Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
Separate Is Never Equal
Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation | Duncan Tonatiuh
92 posts | 57 read | 12 to read
A 2015 Pura Belpr Illustrator Honor Book and a 2015 Robert F. Sibert Honor Book Almost 10 years before Brown vs. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California. An American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage who spoke and wrote perfect English, Mendez was denied enrollment to a Whites only school. Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California. Praise for Separate is Never Equal STARRED REVIEWS "Tonatiuh masterfully combines text and folk-inspired art to add an important piece to the mosaic of U.S. civil rights history." --Kirkus Reviews, starred review Younger children will be outraged by the injustice of the Mendez family story but pleased by its successful resolution. Older children will understand the importance of the 1947 ruling that desegregated California schools, paving the way for Brown v. Board of Education seven years later. --School Library Journal, starred review "Tonatiuh (Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote) offers an illuminating account of a familys hard-fought legal battle to desegregate California schools in the years before Brown v. Board of Education." --Publishers Weekly "Pura Belpr Awardwinning Tonatiuh makes excellent use of picture-book storytelling to bring attention to the 1947 California ruling against public-school segregation." --Booklist "The straightforward narrative is well matched with the illustrations in Tonatiuhs signature style, their two-dimensional perspective reminiscent of the Mixtec codex but collaged with paper, wood, cloth, brick, and (Photoshopped) hair to provide textural variation. This story deserves to be more widely known, and now, thanks to this book, it will be." --The Horn Book Magazine
Amazon Indiebound Barnes and Noble WorldCat Goodreads LibraryThing
Pick icon
100%
review
Cjloftus
Pickpick

Separate is Never Equal is a book that takes place 10 years before Brown vs. Board of Education. A girl who is an American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican decent takes on segregated education in California. Sylvia was denied access to a whites only school so her family decides to stand up for what‘s right.

blurb
Hcecrle

This nonfiction story is very touching as a young girl who is excited about attending a local school. Come to find out she and her siblings end up being turned away. They are told to enroll in a Mexican school instead, even though she is an American citizen who speaks fluent English. The girl's family is so upset by the school's response that they decide to file a lawsuit. Ultimately helping end school segregation laws in California in the 40s.

Hcecrle Carter G. Woodson award winner, published in 2014. 2mo
1 comment
review
Jordan1201
Pickpick

Separate Is Never Equal written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh was published on May 6th, 2014. This story is a biography and won the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award. Separate Is Never Equal tells the story of how Mexican-born Gonzalo Mendez and Puerto Rican Felicitas Mendez challenged the separate and unequal school system in California.

review
laurenebailey14
Pickpick

When moving to California, Sylvia Mendez was excited about enrolling into her new school. Instead, her and her brothers were told to enroll into an all Mexican school. This confused Sylvia because she was an American citizen who spoke clear English. This story tells us about how the Mendez family brought efforts forward to bring an end to segregation, eventually leading to Brown v. Board of Education.

laurenebailey14 -2015 Pura Belpre
-2015 Tomas Rivera
- Robert F. Sibert book award
3mo
1 comment
review
clairebourq_2023
Pickpick

Sylvia Mendez is a young girl who moved to California with her family. When her and her brothers tried to enroll into the neighborhood school, they were denied entry. They were told they needed to go to an all Mexican school instead. This was confusing for her and her family. Her family took control of the situation and organized a law suit. The Mendez family helped bring segregation to an end in the California school systems.

clairebourq_2023 This book is a great nonfictional book to read to your children in a class. I would totally recommend this story ?
Publication date: May 6, 2014
Awards: Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award
Genre: Nonfiction Children's Literature
3mo
clairebourq_2023 Lit Index: Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award 3mo
2 comments
blurb
maggiedesantis

This book describes the story of how seven years before Brown v. Board of Education, the Mendez family fought to end segregation in California schools.
Awards won: Carter G. Woodson Book Award
Purpose of Award: Encourage the writing, publishing, and dissemination of outstanding social science books for young readers that treat topics related to ethnic minorities and relations sensitively and accurately
Author: Duncan Tonatiuh

maggiedesantis Date of publication: 2014
Genre: Biography
4mo
1 stack add1 comment
review
ehrmans
Mehso-so

This book tells the story of how Gonzalo Mendes and Felicitas Mendez challenged the separate but unequal school system in Califonia. Gonzalo was Mexican-born and Felicitas was Puerto Rican. The story takes place during World War II. The book highlights Mendez v. Westminster desegregation case in Califonia that came before Brown v. Board. The book highlights how Mendez organized leading up to the case and during it as well.

ehrmans Author and illustrator: Duncan Tonatiuh. Genre: biography. Publication date: 2014. Award: Tomas Rivera Award.
5mo
1 comment
review
elijahwilliams
Pickpick

Author & Illustrator: Duncan Tonatiuh
Award: Pura Belpre Award (2015)
Genre: Biography/ Nonfiction/ Picture book
Publication: 2014

elijahwilliams This is a biography of Sylvia Mendez's Mexican American Familys legal battle against the school district after their move in 1944. Sylvie and her siblings weren't allowed to go to the nearest public school so her father sued the district, this book explores the courts ruling, the facts of the case, and narrates the emotional experiences that Sylvie experienced at such a young age. 5mo
1 comment
quote
Lilyj9
post image

“Sylvia looked at her cousins. They had light skin and long auburn hair, and their last name was Vidaurri- their father was Mexican, but of French descent.”
This quote made me sad, thinking about a little girl comparing her skin and wondering if she cannot gi to this school because her skin is darker and her name is of a Mexican descent. This is clarity that they really just judged off their skin color, considering those are her cousins!

blurb
Lilyj9
post image

This book is phenomenal, and it would be a good read in the classroom. To show the history of Mexicans and what they had to do, to just come to school. This also shows how lucky we are that these families fought for the right for us to learn together. The value of inclusion is so important. Also at the beginning the daughter Sylvia was made fun of at her new school for being Mexican, but she has to remember, this is what they fought for.

review
Lilyj9
post image
Pickpick

Winner of a Pura Belpré award, Separate is Never Equal is a very enlightening book. Its about a Mexican family looking to enroll in the closest school to their house and not being aloud because they are Mexican. There father took it to court with a lawyer and eventually the whole state of California creating a law that children of any race,ethnicity and culture are allowed in any school.

quote
terracollichio
post image

What I loved so much about this book is the art that when with it. They are drawings but the textures are actual pictures. For example, the hair is outlined but a picture of real hair. They do this for most of the textures and I‘ve never seen it down before, it‘s so cool!

blurb
terracollichio

I liked this book a lot because it shows the importance of everyone. I think a lot of times in schools we want to focus on diversity and really hone into black history month and black heroes. While that is amazing, we also need some representation in other races as well and this book does that and includes some really awesome things they accomplished.

review
terracollichio
Pickpick

Separate is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh 2014. This book takes us through the journey of the historical fight for equal rights among Mexican children. The child and her family were upset that they could not attend the same school as the other kids and were referred to apply at the Mexican school. Sibert and Pura Belpré.

quote
victoriaberns

“This time she did not listen to any whispers. She ignored the children who pointed at her and called her names. Instead, she held her head high. Her parents fought not only for her and her brothers but for all their classmates.” p.34

blurb
victoriaberns

The author‘s note and real pictures of Sylvia and her family really connected with me as a reader. The story was powerful, but knowing that these things happened to real people and real families makes their fight for desegregation in schools so much more powerful. It‘s interesting to know more information about them and the trials.

review
victoriaberns
Mehso-so

Sibert Honor and Belpré Honor, published 2014. This book told the story about a young Mexican girl and her family who moved to a new town. They were turned away by the neighborhood school and told they had to attend the Mexican school. Their family fought to bring and end to segregation in schools. This book is very empowering and very educating on Brown v. Board. Great book for older grades.

2 stack adds
quote
JoyBlue
post image

“Cuando la causa es justa, los demas te siguen.“ “When you fight for justice, others will follow.“

review
JoyBlue
post image
Pickpick

Like most Americans, I knew about Brown v. Board of Education; but, I had never heard of the earlier case Mendez v. Westminster School District. This was an excellent children's picture book about the Mendez case, including a more comprehensive Author's Note at the end for adults.

46 likes1 stack add
review
JoslynB
post image
Pickpick

Separate Is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh is a NF book that has received the Jane Addams award. The story details the struggle of the Mendez family as they combat discrimination and fight against segregation so Latin families and others can have a right to a fair education. This book is great to begin an AS with Tonatiuh's other literary works.

JoslynB http://duncantonatiuh.com/videoresources/
UDL principle 3.2 highlight patterns, critical features, big ideas, and relationships and EL 16 integrate speaking, listening, reading and writing activities pair well for this book and its plethora of resources available on the author's website. #ucflae3414su20
3y
gpraytor I also almost picked this book! It is a must read. I like your video resource you paired with it! 3y
nquintus Joslyn, I think this is an excellent choice for a diverse classroom library. It is non-fiction that will expose students to a part of American History that is seldom taught at any grade level. This book also provides an excellent opportunity to integrate reading into Social Studies. Nice job! 3y
DrSpalding This author only has three titles on the resource provided but you could still use it as an author study and integrate it into social studies lessons. Excellent book selection. 3y
8 likes1 stack add4 comments
review
MaddyJ
post image
Pickpick

This NF book is a Pura Belpre honor book, and the Sibert award winner. It is a story about Sylvia, who‘s family immigrated from Mexico to the USA for a better life. When they go to enroll in school, they‘re told they must go to the “Mexican school”, and never given a reason why. Her father fights with all his might and in the end, he wins so students of all races can go to whatever school they want. This is a powerful message to be shared in a RA.

MaddyJ https://www.rif.org/literacy-central/book/separate-never-equal-sylvia-mendez-and... - This site has great extension activities related to the book for all ages! It would be a great book for RA while celebrating Hispanic History month. UDL 2.4 (Promote understanding across languages) and EL 24 (Incorporate the culture and the language of second language learners in your curriculum) are met using this book and activites. 3y
DrSpalding Your resource is of high quality! You do a beautiful job of elaborating on your extension activities and connecting them to the appropriate principles and strategies. This is a multi award winning book that shares an important story.This book should be used during social studies units 3y
6 likes3 comments
quote
ritakingston

“When you fight for justice, others will follow.”

blurb
ritakingston

I will use this book in a classroom read-aloud because it can inform children about how people had to fight for segregation and how we can learn from this book. It also will be a tool for me when talking about racism.

review
ritakingston
post image
Pickpick

I absolutely love this book and I think it is so important for children to learn about the history of our country. This is a good nonfiction book because generalizations are supported by facts and the facts are accurate.

quote
Clairedannemiller

“The mendez children have to go to the mexican school“

blurb
Clairedannemiller

This book would be great for older elementary students because the subject is more complicated to understand. Students may need to have a background of the story before reading the story to help them.

review
Clairedannemiller
Pickpick

This is a nonfiction children's book. The facts in this story can be accurate because of things that have happened in the past. The story is structured very clearly and gets the stories point across.

quote
cparsley
post image

“the Mendez children have to go to the mexican school” This part of the book was so sad to me and influenced the rest of the book

blurb
cparsley

This is a good example of nonfiction, it tells a story that children need to know and is good education for them

review
cparsley
Pickpick

This is a nonfiction book about children going to segregated schools and how that was changed

blurb
meganslats

I would definitely use this book inside my classroom. I would use it more in a second and up classroom only because the subject is a little bit for older children, and they might not understand what is going on. It is a great representation of racial discrimination back in the day and the author writes the book in a simple way for young children to understand.

quote
meganslats

“How many of the two-hundred ninety-two children at the Mexican school are inferior to whites in personal hygiene?“

review
meganslats
Pickpick

This is a nonfiction book about a Mexican family who fought for their rights. The dad fought for his kids to be able to go to the same school as white kids. The author's note includes pictures of the little girl and family from the story. A lot of the text comes from actual conversations that the author had with Sylvia Mendez. This is also an award-winning book.

quote
k.gauze
post image

“Segregation tens to give an aura of inferiority. In order to have people in the United Stares understand one another it is necessary for them to live together, and the public school is one of the mechanism where all the children of all the people go”

blurb
k.gauze

love this book! Would definitely read it to a class or my own children. It is meaningful and tells a very important story. One of the many examples of parents fighting for their child‘s education.