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The Ends of the World
The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth's Past Mass Extinctions | Peter Brannen
As new groundbreaking research suggests that climate change played a major role in the most extreme catastrophes in the planet's history, award-winning science journalist Peter Brannen takes us on a wild ride through the planet's five mass extinctions and, in the process, offers us a glimpse of our increasingly dangerous future Our world has ended five times: it has been broiled, frozen, poison-gassed, smothered, and pelted by asteroids. In The Ends of the World, Peter Brannen dives into deep time, exploring Earths past dead ends, and in the process, offers us a glimpse of our possible future. Many scientists now believe that the climate shifts of the twenty-first century have analogs in these five extinctions. Using the visible clues these devastations have left behind in the fossil record, The Ends of the World takes us inside scenes of the crime, from South Africa to the New York Palisades, to tell the story of each extinction. Brannen examines the fossil recordwhich is rife with creatures like dragonflies the size of sea gulls and guillotine-mouthed fishand introduces us to the researchers on the front lines who, using the forensic tools of modern science, are piecing together what really happened at the crime scenes of the Earths biggest whodunits. Part road trip, part history, and part cautionary tale, The Ends of the World takes us on a tour of the ways that our planet has clawed itself back from the grave, and casts our future in a completely new light.
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tricours
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Pickpick

Good book, wrong format. There‘s too much info in this for audio, it would have been best suited as a book with lots of pictures, or even better: a tv series! There‘s only so many names of time periods and extinct creatures a person can remember.

Texreader Looks interesting 6mo
26 likes1 comment
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AthenaWins
Pickpick

The Ends of the World was a wild ride through hundreds of millions of years of strange creatures both great and small, and 5 major mass extinctions that all but ended life on Earth. While on the journey Brannen points out undeniable similarities between then and present day. I have to say I experienced a lot of anxiety while reading this. Particularly the last two chapters. But it isn't and shouldn't be all doom and gloom. There is still hope.

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AthenaWins
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"With his paean to 'the Pale Blue Dot,' Carl Sagan helped to illustrate how utterly marooned we are in our tiny, far-flung corner of space. But we are similarly marooned in time, between incomprehensible eternities."

For some reason I find this terrifying.

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AthenaWins

The epitaph for humanity does not yet have to include the tragic indictment of having engineered the sixth major mass extinction in earth history.

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AthenaWins
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I have a certain morbid fascination with things that have ended and will end eventually. So I couldn't just leave this book on the shelf. I hope it's as good as the opening chapter.

overtheedge That's looks so good!! 1y
AthenaWins I know! So excited to dig in! 1y
10 likes2 stack adds2 comments
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Geeklet
Pickpick

A super informative look at the big five extinction events in the history of Earth. Most of us know about the one that ended the dinosaurs but it was interesting to read the different theories about the others. The later chapters ask if we‘re currently in a sixth extinction event with a few different viewpoints. The book is pretty easy to read and the author does a good job describing the world as it was then. Pretty neat book for archeology fans!

wtimblin Sounds like you're now geared up for tackling The Sixth Extinction (although knowing you you have already read this!) 1y
Geeklet @wtimblin I actually haven‘t yet but I‘ve been meaning to. I have a big heart and it really bothers me to think of the damage humans have done to the planet. I really am going to read it soon. It‘s been on my to-buy list for ages. 1y
wtimblin Tell me about it. It's a hard read no doubt. But I remember finishing it feeling strangely positive. Can't remember why exactly, but it was not all doom and gloom! 1y
17 likes3 comments
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Geeklet
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Never fear kids, science has an opinion on the important T. Rex vs Polar Bear fight.

Always go with the dinosaur.

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Aylandra
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Just got this book ordered via Waterstones. A friend picked it up for me as I was working an awkward shift, but looking forward to tucking into it after work today :)

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BrittFrancko
Mehso-so

The science in here was great, and I‘d love to be able to recommend it without reservation. Unfortunately, the author was an insufferable dudebro who inserted weird ableist and judgy asides about the various people he encountered while researching the book.

AllisonMP THAT. Plus the editor gave up about halfway through. Unusually high number of sentences that just don‘t parse. 1y
2 likes1 comment
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BrittFrancko

“While the Texas oil economy relies on the truth of geology, many of its inhabitants remain stubbornly resistant to its charms.”

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KeeWee
Pickpick

Very meaty book that will expand your views of our tiny planet. Rich history of life and mind blowing details of our earth‘s past.

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Librarianaut
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This looks interesting.

35 likes3 stack adds