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The Color of Compromise
The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Churchs Complicity in Racism | Jemar Tisby
13 posts | 13 read | 17 to read
The Color of Compromise takes readers on a historical journey: from Americas early colonial days through slavery and the Civil War, covering the tragedy of Jim Crow laws and the victories of the Civil Rights era, to todays Black Lives Matter movement. Author Jemar Tisby reveals the obviousand the far more subtleways the American church has compromised what the Bible teaches about human dignity and equality. Tisby uncovers the roots of sustained injustice in the American church, highlighting the cultural and institutional tables that need to be turned in order to bring about real and lasting progress between black and white people. Through a story-driven survey of American Christianitys racial past, he exposes the concrete and chilling ways people of faith have actively worked against racial justice, as well as the deafening silence of the white evangelical majority. Tisby shows that while there has been progress in fighting racism, historically the majority of the American church has failed to speak out against this evil. This ongoing complicity is a stain upon the church, and sadly, it continues today. Tisby does more than diagnose the problem, however. He charts a path forward with intriguing ideas that further the conversation as he challenges us to reverse these patterns and systems of complicity with bold, courageous, and immediate action. The Color of Compromise provides an accurate diagnosis for a racially divided American church and suggests creative ways to foster a more equitable and inclusive environment among Gods people.
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CRR
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Pickpick

Such a powerful book. Chapters were a survey of American history with emphasis on racism and the role of the church. There was a lot of history I have never been taught before. This book has impacted my life and thinking very much and I am grateful.

28 likes2 stack adds
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KS1805
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Pickpick

This is an important book on my journey to deconstruct my faith.

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Megabooks
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Pickpick

I go to a fairly social justice-driven church, especially for the area where I live. And I think that drives me to dig deeper into uncomfortable aspects of my faith, so I was really happy to get this recommendation from @howjessicareads on Instagram.

This book looks at the history of the complicity of the American Protestant church in slavery and racism. Highly recommend!

Cinfhen I‘m not sure I‘m the right audience for this one, what do u think? 10mo
Megabooks @Cinfhen it‘s written more for Christians, so probably not. 💜 10mo
howjessicareads So good! Glad you liked it!! 10mo
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Centique I like the sound of a social justice driven church! I haven‘t been to church for a long time, my old church was consistently disappointing on these issues. And recent troubles - they‘ve been inept. 🙄 10mo
Megabooks @Centique yes, my church was the only one in our town of many, many churches to run a Covid vaccination clinic. 👍🏻 10mo
Centique @Megabooks that‘s so good to hear! 💕 10mo
82 likes2 stack adds6 comments
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Tomigirl44
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Pickpick

Painfully honest history, heartbreaking but important.

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hwestfall
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I borrowed this book from the library. I thought it was a good overall history of the church and it‘s complicity in racism. I am planning on purchasing this book for my library. I want to reference it in the future and be able to loan it out to friends.

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EvaPriest
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This book is heart-rending. Christians ignorant of the ways the Church has enabled and propagated racism MUST read this book. It is imperative for the sake of those who have been oppressed while their white brothers and sisters remained unmoved or unaware. This ought not be. This book is a good step in understanding the injustice perpetrated against African Americans while the white Church was largely silent. To heal, we must first understand.

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hes7
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A valuable exploration of the American Church‘s history with racism that also touches on what that means for Christians today. #readblackauthors

86 likes4 stack adds
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Davidtk20
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This book surveys the church‘s complicity in racism and how it plays a part in keeping the problem alive. In light of what happened in Minneapolis and what keeps happening in America, this book sheds light on the systemic inequalities among the races and classes and provides solutions to fix the problems. If you want to be a part of the solution instead of the problem, especially for Christians, this book will guide you

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jjkohman
Pickpick

Super book. Awful history. Sad to see the church's ugly complicity in slavery and racism.

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ElectricKatyLand
Pickpick

Well-researched and clearly written examination of Christians' (and Christianity's) support for racist people, policies, and perspectives in the US. Would make an equally good introduction to the topic as an advanced-level text. Includes prescriptions for change - if we made it racist, we can un-make it. I noticed a couple of citation/typo errors, but overall, a great read.

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jamicuns
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Such an important book

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jamicuns
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This is a really important book. I think it would make a great companion book to The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander. He is thorough in his assessments and in his historical summaries. This book is not hyperbole, it is factual. I highly recommend it, unless you haven‘t read much re race in our country and then I would recommend a few books before this one, starting with The New Jim Crow.

jamicuns If you haven‘t read much regarding race in America by POC authors this book will come as a shock and you may think the author is overblowing the situation...“playing the race card” or “making us divisive by bringing race up”. I may have actually uttered those words myself a few years ago, unfortunately. I have spend the last few years reading and educating myself on race in America and have been repenting of my thinking ever since. 3y
7 likes1 comment