on earth. Through the stories of these rich characters, like Kenyan Geoffrey Mutai, around whom the narrative is built, Caesar traces the history of the marathon as well as the science, physiology, and psychology involved in running so fast for so long. And he shows us why this most democratic of races retains its brutal, enthralling appealand why we are drawn to test ourselves to the limit. Two Hours is a book about a beautiful sport few people understand. It takes us from big-money races in the United States and Europe to remote villages in Kenya. Its about talent, heroism, and refusing to accept defeat. It is a book about running that is about much more than running. It is a human drama like no other.
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review
keithmalek
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This book poses the question of whether or not we will ever see a marathon run in two hours or less. It was published in 2015. In 2019, Eliud Kipchoge became the first to do so with a time of 1:59:40. But even if this milestone has already been reached, this book is still interesting and worth reading.

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keithmalek
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With a name like Dick Pound, you would assume that he would be a porn star, not a lawyer.🤣

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keithmalek
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KT1432 How is that possible?! I would freeze lol! I think I‘m going to read this for a challenge prompt a book about athletes. 5mo
keithmalek @KT1432 In that case, instead of reading this, I suggest that you read "A Race Like No Other: 26.2 Miles Through the Streets of New York" by Liz Robbins. 5mo
KT1432 Ah thanks for the recommendation I‘ll look that one up! 5mo
keithmalek @KT1432 Keep in mind that the elite runners are moving VERY fast. You might freeze, but I can assure you that they would not. 5mo
KT1432 That makes sense! 5mo
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keithmalek
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keithmalek
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🤣 If I ever run a marathon, I'm going to do this.

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keithmalek
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keithmalek
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keithmalek
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keithmalek
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keithmalek
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keithmalek
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blurb
Andrew65
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It‘s 2 am and I am at 2 hours for the #24in48 #readathon. A good start but time for some sleep so awake enough tomorrow to continue. So far been reading The Pillars Of The Earth. Goodnight! 😴

Rachbb3 Are you in Europe? Lol. 6y
Andrew65 UK. 6y
64 likes2 comments
review
KS1805
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This book was captivating. There was a lot of really great running information and Geoffrey Mutai's story anchored the larger narrative. But, this book would have been better had a Kenyan would have written it. The book itself read at times like one long microaggression which is why I gave it three stars instead of five. I can't put my finger on it but there was a condescending tone and the narrative played toward Western biases.