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The Embers and the Stars
The Embers and the Stars | Erazim Kohk
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"It is hard to put this profound book into a category. Despite the author's criticisms of Thoreau, it is more like Walden than any other book I have read. . . . The book makes great strides toward bringing the best insights from medieval philosophy and from contemporary environmental ethics together. Anyone interested in both of these areas must read this book."Daniel A. Dombrowski, The Thomist "Those who share Kohk's concern to understand nature as other than a mere resource or matter in motion will find his temporally oriented interpretation of nature instructive. It is here in particular that Kohk turns moments of experience to account philosophically, turning what we habitually overlook or avoid into an opportunity and basis for self-knowledge. This is an impassioned attempt to see the vital order of nature and the moral order of our humanity as one."Ethics
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#AyupAugust

(Day 21 - #UnderneathTheStars)

*Erazim Kohák is a Czech national whose family escaped to the US in 1948. While on sabbatical from Boston College, he built a cabin—without and beyond the borders of electricity—in the mountains of New Hampshire. He spent his time there writing one of the greatest philosophical considerations of nature and the environment and our moral obligations to it ever written. Comparisons to Thoreau are ⬇️

gradcat ⬆️ (cont.) numerous, facile and over-simplifications. Comparing “The Embers and the Stars” to Thoreau‘s “Walden” is highly reductive and does not do Kohák justice. ♥️ (edited) 3y
Cinfhen Cool 3y
gradcat @Cinfhen 😎😁♥️ 3y
squirrelbrain I‘d love to know more about his life in the cabin! 3y
gradcat It‘s a really interesting book, but I fear life in the cabin is used more as his ambience...there‘s some stories of his living there, but the book is chiefly about moral philosophy historically, and eco-morality currently. You could live like this—it is possible—but if not, the very least we can do is have an environmental ethics to live by. 3y
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