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Bartholomew and the Oobleck
Bartholomew and the Oobleck | Seuss
5 posts | 10 read
In this Caldecott Honorwinning picture book, join Bartholomew Cubbins in Dr. Seusss classic tale of one kings magical mishap. Bored with rain, sun, fog, and snow, King Derwin of Didd summons his royal magicians to create something new and exciting to fall from the sky. What he gets is a storm of sticky green globs called Oobleck, which soon causes a royal mess. But with the assistance of the wise page boy Bartholomew, the king (along with young readers) learns that the simplest words can sometimes solve the biggest problems. From the Hardcover edition.
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review
katiehamlin
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Pickpick

Bartholomew and the Oobleck is a F picture book written and illustrated by Dr. Seuss. This would be good when used as a RA in a classroom grades K-2. It won the Caldecott Medal in 1950. This story is about a boy named Bartholomew Cubbins who is responsible for rescuing his kingdom, the Kingdom of Kidd, from the sticky green oobleck that has taken it over. #UCFLAE3414F19

katiehamlin The EL strategy I would use with this book, which is very important when reading any Dr. Seuss book, is 14, simplify your speech by making it slower and redundant. Dr. Seuss is challenging even for students who speak English as their first language, so for students who speak it second it is critical they are seated up front to read the teachers mouth, and for the teacher to speak slowly and clearly so the student understands everything said. 3mo
katiehamlin The UDL principle I would use is 7.3, minimize threats and distractions. By using this as a RA, you can seat the students close to you on the rug so they are more engaged in the book and paying attention to everything you are saying.
3mo
katiehamlin The resource I would use with this book is https://littlebinsforlittlehands.com/oobleck-recipe/ . This website has a recipe to make the oobleck that is in the book! It‘s such a fun way to incorporate a science activity into the lesson with this book, and students love to have the opportunity to make things like oobleck or slime!
3mo
See All 8 Comments
JRone Your EL strategy is perfect. Dr. Suess books can be challenging to follow along for and EL so I think you picked the perfect strategy.
3mo
alexblanco Dr. Suess books are so enjoyable to read to kids. They absolutely love them! I love the resource you used!:) 3mo
ccipriati This sounds so fun. I love Dr. Seuss books 3mo
CPettersen I love this book! When I was in 4th grade we read this book and the teacher used it in a lesson tying together science and reading. Very good choice! 3mo
DrSpalding I know so many teachers that have made this recipe after reading this book. Incorporating quality children‘s literature and science is best practice. Fun and educational post. 1mo
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blurb
destaneefolden

This story was much longer than I remembered! However, I think that if you can keep the children's attention then this would be a great story to integrate with lessons that involve slime or maybe even the weather. I love this story but I just think there could be potential issues with keep children attentive.

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destaneefolden

“I mean,“ said Bartholomew, “this is all your fault! Now, the least you can do is say the simple words, 'I'm sorry.'“

review
destaneefolden
Pickpick

This Caldecott winner is a fun story where the king wants to change up the weather and things get pretty crazy! This slime-like substance causes issues for people all throughout the town. I think that this story is a little too long for younger children but with interactive questions or activities, this could be a fun story to integrate into lessons.

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MissKatie
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Thanks for this, Timehop. When seminary meets Seuss. . . 🤗🙈

#storyofmylife

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