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Gender and Our Brains
Gender and Our Brains: How New Neuroscience Explodes the Myths of the Male and Female Minds | Gina Rippon
10 posts | 5 read | 1 reading | 12 to read
Originally published in Great Britain by The Bodley Head, an imprint of Vintage, part of the Penguin Random House group of companies, London in 2019.
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speljamr
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Pickpick

What a fantastic exploration of so much research that has been done trying to prove the infamous male and female brain. As expected, it's still a bunch of wishful patriarchal thinking when it all comes down to it. It's a slow read with a lot of details, but I highly recommend it.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

#science #gender #feminism

70 likes9 stack adds
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rabbitprincess
Bailedbailed

Lost interest early on and never really got it back.

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rabbitprincess
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In the UK, the Daily Mail focused on different matters of moment, reporting that ‘Men and women respond to eating chocolate with different parts of their brains‘, the syntax checker having been off that day, apparently.

Feeling ambivalent about this book, but I like this footnote 😂

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Clare-Dragonfly
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Mehso-so

This books purports to destroy the myth of gendered brains. Mostly, it goes through the history of neuroscience and psychology of gender, showing that even studies that claim to show big differences between the sexes show that we are more alike than different. I learned interesting things and the book was funny at times, but I was disappointed that it gave a couple of pages of lip service to trans people, and never mentioned genderqueer people.

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Clare-Dragonfly

“The arrival of Daughter #1 was my own firsthand experience of the newborn brain at work… It was rapidly clear that I had produced a tiny but extremely loud transmitting device, programmed to continuously signal some kind of deficit associated with her digestive system and/or the state of her nether regions, or just to offer a spontaneous demonstration of her sound-generating capacity. Her timer was set for maximum activity during… 👇🏻

Clare-Dragonfly “the hours of darkness and rebooted every thirty-five minutes or so; random checks would be carried out to ensure a constant state of readiness on the part of her workforce. She didn‘t appear to be much of a receiving device apart from some highly effective monitoring of sounds such as receding tiptoes or tentatively closing doors, the perception of which would immediately trigger her alarm system…” 👶🏻 2y
17 likes1 comment
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JSW
Pickpick

This book thoroughly (and I mean, extensively) summarizes a ton of neuroscience, brain research, and historical brain ideas and studies. Which is interesting, but also muddies the overall message. The book could‘ve been much shorter and referred people to more reading via footnotes, and gotten more to the point. The text is mostly accessible to non-scientists and explained well. Overall a good read.

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Clare-Dragonfly
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Well, that‘s disappointing. I was looking forward to this book blasting apart the binary but I guess that impression was wrong. It‘s 2019! You can use “they”! 😡

shanaqui I had the same reaction when I read that bit! She very much treats gender as male-or-female, overall -- she doesn't think there's much difference between them, but I don't think she ever acknowledges people identifying outside the binary. 2y
rabbitprincess I had the same thought! 2y
20 likes2 comments
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Clare-Dragonfly
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“If, for example, being male means that you have much greater experience of constructing things or manipulating complex 3-D representations (such as playing with LEGO), it is very likely that this will be shown in your brain. Brains reflect the lives they have lived, not just the sex of their owners.”

I basically want to quote this whole introduction so far. NEUROPLASTICITY. IT‘S A THING.

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JSW
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My weekend is all booked! What are you reading this weekend?

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JSW
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Up next! A library find that I hope is not too academic - though I appreciate it‘s coming from a neuroscience perspective!

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