Home Feed
Home
Search
Search
Add Review, Blurb, Quote
Add
Activity
Activity
Profile
Profile
Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future
Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future | Kate Brown
3 posts | 2 read | 6 to read
A chilling expos of the international effort to minimize the health and environmental consequences of nuclear radiation in the wake of Chernobyl. Dear Comrades! Since the accident at the Chernobyl power plant, there has been a detailed analysis of the radioactivity of the food and territory of your population point. The results show that living and working in your village will cause no harm to adults or children. So began a pamphlet issued by the Ukrainian Ministry of Healthwhich, despite its optimistic beginnings, went on to warn its readers against consuming local milk, berries, or mushrooms, or going into the surrounding forest. This was only one of many misleading bureaucratic manuals that, with apparent good intentions, seriously underestimated the far-reaching consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe. After 1991, international organizations from the Red Cross to Greenpeace sought to help the victims, yet found themselves stymied by post-Soviet political circumstances they did not understand. International diplomats and scientists allied to the nuclear industry evaded or denied the fact of a wide-scale public health disaster caused by radiation exposure. Efforts to spin the story about Chernobyl were largely successful; the official death toll ranges between thirty-one and fifty-four people. In reality, radiation exposure from the disaster caused between 35,000 and 150,000 deaths in Ukraine alone. No major international study tallied the damage, leaving Japanese leaders to repeat many of the same mistakes after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011. Drawing on a decade of archival research and on-the-ground interviews in Ukraine, Russia, and Belarus, Kate Brown unveils the full breadth of the devastation and the whitewash that followed. Her findings make clear the irreversible impact of man-made radioactivity on every living thing; and hauntingly, they force us to confront the untold legacy of decades of weapons-testing and other nuclear incidents, and the fact that we are emerging into a future for which the survival manual has yet to be written.
Amazon Indiebound Barnes and Noble WorldCat Goodreads LibraryThing
Pick icon
100%
blurb
Alisnazzy
post image

My view this morning while I read some more about Chernobyl 🥰

Chelsea.Poole Gorgeous 🌴 4mo
jveezer Oy. A friend of mine was one of the first soldiers sent in after the meltdown. With no protection, of course. Scary. 😳 4mo
79 likes2 comments
review
wtimblin
post image
Pickpick

A thoroughly enjoyable and informative book about the Chernobyl disaster in the mid-80s. Shocking how foreign governments, not just the Soviets, tried to silence the growing body of evidence of health problems associated with long-term, low-level radiation exposure. All to deflect attention away from the adverse health impact of decades of nuclear bomb testing. An important read

31 likes1 stack add
review
Jdroper
Pickpick

My second Chernobyl book in a month, both are very much worth reading. This one is more about the widespread health issues from people processing wool and hides of contaminated animals and from people eating their own produce grown in contaminated fields. And the government‘s cover up, of course.