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With the End in Mind
With the End in Mind: Dying, Death, and Wisdom in an Age of Denial | Kathryn Mannix
10 posts | 7 read | 23 to read
For readers of Atul Gawande and Paul Kalanithi, a palliative care doctor's breathtaking stories from 30 years spent caring for the dying. Modern medical technology is allowing us to live longer and fuller lives than ever before. And for the most part, that is good news. But with changes in the way we understand medicine come changes in the way we understand death. Once a familiar and gentle process, death has come to be something from which we shy away, preferring to fight it desperately than to accept its inevitability. Palliative care has a long tradition in Britain, where Dr. Kathryn Mannix has practiced it for 30 years. In this book, she shares beautifully crafted stories from a lifetime of caring for the dying. With insightful meditations on life, death, and the space between them, With the End in Mind describes the possibility of meeting death gently, with forethought and preparation, and shows the unexpected beauty, dignity, and profound humanity of life coming to an end.
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rabbitprincess
Pickpick

Still just as good on a re-read. The part I always recommend is when Dr. Mannix talks about the actual physical processes involved in dying. Knowing this makes it easier to cope with the situation.

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squirrelbrain
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Pickpick

This book…..! 😢

It was so good though, as well, if that‘s not an odd thing to say with regard to a book about death. I loved Dear Life, which is a similar book also written by a palliative care doctor, and the lovely @JennyM not only recommended this book, but sent me a copy.

I‘m so glad you did Jenny; it‘s even better than Dear Life! Yes, you will cry all of the time whilst reading, but it‘s a must-read, as the blurb from The Times says.

JennyM I‘m so glad you loved the book. Lots of tears but lots of love and hope. I‘ll email you 😘 14mo
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squirrelbrain
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Here are my #bookspin and #doublespin books for June.

The tagged book (from the lovely @JennyM 😘) is one I‘m really looking forward to, if that‘s not a weird thing to say due to the subject matter! 🤔

And of course Sovietistan will tick off another ‘Stan‘ for #readingasia2021.

Loving the 3-in-a-row free spaces too, Sarah, along with the #doublespin in the same column! I always seem to read the free spaces before the rest of the board! 😁

JennyM I would definitely read with a cup of tea and box of tissues to hand. Hope you ‘enjoy‘, Helen😘 1y
TheAromaofBooks Woohoo!! And yes, the BookSpin Fates were generous this month!!! 1y
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JennyM
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‘Life is precious, and is perhaps best appreciated when we live with the end in mind‘.

A truely remarkable book about the process of dying written by a palliative care doctor brimming with compassion and wisdom. The stories are heartbreaking and I sobbed many times. But it also left me with a renewed feeling of purpose and gratitude for the things I have.

squirrelbrain I think I might need to read this one.... 2y
Reggie Oof. After Julie in Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, I don‘t know, but stacked anyways. 2y
JennyM @squirrelbrain @reggie it is definitely hard to read in parts. But it‘s not morbid. I‘m so glad to have read it. She‘s a pretty special doctor xx I think with your job, Helen you will get much from it xx (edited) 2y
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arlenefinnigan
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Pickpick

This is a brilliant and important, but very difficult, read. Dr Mannix's compassion and expertise stand out throughout the book, and she's an excellent story teller, but the stories are heartbreaking. The subject matter means it's very tough going, but that's kind of the point, these are things we should be thinking and talking about but don't. I'd definitely recommend this book to everyone, but be prepared for an emotional challenge.

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arlenefinnigan
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Library reserve just came in.

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jenniferheidi
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Pickpick

Book 3 of my #12booksofsummer challenge was my last remaining unread book from the 2018 Cheltenham Literature Festival and I definitely saved the best till last. This book - part memoir of a consultant in palliative care, part call to action to talk openly about death and dying and part guide to a good death - should be read by everyone. I was moved, inspired and even reassured by its honesty and compassion.

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rabbitprincess
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January 2019 wrap-up: 18 books read.
Best of the month: With the End in Mind, by Kathryn Mannix
Honourable mention: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, by Gail Honeyman

StillLookingForCarmenSanDiego Great reads! 📚💕 4y
rabbitprincess @StillLookingForCarmenSanDiego I was surprised by all the Doctor Who 😂 4y
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rabbitprincess
Pickpick

Mannix is a palliative care physician and cognitive behavioural therapist, and this combination of skills has been honed over a 30-year career. The stories of patients and their families navigating death are told with sensitivity and compassion, and each section contains pauses for thought to help you process what you've read. This is a must-read.

Crazeedi I will be reading this, thank you 4y
rabbitprincess @Crazeedi "Enjoy!" doesn't feel like quite the right sentiment, but I do hope you like it ♥️ 4y
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