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A Bound Woman Is a Dangerous Thing
A Bound Woman Is a Dangerous Thing: The Incarceration of African American Women from Harriet Tubman to Sandra Bland | DaMaris Hill
A Publishers Weekly Top 10 History Title for the season A revelatory work in the tradition of Claudia Rankine's Citizen, DaMaris Hill's searing and powerful narrative-in-verse bears witness to American women of color burdened by incarceration. "It is costly to stay free and appear / sane." From Harriet Tubman to Assata Shakur, Ida B. Wells to Sandra Bland and Black Lives Matter, black women freedom fighters have braved violence, scorn, despair, and isolation in order to lodge their protests. In A Bound Woman Is a Dangerous Thing, DaMaris Hill honors their experiences with at times harrowing, at times hopeful responses to her heroes, illustrated with black-and-white photographs throughout. For black American women, the experience of being bound has taken many forms: from the bondage of slavery to the Reconstruction-era criminalization of women; from the brutal constraints of Jim Crow to our own era's prison industrial complex, where between 1980 and 2014, the number of incarcerated women increased by 700%.* For those women who lived and died resisting the dehumanization of confinement--physical, social, intellectual--the threat of being bound was real, constant, and lethal. In A Bound Woman Is a Dangerous Thing, Hill presents bitter, unflinching history that artfully captures the personas of these captivating, bound yet unbridled African-American women. Hill's passionate odes to Zora Neale Hurston, Lucille Clifton, Fannie Lou Hamer, Grace Jones, Eartha Kitt, and others also celebrate the modern-day inheritors of their load and light, binding history, author, and reader in an essential legacy of struggle. *(The Sentencing Project)
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TieDyeDude
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Mehso-so

As someone who is not opposed to, but does not typically read, poetry, I thought this was okay. The poems were good overall. I would have liked more from the introductions of the women. Some were just vague impressions of the women; most didn't even mention their incarceration. I found it difficult to connect with the poetry when I knew so little about the subjects. Still, some of the poems are so powerful regardless of the context.

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Kristy_K
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Pickpick

I don‘t think my words will accurately sum up this collection of poems better than how the autor herself does. Hill opens her preface by saying that reading these poems “will not comfort.” She goes on to say later that these “poems are love letters.” And in between that, she asked herself “what will my tears record today?” I felt and I saw all that and more while I read each poem.

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TieDyeDude
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TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!!! 4w
44 likes1 comment
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JenniferEgnor
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Pickpick

What a powerful read. You can read it within an hour, and then again, and again. It is a chronicle of Black women who were incarcerated; each chapter starts off with a summary, and ends in poetry that tells the story of their lives and their struggles. What are the stories of the Black Womxn in your life? Highly recommended. Shown: one of the most beautiful peoplx I know, who has taught me so much. They are doing community work in Texas.

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SamAnne
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Pickpick

Wow. What a powerful book. Sent me into a deep dive on history to learn about amazing women I‘ve not heard about before. @WanderingBookaneer @TheBookKeepers @rachelm I have so appreciated the poets you have introduced me to!!!! The past few years I‘ve been incorporating more poetry into my life. And Rachel—apologies—Coco sent me two books in one package and I mailed the later read to you. I will get this one in the mail to you tomorrow.

KVanRead Sounds great! 3y
WanderingBookaneer I‘m glad you liked it. I spent most of my reading time Googling these women. I was also impressed by the author‘s vocabulary. I had to look up a few definitions as well. (edited) 3y
WanderingBookaneer I ended up buying copies of all the books for myself. ☺️ 3y
69 likes3 comments
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TheBookKeepers
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@WanderingBookaneer this arrived today! I absolutely loved the goodies you included - thank you!! #lmpbc @SamAnne @rachelm

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BkClubCare
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20 likes1 stack add
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derr.liz
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"History told him that he could squeeze gold from black women‘s wrists with iron cuffs. Is that why he braided the noose to resemble a lasso?"

#blackhistorymonth

6 likes1 stack add
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mrozzz
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I feel like it wouldn‘t be Sunday without a #LibraryHaul 🤓

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amma-keep-reading
Pickpick

I loved, loved, loved this book! Part memoir, part ode/tribute to her ancestors and mentors and very thoroughly researched and curated, this book is truly memorable. I had the privilege of attending a reading by the author and it made me appreciate the work and vulnerability it took to create. Highly recommend.

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Dorianna
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Pickpick

This book is a mix of history, poetry, and memoir/poetry mainly about the history of criminalizing black women in history and raising a black son with the realities of police brutality. It‘s a very quick read but still very informative and powerful.

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Dorianna
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The author has been quoting from the book Colored Amazons: Crime, Violence, and Black Women in the City of Brother Love, 1880-1910 by Kali N. Gross, Ph.D before many of her poems and so far I have learned that I must read this book.

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TJReads
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“Between 1980 and 2014 the number of incarcerated women increased by more than 700%” -The Sentencing Project

12 likes2 stack adds
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Hornsby78
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For your TBR lists featuring Black History Month in February. From @Bookpage. The author of the review is Vanessa Willoughby.

6 likes1 stack add
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balletbookworm
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Pickpick

I inadvertently finished my first #ReadHarder2019 task - poetry collection pubbed after 2014 - because the flap copy for this book doesn‘t mention that DaMaris Hill‘s responses are in poetry form! 🙀 (well, the Claudia Rankine comp should have clued me in, maybe) And they are STUNNING. Each one is for a Black woman “bound” by incarceration, whether enslavement, racism, Jim Crow, misogyny, or the modern prison-industrial complex. Highly recommend.

Leftcoastzen Nice review! 5y
balletbookworm The highlight of this book is a poem cycle for Ida B. Wells that is presented first as a mathematical or logic equation then translated into poems. (edited) 5y
Chrissyreadit @Chelleo this may be a title relevant to your swap. I stacked it based on the review! 5y
Chelleo @Chrissyreadit this would be a great title for the #blitsyhistorymonth swap! Thanks for the tag! 5y
balletbookworm Yay!! Thank you both @Chrissyreadit and @Chelleo 🎉 5y
21 likes4 stack adds5 comments