Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
balletbookworm

balletbookworm

Joined February 2016

Books and cats! balletbookworm.wordpress.com
review
balletbookworm
Celestial Bodies | Jokha Alharthi
post image
Pickpick

A beautifully-translated novel comprised of linked vignettes (best descriptor I have since the narrative is only vaguely linear with many narrators/points-of-view), the first by an Omani woman to be translated to English and the first Arabic-language winner of the International Man Booker. There are a LOT of characters and the narrative shifts back and forth in time, but they‘re all so interesting, especially the sisters Mayya, Asma, and Khawla.

review
balletbookworm
Every Heart a Doorway | Seanan McGuire
post image
Pickpick

Fun and compulsively readable, much darker than I was expecting (for some reason I was expecting funnier, idk). It ended differently than I expected so definitely looking forward to more books in this series.

The audiobook narrator was excellent.

14 likes1 stack add
review
balletbookworm
Out Loud: A Memoir | Mark Morris, Wesley Stace
post image
Pickpick

I particularly enjoy Mark Morris‘s acerbic tone - he likes what he likes, he has opinions about art and the art form, and he doesn‘t care if you like him or not for these opinions. I also liked how honest he was in this memoir regarding the ups and downs of a career in the performing arts - read this for both the history of MMDG as a modern dance company and also for the work it takes to start and maintain a dance company.

review
balletbookworm
The Testaments: A Novel | Margaret Atwood
post image
Mehso-so

3.5 rolled up to 4 since I did like the writing and overall book as a whole. But where The Handmaid‘s Tale had bared teeth and outrage The Testaments doesn‘t really give us new ground. We get a lot of pedantic nuts-and-bolts about how Gilead came about and more detail about day-to-day women‘s lives. Dirty secrets, double-dealing as expected. But it is readable and I did enjoy it. (And mild spoiler, there is an epilogue from the Gilead symposium).

balletbookworm And imo, you can read this without having read The Handmaid‘s Tale, although you should really read that one anyway. Atwood sidesteps a direct sequel to Offred‘s story here by choosing different narrators, although if you‘re paying attention you can easily pick out the links to the earlier book (meaning I guessed all the “twists” in the plot). 2w
15 likes1 comment
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

A so-so rolled up to 🤘🏻- I did snort-laugh many times. If you like Ali Wong‘s stand-up, this continues a lot of jokes and themes from her specials (she does a lot of raunch humor about body fluids and sex but also does a lot of jokes about the grossness of pregnancy/motherhood that kind of gets swept under the rug). The format of letters to her daughters is a little odd since they‘re quite small now but it does make some of the pieces endearing.

balletbookworm I didn‘t quite get the necessity of the Afterword from her husband; it was nice, but tonally weird. There is also a joke that occurs late in one of the last chapters which perpetuates the stereotype of multiple personality disorder and violence which is very 😬😬😬. 4w
20 likes1 comment
review
balletbookworm
This post contains spoilers
show me
post image
Mehso-so

Three stars: the end of this book is really overstuffed with A LOT; Georgiana has to ditch her fiancée, receive several info dumps about how dudes are keeping information from her bc she‘s a “lady”, get with Rob, deal with her decidedly awful brother, AND foil the slave trade (which, yes foil slave trade=good)
Four stars: an amnesia plot that doesn‘t have consent issues and doesn‘t revolve around “punishing” the person who has lost their memory

balletbookworm I do love Caro‘s writing but I missed the two previous books in this series and so I think there was a bit of shorthand with the Vega Club/characters I was missing in the reading. So a fun read but you might want to catch up with the series. 1mo
5 likes1 comment
review
balletbookworm
Bloodlust & Bonnets | Emily McGovern
post image
Pickpick

A goofy send-up of both the Regency and paranormal romance genres. McGovern takes a lot of potshots at genres tropes, to the point that the book is perhaps overstuffed to the detriment of the plot. It has a lot of the same energy and humor that Nimona brought to the table, tho this is not a YA graphic novel (some swearing and one nekkid succubus) - the creator also originated the “My Life as a Background Slytherin” webcomic.

19 likes1 stack add
review
balletbookworm
post image
Mehso-so

Cute. Five stars for the cute cat pictures, four stars for humor, three stars for the actual poems (they‘re fine).

review
balletbookworm
Last Letters: The Prison Correspondence 1944-45 | Helmuth Caspar von Moltke, Johannes von Moltke, Dorothea von Moltke
post image
Pickpick

This is not an easy book to read - it‘s a collection of letters between a couple that expected almost daily that he would be executed by the Nazis and contain minute details of Helmuth‘s defense and Freya‘s visits to various officials to try and get Helmuth released, so they do get a bit repetitive when read all at once. But their discussions of faith, love, reminiscences about their children, heart-felt farewells in each letter are truly moving.

balletbookworm Each of these letters was smuggled into and out of Tegel prison by the prison chaplain, at risk to his own life. And it does make one wonder if one could place themselves at risk, knowing the stakes, if in the same situation the von Moltkes and their friends were in during WWII. 1mo
balletbookworm This is the first time these letters have been available in English - Freya chose not to allow the letters to be published until after her death in 2010 and in reading them you understand why. They are incredibly intimate letters. We are so lucky they were preserved. 1mo
BookishClaire wow... 1mo
20 likes1 stack add3 comments
review
balletbookworm
Trick Mirror | Jia Tolentino
post image
Pickpick

A good collection of long-form essays (nothing wrong with a short hot-take, but a well-researched and laid out essay is becoming rare), all dealing with the ways in which feminism and femininity are packaged and served to us. Our yoga pants, our television shows, the internet, our relationships, our celebrities. Outstanding essays include “We Are Old Virginia” and “The Cult of the Difficult Woman.”

23 likes1 stack add
review
balletbookworm
Trick Mirror | Jia Tolentino
post image
Pickpick

A good collection of long-form essays (nothing wrong with a short hot-take, but a well-researched and laid out essay is becoming rare), all dealing with the ways in which feminism and femininity are packaged and served to us. Our yoga pants, our television shows, the internet, our relationships, our celebrities. Outstanding essays include “We Are Old Virginia” and “The Cult of the Difficult Woman.”

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

The library audio was available - they got a second narrator to read the longer diary excerpts and shed used a Yorkshire accent, so we got to hear something approaching Anne Lister‘s own accent. It‘s a wee bit boring in places, since this is book concentrating on letters and a diary so it is hard for the biographer to “plot” the book. However, Anne is a fascinating contradiction of a woman as this is an excellent companion to the TV series.

review
balletbookworm
The Stonewall Reader | New York Public Library
post image
Pickpick

A small but very diverse anthology centered on LGBTQ+ experiences before, during, and after the Stonewall riots of 1969. It took a bit to read because the structure of some pieces wasn‘t straightforward (there is a long, dense stream-of-consciousness piece by Jill Johnston that is a prime example). But the collection highlights how Stonewall came about, how far we‘ve come as a society in the intervening 50 years, and how far we still have to go.

20 likes2 stack adds
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

Time travel across multiverse and millennia is the feature but the real point of this book is the relationship between Red and Blue, rival, skilled operatives on opposite sides of a war. Blue opens a daring, mocking correspondence in the aftermath of a bloody battle, Red counters, grudging admiration and challenge. Soon, they are confiding secrets in an ever-more dangerous exchange until they cannot extricate themselves.

balletbookworm Without giving away the ending, I have to say that I kept thinking of the Liebestod from Wagner‘s Tristan und Isolde as well as the letters of Abelard and Heloise.

The audio production is indeed superb. The two narrators are perfectly chosen for their respective parts and the reading speed was just right.
1mo
balletbookworm Also, this not a hard SF novel, so if you‘re looking for a nuts-and-bolts time travel novel, this won‘t be it. 1mo
18 likes2 comments
review
balletbookworm
Inland | Ta Obreht
post image
Mehso-so

Finally finished, which I had to since I‘m the book club leader tonight.

Téa Obreht‘s lovely sentences saved this “novel” - which was comprised of two drastically different, cheaply foreshadowed, novellas that converged (finally) at the end of the book. In my opinion, she should have chosen either Nora‘s story or Lurie‘s story and developed an emotionally compelling, complete story. I found neither compelling. I would like to talk to her editor.

balletbookworm Content warning for racism toward non-white people on the page, particularly Native Americans (extremely to-period but it isn‘t easy to read). 1mo
ManyWordsLater Sounds more like a 👎 to me! 1mo
balletbookworm @ManyWordsLater I was wavering, seriously. She does have gorgeous sentences. I really have to hate on something to give it the 👎🏻 tho. 1mo
Hooked_on_books “I would like to talk to her editor.” I love it! 😆 I straight panned this, but I think you are absolutely right about choosing one storyline and expanding it. There were moments in this book where I thought it was about to get really good, which suggests potential to me, but it never happened. I was sorely disappointed. 1mo
15 likes4 comments
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

A very thoughtful examination of why and how we listen to classical music (and what defines “classical” music) from an experienced conductor. I really loved the ideas about how to program a concert, what works, what doesn‘t, and how certain works become well-known. Would have liked a list of suggested recordings to listen to, since this would be a tough book to read if one doesn‘t have a decent background in classical music.

balletbookworm (I‘d also like to remind Mauceri that classical music does not have exclusive rights to being performed without electronically-provided sound; pop music, country, rap, etc can all be performed acoustically) 2mo
14 likes1 comment
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

4.5 of 5. Gorgeous and devastating. (But could I have a few paragraph breaks please? 😂)

20 likes2 stack adds
review
balletbookworm
post image
Mehso-so

Eh, kind of boring. If you haven‘t read the work the party comes from you‘re a bit lost for context and if you have then you disagree with the author‘s analysis *cough*Mansfield Park*cough*

But I read it and now it can go in the library donation bin.

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

A comprehensive look at the rise of fentanyl, fentanyl derivatives, and the myriad designer drugs/novel psychoactive substances that have come in their wake. This is the next step in the opioid crisis, since the street heroin addicts have turned to is often cut with varying and dangerous amounts of fentanyls, often with tragic results. Westhoff met with manufacturers in China, makers of safe-testing kits in Europe, and researched the Dark Web.

18 likes2 stack adds
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

After snarfing down the two novels, I picked up this novella prequel. The “oral history” format really lends itself well to what is an extended infodump of all the information it would be impossible to cram into the first book. Also, since I am an epidemiologist I was DELIGHTED with the way Scalzi played with the science of the Haden‘s outbreak.

Thus concludes my binge through the extant Lock In series. ;)

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

A wonderfully solid and wide-ranging anthology of fiction, poetry, memoir, and personal essay on the subject of migration, whether voluntary or involuntary. The pieces are diverse geographically and chronologically (the earliest works are from eighteenth-century writers and enslaved persons Olaudah Equiano and Phyllis Wheatley and the more recent are migrations from the Middle East and mid-2000s green card worries).

balletbookworm My only complaint is that for excerpts of longer pieces (like from Zadie Smith‘s White Teeth) there isn‘t much context to orient the reader. The Additional Reading/Watching section at the back is excellent. 2mo
18 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
balletbookworm
Head on | John Scalzi
post image
Pickpick

4.5 of 5 stars. Not quite as immersive as Lock In but still compulsively readable - I really liked the introduction of franchise sports as a way to drive the crime procedural plot forward. And the humor. It scratches a few of those Thursday Next itches I have. If Scalzi wanted to make this an ongoing series I would totally read it.

Took me two books to figure out that Chris, being a first-person narrator, is never referred to in any gendered way.

review
balletbookworm
Lock In (Lock In, #1) | John Scalzi
post image
Pickpick

A compulsively readable cyberpunk FBI thriller. I loved how he pushed the tech to the edge and beyond it but also made it seem relevant (the debate about “freeing” Hadens felt very similar to debates about cochlear implants, etc). The world-building is also effortlessly diverse. Onto the next book!

22 likes1 stack add
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

Funny and fact-filled. The reading level feels very middle grade and up, so the tinier morbid humans may need a little help when reading, but a lot of the information here was new to me so even adults will get a lot out of it.

Plus the illustrations are excellent.

review
balletbookworm
Three Part Harmony | Holley Trent
post image
Pickpick

It took me a bit to get into this one - I hadn‘t read the first book and Raleigh is a bit of an acquired taste. But after about 40 pages, once the three MCs are squared the plot chugs right along. Interestingly, this is a rather medium-steamy ménage romance; there are some sex scenes but not intimately described (if you‘re looking for HAWT threesomes by Chapter 2 this book is not for you).

balletbookworm It‘s mostly three people who manage to figure out by the end of the book that they love each other and function best as a unit (and that their families are all garbage; I would add a mild CW for references to past trouble with families who are not supportive of queer or neurodiverse people.) Good writing. 2mo
14 likes1 comment
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

A sweet and funny book of personal essays (and lists) about being the type of person who worries a lot and tends to give everyone the benefit of the doubt (even sketchy dudes giving you a dog and the Patriots bc your grandma was a fan). Standout pieces include “You Don‘t Know, Now You Know” (becoming a rap fan), “The Thanksgiving Dragon”, “The Three True Stories of How We Met” (awwww 💖), & “Bizzy” (y‘all, if you don‘t follow @bizzythepug on IG...

balletbookworm ...your life has less snorty, pizza-begging pugs in it). The book ends with “Don‘t Let the Bastards Grind You Down” which is a call to just try and do your best and put a little back into the world when it feels like everything is going to burn down around you. Out in September. 2mo
20 likes1 comment
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

I picked this up bc I was interested in her reporting/research on religion/faith in the Midwest (I am 100% a city kid from Cedar Rapids, IA, where Lyz now lives). She does a great job in tying to get inside that mythos of “midwesterners are the salt of the earth and the real backbone of the US”, the cognitive dissonance of faith and politics, but she ties much of it to her search for a faith community that did not make her feel small/unwelcome.

balletbookworm I think she also did a fantastic job of presenting all her subjects fairly and with depth and avoided othering or making any of them the boogeyman which is hard when being “politically neutral” is impossible. (I had a chuckle in the chapter where she attends the ELCA pastor conference and I was like “those are my people! High five” 😂) 2mo
17 likes2 stack adds1 comment
review
balletbookworm
Dreaming of You | Lisa Kleypas
post image
Pickpick

I am late to the Lisa Kleypas party - when I was getting back into romance she didn‘t pop onto my radar. But I‘ve been backtracking through her backlist very slowly - and YES, Derek Craven is a LOT. I can see why Sarah MacLean cites this book as a favorite and where her Scoundrels and Bastards come from. Sara is pretty fun and it was nice to see her decide that she‘s not going to be a “good girl” and confine herself to a predefined role.

balletbookworm Now I need to read Lily and Alex‘s book. 2mo
bunny I'll have to check this one out! I just read (and loved) my first Lisa Kleypas too. 2mo
16 likes1 stack add2 comments
review
balletbookworm
post image
Mehso-so

4 stars for content: arranged in an interesting format so that different filmmakers‘ quotes about different aspects of video store culture seemed to be in conversation with each other. I would have liked a few more perspectives from people other than directors/distributors like critics, actors, archivists, etc.
2 stars for the physical book: not entirely the author‘s fault bc the original publisher went belly-up before publication...

balletbookworm but the ink quality and layout of my copy from Createspace was really shoddy 2mo
14 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
balletbookworm
The Nickel Boys: A Novel | Colson Whitehead
post image
Pickpick

4.5 stars rounded to a full 5 because so much is packed into this little book. It didn‘t wreck me like The Underground Railroad - I was a mess by the end of that book. This one was more quietly devastating. Whitehead didn‘t pull his punches but instead slipped them around from behind. The violence doesn‘t hit you in the face, it stabs you in the back. I also thought a lot about Ava DuVernay‘s When They See Us, currently streaming on Netflix.

review
balletbookworm
post image
Mehso-so

A book I had hanging around the house and found in Libby so I could get it read. This is fine. Some funny bits, some awkward bits. The essays tend to ramble a lot in the middle. Crosley also does the narration which is so slow it doesn‘t sound like normal speech until about 1.5x speed.

quote
balletbookworm
Dragons Love Tacos | Adam Rubin
post image

Happy belated #bookloversday from the bookshelf critters in my office!

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

Wow. Not a word wasted, not a word out of place. A beautiful, spare, rich memoir about being black and gay and how little space is given to those men as they grow from childhood to adulthood. Internalized self-loathing is so common among these pages that I can‘t even imagine the work Saeed must have done to be able to bare those emotions for the reader. The book is also a love letter to his late mother, those last few chapters cut me to the quick.

balletbookworm A must-read, out this October. 2mo
MicheleinPhilly SOLD! 2mo
17 likes3 stack adds2 comments
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

A well-written essay collection about living as a disabled woman of color - how these intersections affect personal relationships, self-worth, internalized ableism, seeing one‘s self (or not, as is the case) in books, film, and TV, and mental health. She writes bravely about self-destructive thoughts and the plan to end her own life in a way we don‘t often “allow” in disability lit. She credits books by Sarah Dessen/Toni Morrison in helping her.

balletbookworm Brown has a refreshing, direct but conversational style. A writer to watch. 3mo
tholmz Loved this one! 2mo
20 likes2 stack adds2 comments
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

Lovely but short even for a novella. Cat‘s first historical f/f for Avon contains the story of Molly the streetwise housemaid (we‘ve met her before) and Alice the cast-off vicar‘s daughter. While on the way to an HEA without relationship miscommunication or reluctance to acknowledge love the two ladies show a couple of awful dudes where to get off. Love the cover.

review
balletbookworm
When You Read This | Mary Adkins
post image
Pickpick

The narrator handled reading of all the email/text technical stuff well, although she was a very slow reader (sounded normal sped up to 1.5x). The portions of the book from Iris‘s blog had the best writing/character development - there are “posts” that are breathtakingly beautiful - which made the other characters extremely 2D until Jade and Smith really started “talking” to one another. Carl, the intern, was very much an over-the-top parody.

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

I guess this counts as a book? (I would have read a printed version of this course bc it sounded interesting, so I‘m counting it! 😌)

A very good overview of utopian and dystopian literature from Sir Thomas More‘s 16th century Utopia through the 21st century‘s The Hunger Fames. Pamela Bedore is a very engaging lecturer. BUT I disliked how often “I‘m not going to spoil the ending” was uttered. It really limited the scope of some of the lectures.

review
balletbookworm
Ksebier Takes Berlin | Gabriele Tergit
post image
Pickpick

A dry, satirical look at the Berlin intelligentsia and upper class of 1930 and what happens when a mediocre Jewish Everyman becomes an overnight cabaret sensation (look, it was a slow news day). Tergit skewers the capitalist drive to make as much money as possible off the hot shit for the moment - a drive that still exists in ever-increasing amounts of media tie-in rubbish and branding in the 21st century.

balletbookworm An interesting book for me to read and contrast with the Germany of Fritz Lang‘s M (a favorite movie) and Isherwood‘s Berlin Stories. 3mo
15 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
balletbookworm
post image
Mehso-so

Middling, for me. Time Song is a book that tries to do many things - an anthropological exploration of Doggerland, a memoir of the author‘s fascination with artifacts and anthropology of older human culture, and a collection of poems (Time Songs) inspired by paleontologic and anthropologic scientific works - and doesn‘t quite grasp any of them. The drawn maps weren‘t easy to read or orient. Nice sentence-level writing, though.

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

Book 5 for #24in48! An enjoyable work of true crime/history read by Kate Reading. I‘d known a bit about the Affair of the Poisons (Nancy Mitford covers a bit in The Sun King but waaaay dishier) but this is a more in depth account of the Paris Chief of Police La Renier and his involvement. There are a LOT of historical figures introduced very quickly. If you‘re not familiar with 17th century French history you may want to brush up on it beforehand.

review
balletbookworm
The Vexations | Caitlin Horrocks
post image
Pickpick

Book 4 finished for July 24in48.

This is a very intimate novel about the life of Erik Satie and his sister, brother, and two friends who new him well. The writing is beautiful, particularly in those chapters from Satie‘s perspective talking about “touch” or music, and Horrocks described the Montmartre Satie inhabited so well. The chapters from his sister Louise‘s perspective are interesting; they are the only ones told in 1st person...

balletbookworm I think I figured out why the author made that choice but I don‘t quite think it was needed. 3mo
17 likes1 comment
review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

This. Book. Is. Wild.

Jordy Rosenberg has given us a novel that is at once a purported seventeenth century memoir/narrative, that morphs into a rallying cry against the commoditization of bodies, of prison abolition, of anti-colonialism, of anti-racism, of trans self-determination. Surrounding this is a framing narrative in footnotes of the professor annotating this tale and his fight against a university increasingly...

#24in48

balletbookworm beholden to shady corporate and pharmaceutical interests, veering from Sterne-ean to Vonnegut-like levels of absurdity. A very complex book but well-worth the read. 3mo
25 likes1 stack add1 comment
review
balletbookworm
Pretty Face | Lucy Parker
post image
Pickpick

Book 2 done for July 2019 24in48 readathon!

I really loved this second book in the London Celebrities series. Lucy Parker really takes aim at the shit actresses have to deal in the acting profession. Luc and Lily are great characters. I‘ll admit to being a bit nervous about the age difference but it is handled so well. Also nice to see Lainie and Richard in a short scene (Richard gives great advice when he remembers to not be an actual git.)

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

Book 1 down for July 2019 24in48 Readathon!

Much parody, very satire. (Y‘all, if you don‘t understand what the @guyinmyMFA twitter account is about you wont understand this book.)

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

A fun yet still academic examination of Austen fan culture. I really appreciated Chapter 2 about the adaptation of Austen‘s Emma into the movie Clueless (total Betty!). Good chapters at the end about Austen and LGBTQ+ themes/ships. It‘s a little short, I would have liked a few more chapters poking into more crevices.

19 likes1 stack add
review
balletbookworm
Mrs. Everything | Jennifer Weiner
post image
Pickpick

3.5 stars. I liked this, especially the relationship between Jo and Bethie and how women‘s roles have changed (or not changed) in the latter years of the 20th century. But it felt very draggy to me, with some parts rendered so beautifully early in the book and then others very slapdash later in the book. Could have used some balance in the narrative pacing.

Read for BN Book Club

26 likes1 stack add
review
balletbookworm
Act Like It | Lucy Parker
post image
Pickpick

I really enjoyed this fake relationship plot btw a good-natured, publicly-minded actress (Lainie) and a grouchy, patrician, git of an actor (Richard) who have to start appearing to be an item so ticket sales for the play they‘re in won‘t tank. So much good banter and a look inside the theatre world of West End London. I liked how Richard softens but doesn‘t entirely lose his “people are insufferable” vibe while Lainie gets a bit of an edge to her.

balletbookworm I kept imagining Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys as the main characters. 😻 3mo
balletbookworm Also, bro actors are the worst 3mo
writerlibrarian I love this book... love Lucy ... my Richard is Richard Armitage.. really... https://images.app.goo.gl/5A6mMa6NupMCn5Bb6 3mo
balletbookworm @writerlibrarian see, Mr Armitage is Griff from book 4 for me with a blonde wig (or he can just wear his own hair). I went to Matthew bc he was Darcy in Death Comes to Pemberley and was such a good snobby, moneyed git for about 2/3 until he got his head out of his backside 3mo
22 likes4 comments
review
balletbookworm
Knitting the Fog | Claudia D. Hernndez
post image
Pickpick

A moving memoir told through essays and poems about the author‘s childhood in Guatemala and migrating to the US at the age of 10. It‘s a very slice-of-life book, full of the details that a child remembers about playing with neighbors, the oddities of the neighborhood, and being raised by strong women.

review
balletbookworm
post image
Pickpick

An exquisitely beautiful extended letter from a son to a mother who may not ever be able to read it. It‘s damn near plotless but reveals very slowly, like attempting to peel off a Band-Aid, so many traumas and scars left by war, racism, homophobia, poverty, mental illness, and addiction.

If you liked Alexander Chee‘s writing, you will love Vuong‘s writing.

review
balletbookworm
Mehso-so

Shell has a lot of history to get through regarding how we got to our current state of discount retail. Suffice to say, everything is poorly made by an underpaid and abused worker in a developing country and that in turn drives down wages and labor advances in the United States. It's a whole vicious cycle and there doesn't seem to be much of a way out. I'd like to see an updated edition of this book now that we've gone through the 2008 recession.

balletbookworm A book I probably would have had trouble with in paper but since it was on audio and listened to in 30 minute chunks or so it breezed by. 4mo
balletbookworm Shell also really only focuses on discount retail, outlets, and the food industry - she doesn't even touch the big green A and other internet retailers. But a book worth reading to remind us of what we're buying when we think we're getting a deal - there's a difference between "cheap" and "thrifty." 4mo
11 likes2 comments