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Founding Brothers
Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation | Joseph J. Ellis
In this landmark work of history, the National Book Awardwinning author of American Sphinx explores how a group of greatly gifted but deeply flawed individualsHamilton, Burr, Jefferson, Franklin, Washington, Adams, and Madisonconfronted the overwhelming challenges before them to set the course for our nation. The United States was more a fragile hope than a reality in 1790. During the decade that followed, the Founding Fathersre-examined here as Founding Brotherscombined the ideals of the Declaration of Independence with the content of the Constitution to create the practical workings of our government. Through an analysis of six fascinating episodesHamilton and Burrs deadly duel, Washingtons precedent-setting Farewell Address, Adams administration and political partnership with his wife, the debate about where to place the capital, Franklins attempt to force Congress to confront the issue of slavery and Madisons attempts to block him, and Jefferson and Adams famous correspondenceFounding Brothers brings to life the vital issues and personalities from the most important decade in our nations history. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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TheJuj
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All well and good, but for our purposes these otherwise-valuable insights are mere subplots almost designed to carry us down side trails while blithely humming a tune about the rough equivalence of forests and trees.

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crhealey
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Mehso-so

Interesting but insanely overwritten. #sloggedmywaythrough #iteachhistory

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crhealey
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#alwaysbereading #iteachmiddle When your students are having swimming lessons....

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crhealey
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A little Monday morning reading at the podium. #supervisingDEAR #modelinggoodbehavior

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JLaurenceCohen

If you want to read just one book about the founding of our nation, this would be a great choice. Ellis shows how men like Washington, Adams, Hamilton, Jefferson, Madison, and Burr shaped the American Revolution and the Constitution.

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CSeydel
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Thanks for the tag @Moray_Reads
1. Bailed on Anna Karenina, but still intend to read it in future.
1b. Did not get past ch. 1 of Breaking Dawn and never looked back.
1c. Didn‘t finish King Lear when it was assigned in school, but watched the movie and I think I‘m good.
2. M&Ms, because they‘re tidy. No crumbs or sticky pages.
3. Tagged, not exactly a biography, but an extremely good account of the personalities who created America‘s gov‘t.

mabell I really enjoyed Founding Brothers! You get a great overview in a relatively short book. I don't remember many details, but the John Adams and sedition section 😳 Things got nasty then too! 2y
CSeydel @mabell absolutely! 2y
Susanbones I tried reading Twilight but a few pages in, I bailed. 😂😂😂😂 Also, I absolutely love M&M‘s!!! 2y
CSeydel @Susanbones somehow I got through three of the series 😳 Honestly, Eclipse (#3) was probably my favorite. There was enough plot that the hackiness of the writing didn‘t detract. But then I just couldn‘t make myself get going on Breaking Dawn. 2y
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iread2much
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Pickpick

This book is super slow in the beginning, but picks up speed and ends with the fabulous story of John Adams and his relationship with Abigail and Jefferson. I didn‘t appreciate that the author only used endnotes, but it gives me an idea of what I want to read next. 3.5/5 stars. Read if you like learning about what came after the American revolution

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ALNickRose
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Pickpick

# 18: An enjoyable series of vignettes that illustrates the dynamics between the founding fathers as contemporaries. Written in the format of a story, it's a page turner!
#17booksin2017

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jkSep10
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Pickpick

A really good read. It doesn't bog you down with gory details like some history books can do. I plan on reading more books by Mr. Ellis!

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BookishMarginalia
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I ❤️ books! 🙌🏼🙌🏼🙌🏼

christineandbooks I'd love to know what you think of This Is How It Always Is when you're done with it... 3y
Belles Me too! 3y
Reviewsbylola Another one curious about This is How it Always is. 🙋🏻 3y
Bibliogeekery I'm dying to see a picture of your home library!! It must be amazing 😍!! 3y
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Nittnut
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"If God was in the details, so the saying went, Madison was usually there to greet him upon arrival."

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DMC_run8
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Sunday night mood

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jdtchicago

Upon learning that Washington intended to reject the mantle of emperor, no less an authority than George III allegedly observed, “If he does that, he will be the greatest man in the world.” True to his word, on December 22, 1783, Washington surrendered his commission... “Having now finished the work assigned me, I now retire from the great theater of action.” In so doing, he became the supreme example of the leader who could be trusted with power

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Libby1
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#booktober
#awardwinning

Founding Brothers instilled in me a love for John Adams. There's also a chapter about the Hamilton-Burr duel for all you Hamiltonians. #hamilton

This is history at its readable best.

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Susanita
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My favorite "read" in August was the first several episodes of the Washington Post's Presidential podcast, which was recommended to me by a history nerd coworker. This may also explain why I m behind with my reading goals. But the podcasts are really interesting! #septphotochallenge

JoeStalksBeck I adore Jefferson! Even have a sticker of him on my car! Check out The Thomas Jefferson hour podcast with Clay Jenkinson. I promise you won't be disappointed 😉 3y
Susanita Thanks for the recommendation! 3y
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smallstepsgiantleaps
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"Lincoln once said that America was founded on a proposition that was written by Jefferson in 1776. We are really founded on an argument about what that proposition means."