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Rubicon
Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic | Tom Holland
The Roman Republic was the most remarkable state in history. What began as a small community of peasants camped among marshes and hills ended up ruling the known world. Rubicon paints a vivid portrait of the Republic at the climax of its greatness - the same greatness which would herald the catastrophe of its fall. It is a story of incomparable drama. This was the century of Julius Caesar, the gambler whose addiction to glory led him to the banks of the Rubicon, and beyond; of Cicero, whose defence of freedom would make him a byword for eloquence; of Spartacus, the slave who dared to challenge a superpower; of Cleopatra, the queen who did the same. Tom Holland brings to life this strange and unsettling civilization, with its extremes of ambition and self-sacrifice, bloodshed and desire. Yet alien as it was, the Republic still holds up a mirror to us. Its citizens were obsessed by celebrity chefs, all-night dancing and exotic pets; they fought elections in law courts and were addicted to spin; they toppled foreign tyrants in the name of self-defence. Two thousand years may have passed, but we remain the Romans' heirs.
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LitLogophile

There was no state-run prosecution service. Instead, all cases had to be brought privately, making it a simple matter for feuds to find a vent in the courts. The prosecution of a rival might well prove a knockout blow. Officially the penalty for a defendant found guilty of a serious crime was death. In practice, because the Republic had no police force or prison system, a condemned man would be permitted to slip away into exile...

LitLogophile ...and even live in luxury, if he had succeeded in squirreling away his portable wealth in time. (edited) 10mo
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LitLogophile
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I love to read multiple books at one, usually fiction at home and a nice nonfiction to carry around at work.

Now that I finished with my Romanov book, it‘s back to Rome between court appearances. Back in time but people are still getting murdered for no damn reason.

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LitLogophile
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Reading my new book between court appearances, my world map book sleeve goes well with this one😊

TheKidUpstairs Love your ring! 14mo
LitLogophile Oh thanks !!😊😊 @TheKidUpstairs 14mo
75 likes2 comments
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LectricSheep
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“Human nature is universally imbued with a desire for liberty, and a hatred for servitude.” — Caesar, Gallic Wars
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I‘m savoring my way through Tom Holland‘s Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic. It‘ll probably be a few more days before I can give a final review since I‘m taking notes and summarizing as I go, which makes the reading process take about 3 times longer than usual. But for really good non-fiction, I think it‘s worth it.

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Col
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review
SouthBeachStrangler
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Pickpick

Tom Holland is a consummate writer. He balances storytelling and history context in an evenhanded manner, illuminating the late stages of the Roman Republic with ease.