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Winners Take All
Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World | Anand Giridharadas
An insider's incisive and eye-opening account of the hypocrisies lurking behind the global elite's efforts to "change the world" through philanthropy and free enterprise without confronting their role in creating and perpetuating the very problems they purport to solve. Anand Giridharadas paints a hugely revealing picture of how the cosmopolitan global elite has co-opted the idea of "changing the world": reframing social problems as market problems; lavishly rewarding "thought leaders" who peddle winner-friendly theories of progress; and asking always how to do more good but never how to do less harm. Giridharadas hears the limousine confessions of a major charity's executive, tangles with a former American president about his plutocratic hangers-on, and attends a cruise-ship conference where entrepreneurs celebrate their own self-interested magnanimity. He poses difficult, urgent questions: Should the world's gravest problems be solved by unelected elites rather than the public institutions they flout with lobbying and tax loopholes? What does it mean to give millions away if those millions--actually billions--were made selling OxyContin, the drug of choice of the opioid epidemic? And he speaks truth to power: Only by tackling problems through democracy rather than charity with strings attached can we begin to truly change the world. A call to action for both elites and everyday citizens.
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Wellreadhead
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Howard_L
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“In fact it was nine billionaires...possessed as much wealth as the bottom half of humanity (3.6 billion people)”
“Somehow in being efficient and being clever and being productive, people thought they had the license to just stop thinking about the human beings and the well-being of everybody else in the system”
“The young and the helped, mostly black and brown, repeatedly dance for their donors”
“Generosity is not a substitute for justice”.

SamAnne An illuminating book for sure. 3mo
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Blaire
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Interesting examination of why the ultra wealthy and society have bought into the idea that it is their role to solve society‘s problem through philanthropy but without addressing the root causes of inequality. why we have bought into market solutions in place of public policy solutions. I think this has started to shift back with people like Warren, Sanders, and others in the democratic field proposing government and policy based solutions. 👇

Blaire Examines their role and unwillingness, in many cases, to advocate for policies that would address the problem in the first place as opposed to throwing money at inequality later. Goes back to time of Carnegie who justified low wages by saying necessary to make more to give more away even as he perpetuated difficulty in the lives of those who worked directly for him. Lots to think about. (edited) 3mo
Billypar Excellent review! Stacked. 3mo
ChasingOm Fascinating. Adding this to my TBR! 3mo
Tamra No getting hands dirty by throwing money at a challenge. Or effort diverted away from pursuits. 😑 3mo
Blaire @ChasingOm @billypar Preet Bharara had a good interview with the author on his podcast -stay tuned - which is how I first heard about the book. 3mo
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WeAreLegion
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‘Win-Win‘ is the ethos of the plutocrat philanthropist. The idea that society can be uplifted by a wealthy individual while making a profit as well.
Bullshit.
The obvious yet scary (to the wealthy) solution to our historic economic disparity is strengthening and properly funding government and public initiatives. However, this simple concept involves a redistribution of wealth (ie make the rich pay taxes), that the elites simply will not condone.

SamAnne Such a good read hitting head on some hard truths. 4mo
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taraWritesSci
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Where to start? From the prologue to the epilogue, the author does not hold back on his criticism of the rich and their disproportionate privileges that come from taking more than the entire population of the remaining classes. And the wealthy, charitable "philanthropist"? Brilliantly skewered by the fact that they wouldn't be needed if they weren't taking so much.

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Quippe
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Anand Giridharadas is a former McKinsey consultant, a political analyst for MSNBC and a writer and in this topical book that bristles with anger and frustration but is very repetitive, he sets out how the global elite attempt to use neo-liberal, market-based win-win solutions to fight inequality but fail to realise that their refusal to allow discussion or solutions that threaten their own interests only serve to increase resentment.

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Mentallofilth
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A very good read about the mindset of neoliberalism that has come to dominate both parties, and how narrow our view of doing good in the world has become. Witty, readable, and laser focused on people who believe that the rich can - or should - save us.

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Chris
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SamAnne
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While the harsh truths of progressive philanthropy funded by the wealthy elite are evident to those who work on progressive causes, this book really brings all the threads together. A must-read for anyone involved in political or progressive causes. My full review on goodreads: www.goodreads.com/review/show/25078727

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SamAnne
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My next Audible read (and currently have the library copy). I work on environmental restoration and justice, pushing to get 4 dams off the Snake River in eastern Washington State, to bring salmon back in abundance to thousands of miles of river. Bringing salmon back for Native American tribes, for endangered Puget Sound orca that rely on salmon for food, for fishing dependent small businesses. A necessary read, but not an uplifting one.

Suet624 Thank you for what you do. 13mo
SamAnne Ah thanks. It takes the proverbial village. 13mo
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Pedrocamacho
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This is an important book. His critique of modern philanthropy is especially powerful. As an example, I‘d never really considered how many modern forms of philanthropy could actually hobble the functioning of government.

SamAnne I just finished the chapter on thought leaders, Cutty, Brene Brown and the problems with the “gratitude movement.” Wow. I work on environmental restoration and justice. I will be recommending this book to colleagues. 13mo
Pedrocamacho Yeah, @SamAnne, I found that distinction and analysis useful too. 12mo
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Kobe83

Nyt notable book 2018

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SilversReviews
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CONGRATS, Heather.

I will contact Heather and all other entrants.

More giveaways on my blog coming up.

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Endowarrior21

@bookish_wookish your package is on its way to you. You should receive it Monday :-). #giveawaywinner

bookish_wookish Thank you!!!! I cant wait!!! 😊 2y
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