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The Girl Who Drew Butterflies
The Girl Who Drew Butterflies: How Maria Merian's Art Changed Science | Joyce Sidman
4 posts | 5 read | 4 to read
Bugs, of all kinds, were considered to be born of mud and to be beasts of the devil. Why would anyone, let alone a girl, want to study and observe them? One of the first naturalists to observe live insects directly, Maria Sibylla Merian was also one of the first to document the metamorphosis of the butterfly. In this visual nonfiction biography, richly illustrated throughout with full-color original paintings by Merian herself, the Newbery Honorwinning author Joyce Sidman paints her own picture of one of the first female entomologists and a woman who flouted convention in the pursuit of knowledge and her passion for insects.
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Cortg
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Our library reading challenge this month is to read a science book. September‘s book club book is The Girl Who Drew Butterflies. The county has this book listed in their 8th grade summer reading list and it‘s also a choice for the upcoming Books for the Beast in Baltimore. So...I picked it up, and found it so intriguing, I took photos of a moth in my yard and compared pictures of said moth with a neighbor who also took pictures! I learned so much!

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ha_kaye
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🦋 The Girl Who Drew Butterflies is a B tell that tells the story of Maria Sibylla Merian, a self-taught artist in the 17th century who was the first person to document the metamorphosis of a butterfly. While this is considered a picture book, there is a lot of information so an older audience would be better. The Girl Who Drew Butterflies would integrate science into reading time. #LAE3414sp19

ha_kaye This story would make an amazing GR since there are so many wonderful illustrations that the students should be able to see. The link is to an educator‘s guide from Joyce Sidman‘s website. It gives a brief synopsis of the book and the author, as well as, providing pre-reading activities, discussion questions, and post-reading activities. https://www.joycesidman.com/books/the-girl-who-drew-butterfli/girlwhodrewbutterf... 7mo
ha_kaye UDL principle 3.3, guide information processing and visualization, would work perfect if The Girl Who Drew Butterflies was read as a GR. The teacher is able to stop and think out loud to model what students should be doing while reading. EL strategy #28 is ideal for this story since it tells the life of a German woman. 7mo
alexandracarpenter This book sounds amazing! It is always a good idea to show students examples of amazing women who work in STEM. I think this would be great to have in any classroom. 7mo
ha_kaye @alexandracarpenter Yes! I completely agree that it is crucial to show that there were more than just men who contribute in STEM (: 7mo
DrSpalding Another beautiful biography! Alex said it well that we need great books about women especially in the area of science etc. 7mo
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abbylibrarian
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This middle grade biography of early entomologist Maria Merian is a great choice for kids interested in nature and budding feminists. The sections are structured like a butterfly‘s life cycle, a process that Merian helped document in a way that hadn‘t been done before. At that time lots of people thought that insects literally spontaneously occurred!

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BethFishReads
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This is a gorgeously illustrated, well-researched biography about a 17th-century woman who is considered to be one of the first ecologists. The book may be geared to tweens but it‘s for everyone. More on this & other science books https://www.bethfishreads.com/2018/06/3-excellent-books-for-budding-young.html?m...

LeahBergen These look wonderful! 1y
BethFishReads @LeahBergen I can‘t say enough good things 1y
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