Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
This Land Is Their Land
This Land Is Their Land: The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the Troubled History of Thanksgiving | David J. Silverman
3 posts | 1 read | 15 to read
Ahead of the 400th anniversary of the first Thanksgiving, a new look at the Plymouth colony's founding events, told for the first time with Wampanoag people at the heart of the story. In March 1621, when Plymouth's survival was hanging in the balance, the Wampanoag sachem (or chief), Ousamequin (Massasoit), and Plymouth's governor, John Carver, declared their people's friendship for each other and a commitment to mutual defense. Later that autumn, the English gathered their first successful harvest and lifted the specter of starvation. Ousmaequin and 90 of his men then visited Plymouth for the First Thanksgiving. The treaty remained operative until King Philip's War in 1675, when 50 years of uneasy peace between the two parties would come to an end. 400 years after that famous meal, historian David J. Silverman sheds profound new light on the events that led to the creation, and bloody dissolution, of this alliance. Focusing on the Wampanoag Indians, Silverman deepens the narrative to consider tensions that developed well before 1620 and lasted long after the devastating war-tracing the Wampanoags' ongoing struggle for self-determination up to this very day. This unsettling history reveals why some modern Native people hold a Day of Mourning on Thanksgiving, a holiday which celebrates a myth of colonialism and white proprietorship of the United States. This Land is Their Land shows that it is time to rethink how we, as a pluralistic nation, tell the history of Thanksgiving.
Amazon Indiebound Barnes and Noble WorldCat Goodreads LibraryThing
Pick icon
100%
review
Librarybelle
post image
Pickpick

If you‘re a fan of the US pilgrim pageantry at Thanksgiving, and/or a narrative nonfiction lover, this book is not for you. This is a very academic, yet extremely necessary, view of the history Wampanoag Indians, from pre-colonialism up to present day. It‘s heartbreaking and maddening. It‘s over 400 pages of text, with nearly 100 pages of end notes. I‘m so glad I read it. I learned so much, way more than any other text I‘ve read. 🌟🌟🌟🌟

79 likes6 stack adds
quote
Librarybelle
post image

“Sometimes silences in the historical record can speak as loudly as words.”

I was just thinking this morning about the way we interpret history - historical record passed down is mostly from the victors or those who have the best ability to record an event (those who have a written language and can record an event with the pen).

In the case of the Wampanoag, the English man got to tell the story. #NFNov

Moonprismpower I think with the 400 coming up many celebrations are focused on indigenous people. And it‘s about time and I‘m thankful for this turn. Let hope it continues. 2mo
Clwojick 1pt 2mo
72 likes3 comments
blurb
Librarybelle
post image

#TIL : A whole lot more about the Native American tribes living in southern New England prior to the European colonization of the US‘ Northeast. It was interesting how experts have pieced together roughly when these groups started growing maize and beans (about a thousand years ago).

This is a good read for the Thanksgiving week - a closer to the truth story of the first “Thanksgiving” in the US. #NFNov

Clwojick 4pt 2mo
100 likes6 stack adds1 comment